Results 1 to 14 of 14
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney North Shore
    Posts
    11

    Default Welding brass clock gear.

    I have a clock wheel/gear with extensive wear in the spokes from the click spring. It needs to be welded.
    is there anyone on here who lives in the Northern suburbs of Sydney that can do this job? Covid19 is limiting my travelling distance
    8CF777E9-2BDC-452B-86D6-AF0BDCCAF49D.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Near Bendigo, Victoria, AUS
    Age
    69
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    That looks like a brazing job, but I don't know for sure if you can braze brass (because of the zinc content). Silver soldering would be the choice of process, but then it doesn't look "right" because the repair will be silver in colour....
    How big and how heavy is the wheel? It looks like a clock tower clockwork..
    Cheers, Joe
    retired - less energy, more time to contemplate projects and more shed time....

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney North Shore
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Thanks for the reply.
    Silver soldering in a brass piece has been suggested as has filling it with brass weld. Silver soldering a brass piece seems to be the simplest solution but as you say you will see lines of silver solder hence my search for someone who can weld brass.
    The wheel/gear is right in the guts of the clock and hard to measure but it’s around 80mm diameter so not that large.
    i wouldn’t mind getting a new one made either but that could be expensive and I’d have to find someone that can do it.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Near Bendigo, Victoria, AUS
    Age
    69
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    Hi. I did a little research on brass welding. It seems that silicon bronze and aluminium bronze both have lower melting temperature than brass. So brass can be brazed. The process that works is TIG brazing.
    So you can try and find someone in Sydney to learn brass TIG brazing and then have a go at your gear.
    If you are unsuccessful or are game, I'm certainly going to have a play now that my interest has been stimulated. I'm quite good at TIG welding and brazing, but have never tried brass. I'm happy to let you know how I go.
    If I can get it to work ok, you could post me the gear for repairing and I'll post it back when done.
    As long as you are clear that this may fail!
    "Brass" is a very generic term for all kinds of zinc and copper containing metal alloys, so no guarantees that the brass I can practice on will behave like your gear....

    Cheers
    Joe
    Cheers, Joe
    retired - less energy, more time to contemplate projects and more shed time....

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney North Shore
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Thanks for the offer Joe.
    The problem is the clock is worth some decent $$$$$ and if this gear fails the clock is useless.
    think I”ll go down the Silver solder route.
    BTW clock gears are made from a specific brass called Alloy 353.

    Cheers

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Near Bendigo, Victoria, AUS
    Age
    69
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    Sounds like a safe plan.
    I'll post here how I go brazing brass, just for posterity....

    Cheers
    Joe
    Cheers, Joe
    retired - less energy, more time to contemplate projects and more shed time....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Near Bendigo, Victoria, AUS
    Age
    69
    Posts
    2,805

    Default

    Ok. First go at TIG brazing brass...
    Firstly, I have no idea what kind of brass alloy I have here. It is 2mm thick.
    Secondly, the temperature is very critical.
    The upside is that you can hear and see the zinc boiling and outgassing immediately when too hot.
    Silicon bronze seems to wet the surface easiest.
    Phosphor bronze just ball up on the surface.
    Aluminium bronze seems to fuse rather than braze.
    I even tried 15% silver solder. Which kind of works, but is impossible to keep at a low enough temperature with TIG.
    Lastly, ALL of the attempts melted the brass coupon right through behind the beads (last photo is the back side of the workpiece).
    I will try a few different kinds of brass scrap to see if they behave differently.
    My overall assessment after this first try is that there are too many variables to do this 'routinely'...
    I would certainly NOT try this on a valuable or critical piece!

    Cheers
    Joe
    Cheers, Joe
    retired - less energy, more time to contemplate projects and more shed time....

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,132

    Default

    Find some one close who can braze it with a torch, it is commonly done by watch makers, also re building teeth etc. I would do it except I am in SA.
    either way it will have to come out of the clock.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney North Shore
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    Find some one close who can braze it with a torch, it is commonly done by watch makers, also re building teeth etc. I would do it except I am in SA.
    either way it will have to come out of the clock.
    I am waiting on some other parts to come from Holland before getting it pulled down for repairs which will include the wheel/gear. Iím just forward planning at the moment.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney North Shore
    Posts
    11

    Default Gear repaired

    The clock gear has been repaired.

    D306584F-AEAE-4900-87BA-67F9B46DFE0E.jpg

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    melbourne
    Posts
    350

    Default

    Fantastic!
    But....
    How? Who? Where? 😁

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Sydney North Shore
    Posts
    11

    Default

    The old worn sections, which had been repaired before(brass pieces soft soldered in- actually visible in my first picture) were cut out and new brass sections silver soldered in.
    The guy did a great job.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    melbourne
    Posts
    350

    Default

    This is one of those situations where it is really important to know what you can do yourself cos you already know how, what you should have a go at because you probably know as much as anyone else, what would be a great skill to learn and failure is not a disaster, and when you have to find and trust an expert..

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,132

    Default

    Give the guy a plug for future reference.

Similar Threads

  1. Welding gear trolley
    By jhovel in forum WELDING
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 29th Sep 2014, 02:21 AM
  2. Welding brass with Mig ?
    By steve000 in forum WELDING
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 15th Mar 2009, 01:07 PM
  3. welding brass
    By Gaza in forum WELDING
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 7th Dec 2008, 10:59 AM
  4. Torch Welding Brass/Bronze
    By J.E. Mike Tobey in forum WELDING
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 22nd Feb 2008, 11:48 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •