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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2024
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    4

    Default Herbert B drill press restoration problem

    Hi, this is my first post so I guess is my introduction to the group. I love old heavy machinery especially waldown drills but this post is to ask your assistance with a problem I'm having with a Herbert B drill restoration. The B is a tiny high speed drill and mine is the 18000 rpm variant with a single phase motor and a albrect keyless chuck with a maximum opening of 3mm. This tiny capacity drill still weighs about 20kg and is an awesome bit of vintage engineering. I found some old posts on this forum about other restorations of this model which was why I joined.
    So, to my problem. I'm an electrician by trade so have taken to bits more than my fair share of electric motors but I struggling to get the drive end armature bearing off this drills British made crompton parkinson motor. The bearing is trapped behind what I think is a one piece pulley adapter. I say I think because it is possible but I think unlikely that the ring that appears to be a spacer in front of the bearing is a separate part but a very close look at the joint suggests it is part of an adapter. I initially tried to pull the bearing and spacer off with a split plate bearing puller with no luck. It was then that I had a close look at the spacer and decided the adapter is one part. I had a close look around the spacer and can not see a taper pin that has been driven through the spacer and armature shaft and then polished smooth. My best guess is that it is screwed into the armature shaft but my best efforts with an 18 inch strap wrench after gripping the shaft between some ali jaws in a vice haven't got it to budge. The bolt in the end of the shaft is left hand and I have tried unscrewing the armature off the adapter in both direction but got nowhere.
    There are only a few pictures on the web of this drill that detail the motor pulley but none of them are quite like this arrangement. This has a parallel 1/2 shaft for the pulley to fit over whereas the rest have a taper inside the pulley and the spare parts brochure which was linked in the other resto post on this site suggests that there is matching taper attachment that is fitted to the motor shaft. There is a picture on the web which shows this taper adapter attached with a small taper pin but that doesn't seem to be the case here.
    I contacted Herbert at the spare parts email link which is on this forum but didn't get a reply.
    Any of you fine folks got any wisdom to share?
    cheers
    Paul Henneberry Jarrahdale, Western Australia
    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    York, North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    6,469

    Default

    Hi Paul,

    Welcome to the forums.

    I think that you will find that the ring in front of the bearing, is not pinned, and is a shrink fit. The rotor is pressed onto the shaft and secured by the splines that run all the way through it.

    A three leg puller with a suitable dimple in the end of the bolt * and the legs behind the bearing, with the sudden application of heat directly on the collar might allow it to move.

    *Do not apply the puller screw directly to the end of the shaft ! You will likely damage the shaft end. Screw the bolt in so that it bears on the shaft end, use a flat washer if needed.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Brisbane. Qld. Australia
    Age
    70
    Posts
    1,513

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2024
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Hello again and thanks to Nev and BaronJ for their replies.
    BaronJ was correct in suggesting that the pulley mount wasnt an adapter and that the spacer was a separate part although no amount of pulling with lots of heat and a three leg puller would budge it. Luckily I have a lathe at home with a throat big enough that I could fit the whole rotor in the chuck and turn off the spacer. Thanks again for the suggestion BanronJ, that really looked like it was one part.
    So the drill is back together with a new coat of paint and a bit of added bling. I always wanted to have a go at nickel plating and it is as easy as the youtube clips make it look. A few handles, screws and covers got the treatment and I'm happy how it looks. I also replaced the 60 year old plastic labels with some brass ones I reproduced on my CNC router. They looked a bit gaudy when polished so I aged them a bit with vinegar. Not sure how much use this tiny drill will get but it is so very cute.
    cheers
    Paul20240331_161205.jpg20240331_161222.jpg20240331_161240.jpg

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    York, North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    6,469

    Default

    Hi Paul,

    Glad you got it sorted.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    York, North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    6,469

    Default

    Hi Paul,

    Forgot to include in my last post about getting your pictures to show the right way up !
    Check out this link.

    https://metalworkforums.com/f316/t20...sting-pictures
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2024
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Thanks for this as well BaronJ. I guessed it must be possible but after 10 minutes of trying to rotate my pics I gave up. Next time I have something to post the pics will be oriented as appropriate.
    cheers
    Paul

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Riddells Creek, Vic.
    Posts
    835

    Default

    Nice job restoring that old Herbert drill, we had one in the machine shop at TAA when I worked there. I have a Waldown NH which is probably based on the Herbert design.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2024
    Location
    Perth, Western Australia
    Posts
    4

    Default

    Hi LexD,
    I have spent the last 10 years looking for a waldown NH without luck. They are rare over here in the west. I was lucky to get this Herbert instead. I've restored a few bigger waldowns and am familiar with the quill engineering on them. If the quill on the NH is the same as their big brothers, the system on this Herbert is more refined. If it wasnt for an old post on this forum about the disassembly steps I would have never guessed how to strip it down. Quite the mechanical puzzle.
    cheers
    Paul

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