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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    near Rockhampton
    Posts
    5,952

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eskimo View Post

    SAPOL have the right to roll up unannounced and do so. Anything related to firearms also give them the right to enter and search etc. Even suspicion of firearms related stuff also give them this right.
    Probably but do you have to assist them. If the cabinet is locked do you have to open it? it is rather rude if they rock up unannounced and order a search.

    While this did happen to me in Qld. I did pass and as it was the local policeman I did not have an issue. Be different if it was some unknowns.
    Gold, the colour of choice for the discerning person.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Athelstone, SA 5076
    Posts
    3,959

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by .RC. View Post
    but do you have to assist them. If the cabinet is locked do you have to open it? it is rather rude if they rock up unannounced and order a search.
    I would...they act first and answer later. Probably have your licensed suspended meaning you cant be in possession of firearms, which will result in your safe being broken open/removed or whatever as you'd be considered to not being a "fit and proper person"

    Those words are in the ACT.

    You'll never get you licence or guns back..not without a long fight anyways.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,113

    Default

    My property can only be entered ( without break and enter) by invitation only so any one wishing to enter must contact me and make a appointment, if that person has
    good reason then I will assist. I have never had any problem with SA Police they have always been polite and carried out their Job. They are only really after the persons who flaunt the regulations.
    While I do not agree with many of the regulations it is not the officers who are tasked with enforcing the regs that I have issue with it is the seat shiners making them.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Location
    Australia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    11

    Default Spring compression

    Here in WA your required to remove the bolt and store separately.
    That just means in the same gun safe, but locked separately in the small top section. I keep magazines in with the bolts locked separately.
    You can’t keep ammo locked in the safe with the firearms - that has to be stored separately also (& comply with mines act regulations, ie inside a wooden box locked inside a metal container like a toolbox with hasp & staple & padlock).
    If you do remove your rifle bolt / s from the rifle - you have to cock the bolt to remove it & this compresses the firing pin spring (different on old .303’s, where it’s closing the bolt that cocks it not lifting the bolt handle to open it).

    If you do remove your bolt for storage, with mine I can lower the handle after the bolt is removed and this puts the firing pin in the fired position where the spring is not compressed.
    This helps prevent weakening your firing pin spring by leaving it stored compressed for long periods.
    It also has the benefit that if say a child or someone unfamiliar with firearms got hold of the rifle & the bolt, unless they know how to cock the handle with the bolt out of the action - they won’t be able to get it into the receiver & this might help prevent anyone accidentally discharging it or worse using it on you or your family.
    I also employ trigger locks as well.
    Your also required to store reloading gun powder and primers in accordance with mines act for explosives, and your restricted on the quantity you can legally store at home (3kg’s total).
    There’s probably slight variations for other states.
    Ohh and just for those unaware now, any ammunition component including unprimed brass or fired brass, is classified under the act as a “firearm” so the components also have to be locked away, eg empty brass & projectiles, it’s not just your powder & primers.
    It’s getting tougher & tougher.
    Pretty soon you will likely have to put in returns for how many rounds you reload & store, probably be limits on that to, because Firearms branch can keep an eye on your ammo purchases via the Gunshops returns - but if your reloading - you could be hoarding ammo or supplying it illegally to others who might not have a license to legally buy it from a gunshop for eg.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    265

    Default

    I've noticed differences between the states in the firearm legislation - what is ok in one state is frowned upon in another state. No need to remove the bolt in SA, I remove bolts but store them in a hidden location I figure if a thief can break into the gun safe then getting into the small top ammo storage section isn't any harder. A friend had his Brno Mod 2 (purchased new in 1960 when he was 12) stolen - the thieves cut the barrel and stock and tried to hold up a post office - they were caught a short time later - this was no consolation for my friend.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    114

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by .RC. View Post
    Probably but do you have to assist them. If the cabinet is locked do you have to open it? it is rather rude if they rock up unannounced and order a search...
    I for one am all for random checks. The Police constantly do random checks on our vehicle rego as we are driving around so I see no reason why to resist checking firearms. Guns appear to be getting more common in our country (un-fact checked fact ) and anything that can be done to keep everything above board should only be commended. Australia has always been a safe country in terms of gun crime and I am sure nobody would like to see the country head down the route of the US of A. Every legal firearm held by a responsible shooter needs to be correctly secured in order to ensure that they do not fall into the hands of the people who don't want to use them responsibly or legally.

    No I am not a greeny tree hugging hippie, just an ex-rifle shooter who cares deeply for his country and society.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jul 2020
    Location
    Australia
    Age
    61
    Posts
    11

    Default Law Abiding

    I suspect most law abiding firearms owners wouldn’t object to having their firearms safe inspected in order to keep the Firearms register up to date etc.
    The only minor worry might be whether you comply to all the minor nuances of the less obvious things like mines act compliance for ammo storage & reloading components etc.
    As best I understand it Police Officers can enforce all acts so Mines act as well for eg.
    I’ve not heard of anyone being charged as long as their guns are in the safe, unloaded with bolt & magazine out & ammo stored separate, for the minor stuff.
    As long as you dont get the Police offside by being difficult to get along with you should be OK.
    Now if your gun safe is in the same room as your hydroponic mull crop, then THAT might be a different story! 😂🙄

    A tale of caution, when it comes to gun safes tho, specifically buying them used off social media.

    Recently here in the West we had a spate of home invasions (3) where firearms were specifically targeted, during break & enters when no one was home.

    The weird thing that was common between all 3 robberies - no damage to the safe!

    So in the end it turned out an “enterprising” couple of likely lads took to selling used firearm safes on social media.

    When the buyer showed up to inspect & buy, only one set of keys were available, with the excuse that the other set were somehow misplaced and if they turned up in a search of the house they would be forwarded later by mail.
    And of course suggesting just get a second set of keys cut to match the set supplied with the safe.

    So the buyers were unwittingly giving the sellers their home address.

    The sellers then watched the house for when no one was home & after breaking in, used the 2nd set of keys they had deliberately kept, to open the safe & take the firearms.
    They then locked the safe behind themselves in the hope it wouldn’t be noticed for some time to the owner that they were even missing - giving the thieves time to dispose of them illegally for cash.

    It was only the commonality between 3 separate thefts where the safes were still locked but the firearms were missing that eventually brought the perpetrators undone, when it emerged that all 3 victims had recently bought used gun safes online off social media.

    The Police worked out all 3 safes had been bought from the same pair of likely lads & that in all 3 cases only 1 set of keys were supplied with the safe, and a promise made to forward the missing set of / when they showed up, requiring the buyers to leave details of their address.

    So word to the wise, don’t buy used gun safes online from social media - with only 1 set of keys & DONT leave your address with them. 😉👍

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