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  1. #1
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    Default Re-boring a Cylinder Clevis

    A while back I purchased an elderly Dingo (a self-propelled hydraulic pump) for way too much money, and after pouring even more money and hydraulic fluid into it, have it in a reasonably serviceable state. Which brings me to the 4 in 1 bucket that came with it. I've previously posted about de-bending the floor of the bucket, and am now moving on to sorting out the rattly-as-hell pivots.

    Turning up some new bushes went reasonably well, apart from the god-awful mess bronze makes on the lathe, but I have one clevis end that is utterly chewed out as per the pic:

    IMG_2800.jpg

    I'm thinking if I could work out how get the end off, I could add some weld metal to the inside, chuck it up in the 4-jaw and drill/bore/ream it to size.

    Not sure if that's remotely realistic?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Murray Bridge S Aust.
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    Default

    Rather than trying to repair it, have you thought about making/fabricating a new one.
    My concern would be that the threaded section may distort.
    Filling it with weld should be OK, apart from my comment above.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    australia
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    Default

    Why not just bore it out and fit a steel sleeve/bush, press it into the clevis and it will last for years.
    If you added a bit of a chamfer to the bush you could even tack weld it in place, that would make it easy to replace next time by grinding the tack of and pushing the flogged one out, then start all over again.

    If you really wanted to go fancy, then add a bronze bush if you reckon you need it.


    psst, done plenty of repairs like this at one joint I used to work at, the boss seemed to attract customers who didn't quite have the readies to buy a new bit.
    So I was always fixing up and replacing somebodies flogged out bits from old dirt diggers of some form or other.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Healesville
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    Default

    Hi Rusty, I have used weld on ball joints for these repairs, you could cut off the worn one and weld one of these onto the threaded bush if you can find the right size, and probably get a longer service life, easy to lube and maybe reduce wear due to any misalignment problems.

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Replacem...EAAOSwjfdcTSeJ

    cheers, shed

    ps. Nice job on the bronze bush, not trying to be critical here but I don't think the bronze bushes will last very long, they will be too soft and flog out, particularly with the dirty/dusty work environment they are in.
    Bronze bushes are more suited to an oil soaked shaft spinning in them.
    I think a better option would be something like 4140 or maybe stainless bushes as it will work harden, then use a softer material for the pins as they are easily replaceable.

  5. #5
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    Nov 2009
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    australia
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    Default

    Just reminded me, I use to make the bushes from 41-40 and the pins from 10-20, for the very obvious reason as stated above by 'shedhappens'.

    It's far easier to replace a flogged pin, that a flogged bush.

  6. #6
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    Default

    Many thanks for the suggestions - always good to get some lateral thinking and advice from those with a great deal more experience than I have.

    In terms of my level of competence, I'm kind of taken with the idea of chewing out some more material with a die grinder, fitting some machined bushes, assembling the connection to line things up, and tack welding the bushes in place, followed by disassembly and more welding. That would take care of the centring/alignment issue, as it occurred to me that even if I managed to unscrew the clevis end of the cylinder rod and mount it up in something to re-bore it, I really have no idea where the hole was originally.

    The clevis on the other side of the bucket is still OK, so I guess I could somehow get measurements from that, but I think I like the idea of fitting it all together, as it should ensure things are aligned. I think.

    As for my rather handsome bronze bushes, that's what was there before:
    https://www.minidiggerwa.com.au/prod...es-dingo-4in1/

    The pivots for the bucket "jaws" had plastic composite bushes like these:
    https://www.minidiggerwa.com.au/prod...in-dingo-k934/

    But I made some up from bronze as well, as I needed the machine back in service.

    I'm curious as to what caused the clevis on one side to get chewed out so badly, while the other side is perfect.

  7. #7
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    sydney ( st marys )
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    Default

    Are both arms/joints getting the same pressure /load, is something bent, twisted so as not to produce equal loading?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Default

    The top of the holes looking at the orientation of the photo would be unworn as all it does is open the bucket.

    A quick and dirty method would be weld up the bottom of the holes and make it round with a rotary burr.

    Otherwise a new part (made from some gold alloy if bought from Dingo) or bore and bush.

    There is nothing to say, the clevis fitted to your ram is not original and someone broke one and replaced it with something they had lying around. From what I have seen, Dingo's cop a hell of a lot of abuse and get little respect from most operators that do not own them.

    Whether you can remove the ram is another thing, those bottom pins can be seized.
    Gold, the colour of choice for the discerning person.

  9. #9
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    Apr 2012
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    Healesville
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RustyArc View Post

    The pivots for the bucket "jaws" had plastic composite bushes like these:
    https://www.minidiggerwa.com.au/prod...in-dingo-k934/

    But I made some up from bronze as well, as I needed the machine back in service.
    It has been a while since I have worked on earth moving equipment, I suppose that it is a small machine and
    maybe they can get away with using those bushes but my guess is that they increase their fast moving parts line up profits by using them.

    Quote Originally Posted by RustyArc View Post
    I'm curious as to what caused the clevis on one side to get chewed out so badly, while the other side is perfect.
    The pin lock is probably missing.
    The pin should only rotate in the bush, it needs a tab welded to one end and something for it to lock into, see pic below for a sample.

    cheers, shed
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
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    Default

    The 3/4" pins that go through the clevis have fluting below the head that locks it into one side of the clevis (at least on the non-flogged side). Maybe this loosened off on the bad side and allowed the pin to rotate and start to deform the hole?

    The main pivots for the bucket jaws are 1" pins with tabs held in place with a bolt and nylock.

    The machine definitely is "special" - there's not a single grease nipple to be found, all the joints use the plastic composite bushes I linked to earlier.

    I bought the machine as I had about 1km of trenching to do, and it is a good trencher. I was planning to get rid of it once all my trenching was done, but it is handy for the odd thing, although the tyres absolutely shred the ground.

  11. #11
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    I had forgotten I had bored and bushed mine as well.

    https://metalworkforums.com/f65/t198...-3#post1898375
    Gold, the colour of choice for the discerning person.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by .RC. View Post
    I had forgotten I had bored and bushed mine as well.

    https://metalworkforums.com/f65/t198...-3#post1898375
    Oh wow, there you go. I'm thinking with my bodgy approach, I might not need to remove the clevis end from the rod, but if I do, how did you stop the rod from spinning?

  13. #13
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    Default

    Held it in my hand and used a 3/4" rattle gun to undo them.
    Gold, the colour of choice for the discerning person.

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