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  1. #1
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    Oct 2015
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    Question Lathe stand - height

    In my eternal quest to create space in my shed, I have spied an opportunity.
    I have a set of drawers, about 300mm wide.
    This drawer unit is actually composed of 2 units welded one on top of the other.

    My cunning scheme is to separate the two, and use them as pillars for a new lathe stand.

    The lathe is a 'steel master' 9x20. It's currently sitting on a stand which I suspect is from a slightly larger lathe. Its construction is of folded metal, essentially a pillar at each end with a couple of shelves between. The shelves are not very efficient storage, and the pillars are basically inaccessible.
    The new drawer units (think narrow filing cabinets) are 900 high, plus a top, whereas the current stand is 730.
    So, the question : I'm 'average' height although I tend to prefer taller benches.
    Would a large stand at say 950 be too high?
    I reckon I'd gain a lot of useful storage, although I might lose a little in stand ridgity.

    Thanks for all opinions...

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
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    Hi Russ,

    That sounds like a plan ! I'm 5' 8" and could do with adding about 3" to the hight of my lathe. Same with the mill its table is 38" from the floor. Another two or three inches would be ideal. I also have a couple of duck boards which I don't use, simply because they make the working hight worse.

    One of the engineering works that I occasionally visit has their lathes on thick concrete slabs, but they all use duck boards there.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Adelaide
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    Iíll be at somewhere around 980 once I get the roll cab I have put aside under mine in an RHS frame. If itís taller than I like then Iíll look at making a duck board to take up the difference. Iím not overly tall at 5í11 but like my mill my lathe is too low for my liking. My Hercus 9 is on its original stand, as nice as it looks itís just really inefficient space wise if you consider I can fit a roll cab under it with room to spare. Good luck with your quest.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
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    melbourne
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    Thanks all.

    Great. Another project then...
    Any suggestions for a solid top? I think I have a piece of 50mm benchtop.
    OK? Or some sort of steel beam?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
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    The usual recommend height I've seen recommend is the cross-slide handle to be at elbow height.
    This way it's comfortable when winding which make sense.

    Personally on my 300x900 lathe I like it a little lower, from memory about 100mm otherwise the Chuck would be to high, but is is a bigger lathe than yours.
    I added 100mm plus adjustable feet to mine.
    Using Tapatalk

  6. #6
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    Sep 2012
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    North Yorkshire UK
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    Hi Russ, Guys,

    Maybe not quite the same ! I have a very heavy bench top drill press that I've mounted on top of a steel cabinet. The cabinet is one of those 30 inch square ones with a full size steel door.

    I've used a piece of 30 mm kitchen worktop on top and drilled through the fixing holes in the base of the drill to secure the whole lot. It is surprisingly rigid ! Though I must admit that I have a lot of extra weight on there in the form of an X-Y table also bolted down.

    So you could very well get away with your 50 mm thick bench top and some box section underneath. I used to have a six foot long two foot wide bench with a length of this worktop supported on 2" X 4" timber beams. It slowly started to bow under the weight of the drill press. I put a pair of legs underneath to add support, but was never happy with it.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  7. #7
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    Nov 2017
    Location
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    I'd say use the 50mm benchtop.
    I'm guessing its chipboard inside, so just make sure its sealed on all sides and seal any mounting holes/fasteners that you put into it or oil and coolant will get in and blow it up.

    Steve

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Mackay North Qld
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave J View Post
    The usual recommend height I've seen recommend is the cross-slide handle to be at elbow height.
    This way it's comfortable when winding which make sense.
    I agree with Dave J

    Grahame

  9. #9
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    Aug 2019
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    I am 178cm high, and have my Hercus's base at over 95cm high.

    I set the cross slide level with my elbow. I also mounted on a large beam instead of a thick bench base, so that there was plenty of room to wind the carriage along without scraping my knuckles on the inevitable tools and swarf.

    IMG_0047.jpg
    Last edited by nigelpearson; 16th Jan 2020 at 07:56 PM. Reason: thick base -> thick bench base

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Adelaide
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave J View Post
    The usual recommend height I've seen recommend is the cross-slide handle to be at elbow height.
    This way it's comfortable when winding which make sense.
    Completely down with the ergonomics of all this, but when youíre working in 28sqm like I am at the moment, if it means you can fit an extra roll cab worth of storage in by throwing the ideal measurements out the window and taking up the difference with duck boards and fatigue mats then thatís what is going to happen.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by racingtadpole View Post
    Completely down with the ergonomics of all this, but when youíre working in 28sqm like I am at the moment, if it means you can fit an extra roll cab worth of storage in by throwing the ideal measurements out the window and taking up the difference with duck boards and fatigue mats then thatís what is going to happen.
    It's totally up to you and what you want in your shed.
    The OP asked for what's everyones thoughts, it's up to him to take on what he thinks after all the suggestions.
    You do bring up a good point with duck boards, I only like stepping up an inch at the most, otherwise it becomes a trip Hazzard when walking arond in the shed past machines.

    I'm only in approximately 25 square meters and have got a lot of metal and wood machines in this small space,. Yes space is at a premium, but so is comfort for me when working on a machine for many hours.
    Using Tapatalk

  12. #12
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    Mar 2011
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    Adelaide
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave J View Post
    It's totally up to you and what you want in your shed.
    The OP asked for what's everyones thoughts, it's up to him to take on what he thinks after all the suggestions.
    You do bring up a good point with duck boards, I only like stepping up an inch at the most, otherwise it becomes a trip Hazzard when walking arond in the shed past machines.

    I'm only in approximately 25 square meters and have got a lot of metal and wood machines in this small space,. Yes space is at a premium, but so is comfort for me when working on a machine for many hours.
    So youíve just given me an idea....
    You raise a valid point about tripping over things, I figured on just leaning the board and mat against the front or tucking it down the side. Iím wondering about whether I can find enough room under it to put a slide out platform underneath...
    More thinking required.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by racingtadpole View Post
    So youíve just given me an idea....
    You raise a valid point about tripping over things, I figured on just leaning the board and mat against the front or tucking it down the side. Iím wondering about whether I can find enough room under it to put a slide out platform underneath...
    More thinking required.
    Never thought of that myself, but mine are usually full of swarf underneath, so would need cleaning up before sliding them as there plastic dangerous goods pallet bottoms which are gridded type of thing.

    If I'm in work mode it would get overlooked and left there. Some weeks I'm taking out buckets of swarf, not much shed time to half clean the lathe, nevermind the duck boards other than the magnetic pick-up tool.
    Using Tapatalk

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