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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Norwood-ish, Adelaide
    Age
    54
    Posts
    5,370

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RustyArc View Post
    ... there's no physical contact with the work, hence no inherent guiding of the cut...
    Use a strip of plywood or similar as a guide to run the side of the torch or nozzle along.

    Michael

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Adelaide
    Age
    64
    Posts
    1,150

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RustyArc View Post
    ... there's no physical contact with the work, hence no inherent guiding of the cut, ...
    The cutting tip on my Hypertherm is designed to be dragged along the work so it can be used with a straight-edge or template to guide the cut if required. Other makes may have the same ability.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    1,094

    Default

    I always use a straight edge, but I still find if I'm in an awkward position, I can wander off the edge without being aware of it.

    My cheap-arsed CUT 40 machine is fine with having the tip dragged along the surface, but I notice some more expensive units require a gap, and typically provide an attachment to maintain the spacing. Haven't worked out what's different with these machines.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    53

    Default

    I invested in a Tanjant straight-line guide and a circle guide, not cheap but good quality gear that's made in Melbourne & and sold world wide. I've got a MetalMaster 215 TIG/Plasma machine so I just added the insert that fits this torch. I tend to use it a lot for sheet metal cutting, beautiful clean cut as I can set cutting angles and height. Handy too for doing bevel cuts for thicker steel where multi-pass welding is required. The Tanjants come with suction pads as well the standard magnets so I can use them on stainless, aluminium etc where magnets don't work. I soon recovered the initial purchase cost in speed and accuracy.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Age
    53
    Posts
    544

    Default

    Been using the Aldi cutter again today. Had to cut some old brackets off my yard crane and fan new ones to fit a different steering box.
    A few layers of paint etc. Cut it OK, but struggles in the thicker radiused corner of 6mm angle.



    This 1.6mm painted sheet was like butter (freehand).



    Reasonably clean cut on 6mm



    Steve

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