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  1. #1456
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    N.W.Tasmania
    Posts
    1,218

    Default

    Looks great Richard, and very useful for many simple indexing jobs. As you say, much lighter and easier to handle than a big dividing head too. You should get the vacuum cleaner out though, and do a quick clean-up, because your photos are definitely unsanitary compared to BT's. I s'pose you blame that rust on your recent cyclonic weather.

  2. #1457
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Australia east coast
    Age
    68
    Posts
    2,623

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ropetangler View Post
    You should get the vacuum cleaner out though, and do a quick clean-up, because your photos are definitely unsanitary compared to BT's. I s'pose you blame that rust on your recent cyclonic weather.
    Ha ha - you've seen my shop, I think Richard's has nowhere near enough swarf lying about the place, personally. He's obviously spending more time chasing cows than working......

    PDW

  3. #1458
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    near Rockhampton
    Posts
    6,001

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PDW View Post
    Ha ha - you've seen my shop, I think Richard's has nowhere near enough swarf lying about the place, personally. He's obviously spending more time chasing cows than working......

    PDW
    Making that backing plate for the chuck was the first time in months I have done anything meaningful in the shed..
    Gold, the colour of choice for the discerning person.

  4. #1459
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Laidley, SE Qld
    Posts
    941

    Default Optical Comparator

    I need to cut an internal thread to suit a funny angle thread on a suspension bush, first step is to find the thread angle so I can grind a tool.

    I used my acroVu optical comparator for the first time to determine the thread angle. Turns out to be 150. Pretty cool actually. Magnification is 20X






  5. #1460
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Near Bendigo, Victoria, AUS
    Age
    69
    Posts
    2,863

    Default Making an etching/printing press

    My darling Pam attended a workshop two weeks ago on printing natural objects - with her particular interest in printing leaves and feathers etc onto woven fabrics and her own felted farbics.
    The key tool was a roller press. $1000s
    She told me last Sunday (April 20th): "For my birthday present I'd really like a press ...." (Birthday: April 26th)
    So I spent half the night researching what was involved and if it was possible for me to make one for her.....
    Anyway, Monday I looked around my shed to see what materials I had on hand and what I would have to purchase if I took up the challenge.
    I seemed to have all the steel required - just in a different shape to what was needed.... I went for a drive to the local bearing service and purchased some suitable bearings and flange and sliding mounts and the nuts and bolts I thought I would need. The local junk yard (Bendigo Trailers and Hardware) yielded a find of a huge cast iron valve handwheel and a suitable piece of laminated MDF.
    By 1am that morning a few bits started taking shape on the lathe. The photos show some of the materials used: sections of a weight lifting bar, some 4" and 2-1/2" water pipe, some round 1/2" thick disk offcuts, a short offcut of 3" diameter solid, a decent piece of 1/2" flat plate I had to cut in half, some 2"x1/2" flat bar and some 5/8" round bar pieces I had.
    I used a couple of M16 rod joiners (extra long hex nuts) and some M16 allthread left over from another project for the height adjustment.
    The table giude wheels were cut with a circle cutter out of a piece of 12mm thick Pheolic sheet I was given some years ago. The plugs were then drilled to suit the 5/8" spindles and turned to the size required.
    Tuesday I cut the waterpipe pieces for the rollers and welded the ends and the spindles in. I cut all the steel to size and layed out the holes and welds to be done.
    I then discovered that the size selected for the rollers was right on the end of the capacity of my lathe - tailstock only half on the bed. A quick attempt showed that the chatter was uncontrollable - bugger. So I visited my friend Peter and his Sheraton. Around midnight one of the rollers was finished beautifully! Wednesday night the other one. I also managed to weld the sideplates and yokes and drill all the holes that day. By Thursday, Pam says "well, have you given my printing press any more thought?" I replied casually "yeah, I though about it. Should be an interesting project..."
    That day I turned and threaded the tie bars and gave all the frame parts a coat of primer. Friday I checked all my measurements and tried a few parts carefully for fit as the primer dried off. I also gave the sideplates and yokes a first coat of gloss. Saturday I painted all the parts, cut out the table and sealed the edges and laser printed some labels for the machine.
    Late Saturday night, with the paint still soft but dry, I moved all the parts into her studio and started to assemble the machine. I got most of it together, but a couple of bearing fits were too tight (it turned out the locating grub screws were just sticking into the bore by a smidgeon but I was too buggered to notice. And I started scratching the paint in a few places working by myself. So I left the whole thing looking almost complete at first glance. I even put the lables on 'Pam's Printing Press' and 'Printing press - 2015'
    Sunday morning Pam went into her studio and nearly had a heart attack. She woke me up and thanked me profusely and asked how I managed to find one exactly the size she wanted??? When I told her I made it she said I was BS-ing, she said she saw the manufacturer's label on it. I suggested she go and READ the label
    Well, that made her even more excited. She was over the moon.
    I explained what happened the night before and that I would assemle it properly shortly.
    We talked about corrosion control at some point and I passed on Peter's suggestion of having the rollers nickel plated. She thought that would be a good idea, given the wet environment in the studio some of the time.
    So during this week I had the rollers plated - great job by the way - and made a mobile stand for it as well as sorting out the fits.
    Today it got reassembled and tested. Working like a charm! A couple of minor bits yet to be fitted to allow lifting the top roller (little collars to be turned and fitted to the adjusting screws) and fixing the machine to the trolley.....
    Here are the pics:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Cheers, Joe
    retired - less energy, more time to contemplate projects and more shed time....

  6. #1461
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    York, North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    4,447

    Default

    Good grief Joe,

    If my missus sees this, she will want to know what I'm doing spending all my time in the shed...

    Nice work !
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  7. #1462
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Norwood-ish, Adelaide
    Age
    56
    Posts
    5,721

    Default

    Nice one Joe - and with split second timing too.

    Michael

  8. #1463
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Sutherland Shire, Sydney
    Age
    68
    Posts
    65

    Default Great job

    Crikey, that kept you busy. Well done, and a very enjoyable write-up.
    You will have Brownie points to spare for quite some time to come.

    Alan...

  9. #1464
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Perth WA
    Age
    68
    Posts
    6,284

    Default

    What a fantastic job Joe!

    Your resurrection and re-purposing skills are an inspiration.

    Bob.

  10. #1465
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Glenbrook NSW Australia
    Posts
    125

    Default

    A great job, well executed with on hand materials with a tight time frame and a happy client...........
    Like to see some of Pams prints, was thinking of doing something similar awhile back. Does she post pics anywhere?
    vapourforge.com

  11. #1466
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    gold coast
    Posts
    282

    Default

    What an awesome build and in such a short timeframe. You are the man!
    and to think I've spent a week just working on turning one small shaft for a gear for my lathe.
    I'm pretending it's the journey, not the destination.

  12. #1467
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    N.W.Tasmania
    Posts
    1,218

    Default

    Really great work Joe, especially considering the time frame restraint too. Looks like you're in for a happy life! Best wishes,
    Rob.
    P.S. Great scrounging too, that handwheel really looks the part, no wonder she thought you were b/sing her about the manufacturing bit. R.

  13. #1468
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Near Bendigo, Victoria, AUS
    Age
    69
    Posts
    2,863

    Default

    Thanks guys for the comments!
    Rusel, she has a website, showing her work, but as yet no 'press' prints, only contact prints from steaming leaves on her felt:
    www.rawedgetextiles.com - I reckon she does magic work....

    I designed and built her prototype felt rolling machine too, 7 years ago. It's been running for about 4000hrs. Has worn out two motors and is now running on a 24V DC motor with PWM speed control since around 3 years without any signs of motor wear. The issue was that it has to reverse every minute or so. The previous 2 motors didn't like that.
    Cheers, Joe
    retired - less energy, more time to contemplate projects and more shed time....

  14. #1469
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
    Age
    68
    Posts
    4,781

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jhovel View Post
    Thanks guys for the comments!
    Rusel, she has a website, showing her work, but as yet no 'press' prints, only contact prints from steaming leaves on her felt:
    www.rawedgetextiles.com - I reckon she does magic work....

    I designed and built her prototype felt rolling machine too, 7 years ago. It's been running for about 4000hrs. Has worn out two motors and is now running on a 24V DC motor with PWM speed control since around 3 years without any signs of motor wear. The issue was that it has to reverse every minute or so. The previous 2 motors didn't like that.
    Hi Joe, great work on that machine, my partner saw it and says it look great. Any chance of some pictures of the rolling machine, as my partner is into felting also, and has mentioned to me on more than several occasions, that she would like one.
    Kryn

  15. #1470
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    near Rockhampton
    Posts
    6,001

    Default

    Picked up this today.... Indian made Ruston 3YWA... 15kva single phase only dunlite generator.... Surprisingly the generator has electronic voltage regulation, it dates from the early 1980's i think, it was used on a rural property until they had mains connected in 1984, then sat doing nothing until today... Engine not running very well, it has problems...

    http://youtu.be/8IMAeTEdLyI

    20150502_133716.jpg
    Gold, the colour of choice for the discerning person.

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