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  1. #16
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    The name of the little rivets are drive rivets. They have a spiral knurl on the shaft to hold them in the blind hole.

    Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk

  2. #17
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    Sep 2012
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    Hi Guys,

    Those rivets are a swine to remove ! If you are lucky a pair of wire cutters with sharp jaws will grip them enough to get them free and removed. Otherwise just Dremel the head off and drill the stub out. I've replaced some using copper wire and a rivet snap in the past. Horrible things !
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jekyll and Hyde View Post
    I'd like to pull all the little plates off if I paint it, so I'll have to see whether you can buy little copper rivets anymore (don't fancy making those much). Think I'd like to just stay with the current colour, as I think it suits it quite well, but I'm kind of considering other colours.

    Also need to track down some felt (I think that's what I'll use) for making new wipers. Will also be handy as I'd like to replace the felt oil washer at the top of the Bridgeport spindle, which has seen better days.
    I have some spare felt (1/4" /6mm thick I think). Let me know if you need a bit. I might also have some drive screws if you don't need too many.

    Quote Originally Posted by OxxAndBert View Post

    RE paint, I used this Wattyl Killrust epoxy enamel on my press build. Pretty happy how it came out with brush application.
    Used a bit on my forklift using one of those 100mm rollers and that came out well too.


    It's good stuff. I painted my lathe with it (using a brush) and it is holding up well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jekyll and Hyde View Post
    Those white things in the top left are fuse holders; the fuses that they hold are known colloquially as a 'milk bottle fuse' as that is what they look like. They have sand in them so when the wire goes, the sand fuses to glass around the end and stops the arc.
    The thing is that they are not necessarily easy to find as they are a IEC standard fuse for industrial machines. (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEC_60269) Get onto your local industrial electrical supply place and get some spares on order while you don't need them. My mill takes them and I have 3 or 4 just in case for that reason, after the first time one blew.

    Michael

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael G View Post
    I have some spare felt (1/4" /6mm thick I think). Let me know if you need a bit. I might also have some drive screws if you don't need too many.
    I'll have to measure the wiper carriers and see what thickness I need, that point is likely to be a little way off at the moment anyway... I had a brief go at one of the rivets, with no sucess, so I'm not sure what size they are either - off the top of my head there'd be at least 20, maybe 30 on the machine though, so I might have to dig some up. At least I know what to look for now!

    Today I puttered around pre-cleaning one or two things, then decided to see whether the paint was really as bad as I thought. Less than 60 seconds later with a 1 inch scraper, and no effort, this is what I had:

    IMG_1391.jpg

    Yep, it's about as bad as I thought. Basically held on by friction in a lot of spots, and even the 'good' bits don't put up much of a fight. Guess I'm definitely painting it now.

    IMG_1392.jpg

    IMG_1393.jpg

    I had actually already picked up this morning a sample pot of paint that the missus and I determined via a book of Dulux colour swatches to be a possibility, but it's just a bit too light. However it seems like the next darker shade in that range should be good, or at least a colour I'd be happy with, so I'll have to head out tomorrow to get a sample pot of that colour. Will pick up some primer and probably some filler as well, so I can keep moving over the break, as the paint I'm intending at this stage to use has to be tinted by the factory, who are on holidays already, returning on the 4th of January. Plans may change though.

    Probably will be a bit quiet on this thread for a while as I really can't imagine anyone wants to see photos of every single little bit being cleaned, stripped, painted, etc, but if I come across anything that seems like someone might find interesting I'll chuck something up. I did determine that the oil reservoir for the end of the leadscrew I mentioned previously does also appear to be supposed to lube the end of the powerfeed rod, as there is a hole under the leadscrew which I assume goes down to the powerfeed rod. Not really sure how effective it's likely to be though, as there is no groove in the leadscrew bore to allow oil to pass around the leadscrew, it seems to be a case of whatever works its way around carried by the leadscrew to the hole is what you get... Still, interesting (to me anyway).

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
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    Melbourne
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    Wow congrats

    Plenty to keep you busy there.

    Any idea what the two items between the steadies are? I thought they were parts for the taper turner but later pics proved that wrong.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jekyll and Hyde View Post
    I seem to recall something about matched sets being desirable in this application, but not necessarily available anymore?
    As I understand it they aren't available anymore because belts "these days" are good enough that they aren't needed as long as you get three belts from the same place that is.

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stustoys View Post
    Any idea what the two items between the steadies are? I thought they were parts for the taper turner but later pics proved that wrong.
    Always second guessing yourself.... You were right the first time. As pictured on the machine, the taper turning attachment is just a passenger.

    Those two pieces clamp to the bed, and attach to the rods poking out from the taper attachment, in order to hold the upper sliding portion in place. Then as you traverse the carriage, the small square block slides along in the groove in the bolted on top section, giving whatever taper you've set by loosening the two bolts and swiveling it (think it is 14 degrees max in both directions, and there are bolt holes at either end of the curved slots to facilitate this, you just move the bolts to the other end of the slot to taper the other way). In theory you could actually delete the big casting underneath (if someone wanted to roll their own), it's really just a support for the part with the rods. At least, I'm pretty sure that is how it all works, I'll have a look and confirm it once it's back together. Will try and remember to document it in case anyone is struggling to visualise it.


    Quote Originally Posted by Stustoys View Post
    As I understand it they aren't available anymore because belts "these days" are good enough that they aren't needed as long as you get three belts from the same place that is.
    That appears to be the consensus of the internets. Also found on the internets I need A55 belts (confirmed by cutting the mostly broken one and measuring), which Repco appear to list Gates Hi Power II belts in that size for $16 each. Can probably find them a bit cheaper than that somewhere else, but nice to know if I get in a rush I can just order them in through the Repco that's 2 minutes from my house!

  7. #22
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    I detest painting.

    IMG_1428_1400x1050.jpg

    No, that is not the final colour - it's just the first coat of primer. Although it's bloody tempting to leave it like that, given how much more painting I've ahead of me. There is a large pile of yet to be dis-assembled bits on the ground yet to be dealt with, but at least they're mostly small, and not as frigging awkwardly shaped as the bed and the carriage. The door is the largest single piece, which you can see leaning up against the wall - but it shouldn't be too bad to deal with. Although I am kind of taking this approach at the moment:

    todo list.jpg

    In other news, while I hate painting, pulling things apart to this extent prepping for paint has allowed me to uncover various small issues that are easily fixed at this point. Number one discovery - taper pins are great. Until they aren't.

    IMG_1397_1400x1050.jpg

    This is the linkage for the clutch lever for FWD/REV. Whilst fiddling with various things, I poked my head in the motor compartment, and saw the hole on the right, which contains half a taper pin. It's supposed to have an external thread on it with a nut, like the one on the left, but no. So, I had to get it out, for two reasons. One being that not only was half missing, the other half was obviously broken, going by the movement of the cast arm on the shaft when playing with the clutch lever. It worked, but there was a lot of slop. Secondly, there is a seal on the rod that goes inside the headstock to actually actuate the clutch, and it's leaking (and is below the oil line), and getting it out required the taper pin to be removed in order to withdraw the cross shaft. On a side note, I have a list of seals as long as my arm written down - I'm going to replace every one I find, as I suspect they're pretty much all leaking, along with the sump...

    Of course, a G clamp wasn't sufficient to press the two pieces of taper pin out, and there is zero access to the back side to belt it out. So, motor was yanked from it's home, in order to drill the centre of the taper pin, then tap it and use a 5mm bolt with a nut to jack the first piece out. Once that was out, the G clamp was able to press the other piece loose, where I hooked it out with a long 3mm cap screw. You can imagine how much of a victory this felt like:

    IMG_1415_1400x1050.jpg

    Inspection of the arm revealed that there is a roller bearing that engages the helical slot on the clutch lever assembly, and it has some grooves worn in it. Should be cheap and easy to replace, and will take a tiny bit more slop out of the lever, so again, worth pulling apart (to me, anyway).

    Conveniently, with the motor out, I now have plenty of room to get at the 7 million bolts holding the sump on in order to wash it out and reseal it. Inspection inside the headstock revealed it's filthy:

    IMG_1404_1400x1050.jpg

    So the oil got drained, then everything got washed down into the sump, given it's coming off anyway to be resealed. Then drained again. But the star of this little show for me is the speed selector arrangement. Somebody designed this thing using a slide rule and a drawing board, and I have no idea how they worked out the exact location of the two spiral grooves in order to get the shift forks rocking back and forward to the exact location. I can't work out where it needs to be for any given speed without having the speed selector on the front - fortunately it's all keyed and only goes together one way.

    A similar arrangement is used for the quick change box selector. No picture of that, so here's the guts of that box:

    IMG_1427_1400x1050.jpg

    If anyone is interested, I can do a labeled version to explain how it works, and where the metric/imperial conversion happens. Haven't yet counted the teeth on the metric conversion arrangement, but I will, given the amount of time we spent in Mk1_OZs thread working out the exact conversion to get zero error. I have a sneaking suspicion though, that the conversion on this machine is not as accurate as you might expect. (Sorry Mk1_OZ!)

    A quick shot through the "friction clutch adjustment' panel, with the clutch pack in view bottom right. You can also see the two adjusting nuts to increase the preload on the clutch packs.

    IMG_1407_1400x1050.jpg

    And finally, hopping back up top of the headstock, this is the filter located behind the sight glass:

    IMG_1418_1400x1050.JPG

    What I'm not sure about though, is whether that is what it's supposed to look like (ie. just a rock catcher), or whether it's supposed to have some sort of material in there as well. Certainly there was some 'fluff' inside it (along with various small bits of metal), but seems quite likely that this was just clutch fibres?

  8. #23
    jatt's Avatar
    jatt is offline According to the Govt a slogan will fix everything
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    Quite a task, but good to see it progressing along.

    Once done you wouldnt sneeze at a AL335 in comparison
    I will never be the person who has everything, not when someone keeps inventing so much cool new stuff to buy.
    From an early age my father taught me to wear welding gloves . "Its not to protect your hands son, its to put out the fire when u set yourself alight".

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