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  1. #46
    Join Date
    Feb 2024
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    Sunshine coast
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    So took apart the old grease gun and as Baron J suggested it has a leather plunger (need replacing) but everything else cleaned up ok. The tip although some pitting still grabbed hold of the nipple. So need to find a leather plunger to suit now, start a project and create other projects along the way Just what the house boss wants to hear.
    grease gun 1.jpg fitting.jpg

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Southern Flinders Ranges
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    1,583

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    And before you know it youíre shaving a yak as the north americanos would say

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Feb 2024
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    Sunshine coast
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    42

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    Quote Originally Posted by racingtadpole View Post
    And before you know it youíre shaving a yak as the north americanos would say
    trying to source a 41.6mm leather cup washer may very well be yak shaving not something that is in high demand.
    leather cup washer.jpg could probably make one but am wondering if just stacking 3 to 6 round flat leather washers (dependant on leather thickness) would achieve much the same thing. The leather connects to the rod with a large flat washer top and bottom and the leather swells to create the seal. Flat is far easier to make than cup, what do you all think ?????

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Narrabeen, Sydney NSW Australia
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    157

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    Quote Originally Posted by getshafted400 View Post
    Thanks for the input ruckusman, diesel is cheaper and easier to get in a small hinterland town so great nugget. It was your lathe thread and seeing all the support you received that convinced me to sign up and seek advice. Not all forums are quite so friendly .
    I've got two favourite forums on the net, 2fiftycc.com and this one.

    Here is like walking into the biggest engineering firm workshop imaginable and everyone is really friendly and incredibly helpful - there's got to be millennia worth of knowledge and experience here and it's shared and given so openly.

    I'm still amazed at how much help and assistance I received.

    Restores your faith in humanity

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Narrabeen, Sydney NSW Australia
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    157

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    Quote Originally Posted by getshafted400 View Post
    trying to source a 41.6mm leather cup washer may very well be yak shaving not something that is in high demand.
    leather cup washer.jpg could probably make one but am wondering if just stacking 3 to 6 round flat leather washers (dependant on leather thickness) would achieve much the same thing. The leather connects to the rod with a large flat washer top and bottom and the leather swells to create the seal. Flat is far easier to make than cup, what do you all think ?????
    You could probably achieve a result with a few flat leather washers - got any belts in the wardrobe you've grown out of, or a quick trip to the op shop?

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Brisbane. Qld. Australia
    Age
    70
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    1,538

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    Is 1 5/8" close enough? Not cheap though.

    https://www.southernpumping.com.au/p...r-pump-buckets
    Nev.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Toorloo Arm, VIC
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    39
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    1,323

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    Quote Originally Posted by getshafted400 View Post
    trying to source a 41.6mm leather cup washer may very well be yak shaving not something that is in high demand.
    leather cup washer.jpg could probably make one but am wondering if just stacking 3 to 6 round flat leather washers (dependant on leather thickness) would achieve much the same thing. The leather connects to the rod with a large flat washer top and bottom and the leather swells to create the seal. Flat is far easier to make than cup, what do you all think ?????
    Just make a cup. Very easy. I just did one a couple of weeks ago for an ancient crown pallet stacker, cut a bit of leather out of an Irwin tool belt pouch thingy I was given and never used.

    Plenty of videos on the tube on it, but you need a form, which can be as simple as a couple bits of ply, the top one of which has had a hole holesawed through, and the cutout can be used as the male former. Get some hot water, almost boiling, throw rough cut circle of leather in, wait an hour or so for it to get pliable, put it on the form, smoosh the male former down into the cavity and clamp it, walk away. Come back in a few hours, trim up, drill hole in the middle, fit.

    Advantage of the cup is when you start pumping, the oil fills the cup, and the hydraulic pressure flares the lips out against the cylinder. I sort of accidentally took the one I made to 5 tons pressure testing it in the hydraulic press - not bad for a cylinder in a 500kg rated pallet stacker. Flat will have a tendency to bypass if the pressure gets up (like if you have a blocked oil gallery.)

  8. #53
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Willowbank QLD
    Posts
    563

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    If only you had a lathe, you could spin up a disk and put an o ring on it .

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    York, North Yorkshire UK
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    6,552

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    Hi Steve, Guys,

    I've tried that ! and it still leaked...

    Now that J&H has pointed out how to make one, a leather bucket is next.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Narrabeen, Sydney NSW Australia
    Posts
    157

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    Till J&H explained how to make one - clever technique - I was wondering if there was a special niche breed of cattle, bred for unfortunate shaped lumps

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Feb 2024
    Location
    Sunshine coast
    Posts
    42

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    Well first bucket washer was a fail, did some reading and along with the advice here made a wooden die to press the bucket. Found some leather strapping, cut the basic shape with an extra 15mm around the edge, dropped it into boiling water came back 3 hours later to find the leather had shrunk beyond useable . Lesson learned, and for others planning to make their own, cut the leather far bigger than what you think you need to allow for shrinkage. Have to source a bigger piece of leather now.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Feb 2024
    Location
    Sunshine coast
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    42

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    Sourced another piece of leather, left it soaking overnight and half the day and pressed the bucket washer. Will give it 24 hours and then pop it out, used 3mm leather (about the same as original) see no reason why it won't work. Interestingly I was checking out the original and it had a small seam on the base, gently peeled it apart and it was a leather flat washer. They must construct them that way for a reason so I will do the same and cut a leather flat washer and install the 2 pieces. As these are meant to swell a little with the oil they absorb and then under pressure the lip pushes against the side of the cylinder to create the seal, should I fill it with some engine oil to season the new washers before I start filling with kero to clean out the lathe ???
    new washer.jpg

    My next question is on measuring equipment, in this digital everything age do I just purchase digital calipers and dial indicators? Regardless of digital or analog what increments do they need to be 0.01 or 0.001 (metric) or is it different for the individual device and where it is being used? (Second hand market there is far more imperial DI's at cheaper prices so something being used just to set up material at the chuck could that be imperial as you are trying to get as close to a zero reading or is this just complicating things and just stick with metric everywhere) I try to buy the best I can afford but with how good the technology is in digital devices these days I wonder if some of the middle of the road brands are good enough. I reload my pistol ammo and even the cheap scales are getting hard to fault, are calipers like this ? I see there could be more of a difference in dial indicators vs calipers and probably a bit more of opinion on what is acceptable and considered a good product with the indicators.

  13. #58
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    York, North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    6,552

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    Hi Chester,

    I have a selection of dial indicators, my best one is 1/10000 a tenth of a thou reading ! My most used ones are 1/1000 a 1 thou reading. I also have a couple of tenth millimeter ones and also 100 th mm ones.

    When you consider that a tenth of a mm is four thou and 100 th mm is as near as makes no difference 1/2 a thou. Then how precise do you want to be !

    The same reasoning applies to verniers and micrometers, though they tend to be able to indicate much smaller divisions.

    Mechanical or digital makes little difference ! The real difference is, does the instrument repeat accurately and can you trust that is the case. One of the tips given to me was when making something to a dimension, always use the same instrument to make the measurement. There is no guarantee that a different instrument will give you the same reading.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Age
    57
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    2,725

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    Dial indicators are much easier to use than digital when checking for variation like when setting up a workpiece in the chuck. I donít actually own any digital indicators but have used them in the past.
    Plunger style have more travel - typically around 10mm.
    One of those should be the first on your list.
    Lever style allows you to clock inside diameters - second on the list.
    Definitely get some cheaper ones for a start. You cry less if they have a gravity related accident.
    My dial ones have traditional style mag bases and arms but the lever one has a cheap copy of the Noga style.
    I find those combinations work well.

    Calipers - digital all the way in my view. Iíve been very happy with my iGaging ones, and have just bought a second set.
    Thereís a recent thread about calipers so have a read of that.

    An imperial micrometer and a calculator gets you metric measurements and you can often pick up good quality sets of imperials for cheap - either as multiple micrometers or a larger frame with spacer bars. Great to have around for those sizes that you donít have a decent metric mic for.
    A 0-25 and a 25-50 mic in a reasonable brand will cover most of what you do for a start

    TBH I donít use my micrometers a lot.
    The work Iím doing typically doesnít need the accuracy, and the iGaging calipers are my measurement tool 95% of the time.

    Steve

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Toorloo Arm, VIC
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    39
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    1,323

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    Yes, soak the washer in oil for a little bit before you fit it. It will be surprisingly hard when you get it out of the mold, convenient for trimming etc. The oil will make it pliable again, and easier to get in. The cup should be a reasonably nice fit in the bore. Once you push the plunger, simply the act of displacing the oil will flare the cup out a bit, and the more pressure you build, the more it flares out and the better it seals.

    Re indicators/tools/etc. What do you actually envision yourself DOING with the lathe? Some days I can get by with nothing more than a ruler, other days the bench is covered in measuring gear.

    Similarly, to disagree a bit with OxxandBert, I only tend to use a dial plunger indicator for setting end float on car parts. For everything else, I generally don't care what the measurement is, just how much the needle moves and which way, so I use a dial test (lever) indicator for everything. I often find myself needing to indicate across grooves/t slots/etc, and providing you set up with the direction of movement in mind, the test indicator just happily trails the lever off and on these edges without intervention, where the dial indicator wants to drop the plunger in the hole all the time. Personal preference.

    I also find my 50-75mm micrometer gets a lot of work (equal to my 25-50). And I use telescopic gauges a lot. Then again, I also often tend to work to levels of accuracy far beyond what is needed, just for the practice. Far better to miss a bore diameter by 0.01mm a few times on a hole that is just letting air through, than on the part you've already got 5 hours in. Means my low accuracy parts take longer, but when it comes to the tight parts I usually don't even think twice about it, I just do it. Having worked like this for so many years, I now am getting more lazy and just use the iGaging digital for the less critical stuff.

    If you're going to build tiny model engines, for example, most of the gear I use regularly will be useless to you. If you're into restoring old trucks, most of the gear I use regularly will be too small. And if you're making, er... 'adult' products, I suppose you probably don't need any measuring gear at all, just the customer for a test fit...

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