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  1. #1
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    Default Little oxy set using disposable gas -- useful for occasional DIY or just a gimmick?

    Are these "Bromic" brand "Professional Oxyset Portable Brazing & Welding System", from H&F Machinery House a gimmick, or would it be genuinely useful for occasional general DIY-type jobs?

    Link below, but basically it's a 400g MAP-PRO disposable gas cylinder and 950ml oxygen disposable cylinder, mounted in a plastic caddy, with regulator, hoses and all the bits and pieces.

    I don't think I'd be concerned that it uses small disposable gas cylinders, because my rate of activity is pretty low. But it's gotta actually work -- on say, lightweight sheet metal and steel tube constructions, the sort of thing where MIG might be too heavy.

    https://www.machineryhouse.com.au/o018

    They've got a sale on now, so ...

    Ian

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnaduit View Post
    on say, lightweight sheet metal and steel tube constructions, the sort of thing where MIG might be too heavy. Ian
    Hi Ian, it would be handy if you wanted to silver solder plumbing bits or braze something, ie, a small cast component, or weld aluminium pieces.
    MIG can be turned down to weld car body thickness, so I don't know how much thinner material you would want to weld?
    HTH
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Kryn

    Yes I think that would be about the scope of what I'd be doing with it. I suppose the advantage for sheet metal would be no raised weld? And that it can cope with gal sheet and tube? But otherwise, it'd be for the kinds of things you've suggested.

    I don't have MiG, but am thinking of getting a Unimig Viper 182 MKII at the same time, to replace my old arc welder. So I'm hoping the two units will cover my needs.

    Ian

  4. #4
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    I don't think you can go wrong with a Unimig. They're basically the best of the cheaper welders in my opinion, well used to be. I don't know what the current ones are like.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by KBs PensNmore View Post
    I don't think you can go wrong with a Unimig. They're basically the best of the cheaper welders in my opinion, well used to be. I don't know what the current ones are like.
    Kryn
    FWIW, the reviews for it (the "Mk II", seems to have come out in 2021) on the Total tools website are all very positive, so that gives me confidence in it. Once again, I'll only be an occasional user so it's not worth me buying a serious trade model -- nice to know that you think the Unimigs have/had a good reputation among the 'consumer' type models.

    Those reviews: https://www.totaltools.com.au/155405...welder-u11002k

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnaduit View Post
    would it be genuinely useful for occasional general DIY-type jobs?

    Ian, there are even cheaper ones than that!
    e.g $267 from Bunnings: https://www.bunnings.com.au/bossweld...g-kit_p0253366

    It doesn't have a cutting head, so I wouldn't really call it an Oxy set,
    but it should still be a step up from Butane/Propane, or MAP torches?

  7. #7
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    Personally I can't see the point in one of those small oxy sets. Normal MAP gas is fine for small general brazing and silver soldering, and I reckon you'd probably be nearly out of gas in one of those small sets before you got your hand in for any welding.
    Have you considered going down the TIG route instead of oxy welding?
    That Unimig doesn't have TIG capability which is unusual for an inverter machine. My suggestion would be to find a model which DOES have TIG, and get that instead.
    I grew up with oxy welding, but once I got a TIG there was no point in having it apart from for heating/cutting. I've now gone to oxy-lpg for that.
    TIG will definitely do all your light work - and better than oxy welding in my experience.

    One last suggestion. If your old welder is an old school transformer welder the leads are probably a decent gauge, possibly longer, and the earth clamp could well be better than you get with a new welder.
    Nobody is really interested in buying those old welders these days, so they're not worth much more than scrap value. The leads might be of more value to you to keep.

    Steve

  8. #8
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    Steve, you've influenced my decisions here.

    - the disposable gas cylinder kit might be too small as you say. Looks like if I stick with brazing, going oxy-LPG is a better approach. The kit is about $350 to $600, and the extra is a refillable oxygen cylinder. Over a few projects the cost would probably work out not a lot more than the disposable kit.

    - if I spend about $200 extra, I can get the next model up of Unimig welder, the Viper 185, and that has DC TIG as well as the MIG. So on the "never say never" basis, who knows, I might get into TIG. It's a $200 wager with myself. And maybe it's going to make brazing redundant, as you say.

    The question is if I still get oxy-LPG gear (assuming I'm not going to master TIG all that well) instead of the disposable map gas kit, then which one to get. Anyway, I won't get that H&F kit I mentioned in my first post. I'll get the MIG(/TIG?) welder, and then see if I still need brazing.

    Ian

  9. #9
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    I have had one for probably last 10 years. They are very finicky to use with a gentle touch on the valves to get a good flame. It has its uses for silver soldering copper pipes, more heat in a concentrated area than a MAP torch , but for larger jobs still rely on normal oxy acet torch.

    The other thing see if you can get a good secondhand oxy set, then the returnable oxy and acet cylinders from bunning etc makes a good option. No rental and get back deposit if you keep receipt.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by OxxAndBert View Post
    That Unimig doesn't have TIG capability which is unusual for an inverter machine. My suggestion would be to find a model which DOES have TIG, and get that instead.
    Steve
    I can't see any reason why you couldn't connect a tig torch to it and run it on stick mode, it's a DC capable machine.

    Sent from my SM-N975F using Tapatalk

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Com_VC View Post
    I can't see any reason why you couldn't connect a tig torch to it and run it on stick mode, it's a DC capable machine.
    I think this is referring to the UniMig Viper 182 -- I'd only suppose that if it was TIG capable, then that would count as a manufacturer's selling point. As it is, UniMig only begin with MIG/TIG spec on their next model up, the Viper 185. Unless maybe, if you're on the ball and can mod the cheaper welder, or whatever would be required. But as a novice I'm thinking pay the extra $200 and have the factory version.

    They have a handy guide to their different welders here: https://unimig.com.au/choosing-the-r...chine-for-you/

    Ian

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sparksy View Post
    I have had one for probably last 10 years. They are very finicky to use with a gentle touch on the valves to get a good flame. It has its uses for silver soldering copper pipes, more heat in a concentrated area than a MAP torch , but for larger jobs still rely on normal oxy acet torch.

    The other thing see if you can get a good secondhand oxy set, then the returnable oxy and acet cylinders from bunning etc makes a good option. No rental and get back deposit if you keep receipt.
    Thanks for sharing your experience on the disposable map-oxy sets, Sparksy. It sounds good for plumbers. But maybe not so good for light steel fabrication. In my mind brazing still has its place, but yeah, it probably needs more powerful equipment than that to be versatile. 2nd hand oxy-acet would be one way to go -- or the oxy-lpg stuff.

    There was an interesting article about the pros and cons of lpg vs acetylene welding in "The Shed" magazine from New Zealand, earlier this year: https://the-shed.nz/welding-with-lpg/ . Incidentally it looks like a great mag, pity the subscription to Australia is twice the NZ price. If I lived in NZ I think I'd definitely subscribe.

    Ian

  13. #13
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    Default Little oxy set using disposable gas -- useful for occasional DIY or just a gimmick?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnaduit View Post
    Thanks for sharing your experience on the disposable map-oxy sets, Sparksy. It sounds good for plumbers. But maybe not so good for light steel fabrication. In my mind brazing still has its place, but yeah, it probably needs more powerful equipment than that to be versatile. 2nd hand oxy-acet would be one way to go -- or the oxy-lpg stuff.

    There was an interesting article about the pros and cons of lpg vs acetylene welding in "The Shed" magazine from New Zealand, earlier this year: https://the-shed.nz/welding-with-lpg/ . Incidentally it looks like a great mag, pity the subscription to Australia is twice the NZ price. If I lived in NZ I think I'd definitely subscribe.

    Ian
    I agree about The Shed magazine. I usually end up with the current edition whenever I travel to NZ. Seems to be something of interest to me in every one I pick up.
    That oxy-lpg article has some great info. Particularly about the difference in gas pressure between acetylene and lpg. Something that hadn't occurred to me even though I knew the different pressures in isolation. I had to replace my hoses and the oxy regulator at one point due to my own stupidity (knocked over an unrestrained oxy bottle) and I need to check that I haven't ended up with oxy-acet hoses without thinking.

    EDIT: I misread the article, thinking that the hose pressure for LPG was 100psi. Hose pressure is still only 15psi(100kpa) the same as acetylene.
    Its the LPG cylinder pressure that is 100psi.
    I've been using an acetylene rated hose on my lpg setup though - so will get that sorted.
    FWIW the rated pressures for both types of hoses are about the same. The difference in these ones will be due to their physical size or construction I'm guessing:






    Might not be the same up your way, but I just had a quick look on F/B Marketplace locally and there are plenty of used oxy-acet and even some oxy-lpg sets starting from around $150.
    I went lpg instead of acet just to save on the bottle cost. LPG works just as well for cutting, just takes a bit longer to get up to the initial start temperature before you can hit the cut lever as the flame temp is lower. There's always an LPG bottle with some gas in it around here so I only have to worry about the oxy bottle.

    Steve

  14. #14
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    Apologies for the thread hijack with Oxy-LPG posts - but being safety related I think its important to set things straight.

    For my own peace of mind, I did some research on the material used in the ALFAGOMMA oxy-acet hoses I've been using with my oxy-lpg setup.
    I can't find any difference in the hoses between the 2 types of fuel hoses. From what I can see the core hose is the same for oxy and both fuels - just different outer colour. The tube in all the hoses is Black SBR (Styrene butadiene rubber )
    Oxy-Acetylene
    https://hosefactory.com.au/products/...180-psi-in-5mm
    Oxy-LPG
    https://hosefactory.com.au/products/...80-psi-as-1335

    From THE SHED article referenced above:
    Hoses
    Acetylene hoses are usually red or maroon and LPG hoses are orange, to distinguish them. The difference is in the inner tube. The acetylene hose is usually black styrene/butane rubber, and the propane hose black nitrile/butadiene rubber. Hoses have a limited life. If by chance the wrong gas is used, these hoses will perish and rupture prematurely.

    I guess the important word there is "USUALLY" xxx rubber.

    In my specific situation I'm comfortable that the fuel hose I've got is OK to keep using although not technically the correct one.
    If I had realised when I bought it, I'd have definitely got an actual oxy-lpg hose rather than assuming they were just the same hose for both fuels.
    YMMV - but definitely something to be aware of.

    Steve

  15. #15
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    If you're thinking about a MIG that does TIG, this unit might be worth looking at:
    https://www.bunnings.com.au/bossweld...elder_p0274491
    It comes with MIG, stick and TIG gear.

    The catch with wanting to run MIG & TIG is that you'll need both MIG mix and Argon bottles.

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