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  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaronJ View Post
    Hi Pete,

    I couldn't tell from the picture that there were three pins in the Hall sensor socket. There seem to be a number of PWM controllers and they all seem to have similar connectors on the PCB's.

    I did have some pictures but they seem to have disappeared !

    Actually there are only two pins on the hall sensor socket; the location at the bottom of the pic marked F5V+ is not used, just a blank spot on the board.

  2. #17
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    Hi Pete,

    Can you determine if the 5 volt + pins on the board are all connected to each other ? If they are then its likely that the control panel can be disconnected. Without a scope you won't be able to tell if the up/down signal is a pulse or not, though you could simulate a pulse by applying 5v+ momentarily to the "UP" pin and see if the motor attempts to spin.

    I tried running the motor with the SCR controller and bridge rectifier; it ran but made noises that i did not like at all; when adjusting speed upwards with the potentiometer the motor sounds like it is arcing internally and when running at a steady speed there is a humming / groaning sound that is to my ear just NQR. I'm not confident running this good motor with the cheap eBay option unfortunately. If I can somehow give the speed commands to the existing control board it will b happy days.
    This bothers me ! The motor without any load should spin up quietly and smoothly. Don't run the motor at high speed unloaded. It could be that the motor has stood for some time and the lubrication in the bearings has moved to the lowest point and hardened. In which case running the motor for a while should redistribute the lubrication.

    You can test out the motor using a 12 volt car battery or two. It wont spin very fast but should be smooth and quiet.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  3. #18
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    Thanks again; the two locations marked 'F5V+' are indeed connected to each other on the back of the board. I'll put things back together and try jumping 5v to 'Up' and see what happens.
    The motor hasn't been sitting more than a couple of weeks, the machine has actually been in use recently and runs perfectly smoothly when operated by the normal treadmill controls.

  4. #19
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    Hi Pete,

    You are the second person to have reported that the treadmill motor runs badly when used with a Triac speed control and rectifier system. I'm going to set up to run a test with one of my treadmill motors and see if I can replicate the problem.

    One of the issues that I do know about is that the bridge rectifier doesn't actually produce a clean DC voltage supply. Its actually a very rough spiky DC and would benefit from some smoothing capacitance across the motor to knock the sharp spikes off. The trouble is that the motor takes such a high current that it would need a fairly high capacitance value to provide the current required. I forget the formula for calculating the capacitor value off hand, so I will have to look it up for you.

    EDIT:
    I cheated and went to Steve's post and copied my text from there.

    C = I / 2 x f x Vpp
    "C" = capacitance in farads, "I" = current in amps, "f" = frequency in Hz, "V" peak to peak ripple voltage.
    I would assume "V" to be 230 VAC x 1.414 = 325 volts / 2 = 162 Vpp
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  5. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaronJ View Post
    Hi Pete,

    You are the second person to have reported that the treadmill motor runs badly when used with a Triac speed control and rectifier system. I'm going to set up to run a test with one of my treadmill motors and see if I can replicate the problem.

    One of the issues that I do know about is that the bridge rectifier doesn't actually produce a clean DC voltage supply. Its actually a very rough spiky DC and would benefit from some smoothing capacitance across the motor to knock the sharp spikes off. The trouble is that the motor takes such a high current that it would need a fairly high capacitance value to provide the current required. I forget the formula for calculating the capacitor value off hand, so I will have to look it up for you.

    EDIT:
    I cheated and went to Steve's post and copied my text from there.

    C = I / 2 x f x Vpp
    "C" = capacitance in farads, "I" = current in amps, "f" = frequency in Hz, "V" peak to peak ripple voltage.
    I would assume "V" to be 230 VAC x 1.414 = 325 volts / 2 = 162 Vpp
    I will try to get my head around that formula and values and see what capacitors I have on hand, would be great if the addition of a capacitor was all it took to run smoothly on the simple controller setup.
    Edit: I make that 6 x 50 x 162= 48,600 farads. Seems I must be misunderstanding something.

  6. #21
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete O View Post
    I will try to get my head around that formula and values and see what capacitors I have on hand, would be great if the addition of a capacitor was all it took to run smoothly on the simple controller setup.
    Edit: I make that 6 x 50 x 162= 48,600 farads. Seems I must be misunderstanding something.

    From first principles
    C= Q/V
    where
    Q= Charge = I x t, and
    t = time = 1/frequency

    Thus C = (I x t)/V = (I x 1/f)/V

    = (6 x 1/50)/162 = 0.00074F or 740F

  7. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete O View Post
    I will try to get my head around that formula and values and see what capacitors I have on hand, would be great if the addition of a capacitor was all it took to run smoothly on the simple controller setup.
    Edit: I make that 6 x 50 x 162= 48,600 farads. Seems I must be misunderstanding something.
    Hi Guys,

    Hey, even I don't trust my maths, I had to look it up.

    Its that long ago I have to look up most things nowadays
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  8. #23
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    Thanks very much guys. Did I mention this stuff is a great darkness to me? I can generally follow instructions with electronics and hook things up without electrocuting myself (well ok there was that one time) but I make absolutely no claim to understand how it works

    I may possibly be able to come up with 740uf worth of capacitors, not certain, will have a rummage in my boxes of stuff with wires. Unfortunately I will probably not be able to get back to this until mid next week now though.

  9. #24
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    Hi Pete,

    The amount of capacitance is not critical, but the voltage rating should be about 375 volts or more ! Just look at the ratings and values on the ones on the treadmill power unit. The big black ones !

    Also be aware that a capacitor of this size can hold enough charge to kill you so make sure that you turn the motor speed down to zero and unplug it before you go touching any wires. Remember "One hand in pocket" !
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  10. #25
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaronJ View Post
    Hi Pete,

    The amount of capacitance is not critical, but the voltage rating should be about 375 volts or more ! Just look at the ratings and values on the ones on the treadmill power unit. The big black ones !

    Also be aware that a capacitor of this size can hold enough charge to kill you so make sure that you turn the motor speed down to zero and unplug it before you go touching any wires. Remember "One hand in pocket" !
    Maybe also think about setting up a safe discharge method. A incandescent light globe with a standard plug can usually reach across std cap terminals that way you can see if the thing was still charged or not?

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