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  1. #31
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    Nov 2008
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    Perth WA
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    Quote Originally Posted by jack620 View Post
    Should he have a priest on site when doing this Bob? Backyard Phosphating

    Bob,
    Does your concrete floor have polythene underneath? If not, that would be where the moisture is coming from. Melbourne is considerably more moist than Perth and I get almost no corrosion on my tools and very little on my steel stock. You’ve got something going on there.
    Yes Chris, there is a polythene DPM under the concrete. The absence of insulation, open eaves and being located not more than a couple of hundred metres from the Baigup Wetlands along with the Swan River are probably the major contributors to my corrosion problems.

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  2. #32
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    melbourne australia
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    Yeah, that large body of water might have something to do with it. Backyard Phosphating
    Chris

  3. #33
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    Nov 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    I did a distance measurement on google earth and it's 300 odd meters difference, 700 for me and 400 for you. The other thing that might make a difference is the size of the land blocks. Where we are the small blocks means of the land is covered by roads and buildings whereas in your area with the bigger blocks there's more land to soak up and then evap water.
    To the Swan Bob. That swamp called the Baigup Wetlands is much closer. I would never have thought about a large block size having an adverse effect on the shed's contents. I just mentioned this to my wife and she said we aren't downsizing and that I can put up with the rust!!

  4. #34
    Join Date
    May 2008
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    Perth
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anorak Bob View Post
    A question for Bob.

    What would be the best way of neutralising the phosphoric acid to prevent continuing darkening of the metal?

    Bob.
    When I did a short course of spray painting, we'd give the panelwork a treatment of phosphoric acid, then rinse it off with plain water afterwards. Immediately after rinsing we would dry away the water with compressed air.

    Trainer got us to leave the first piece bare metal until we returned a week later, to see how it kept it all from rusting. The only piece that had any rust on it was one that someone had put their bare hand on afterwards, so there was a nice mildly rusty print on that one

  5. #35
    BobL is offline Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Quote Originally Posted by LordBug View Post
    When I did a short course of spray painting, we'd give the panelwork a treatment of phosphoric acid, then rinse it off with plain water afterwards. Immediately after rinsing we would dry away the water with compressed air.
    My experience is that water rinsed phosphoric acid treated steel surfaces will rust faster than if the PA is just blown off with a compressor.

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