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  1. #1
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    Default Machining in Southern Asia

    These guys are amazing - and it is all done with basic tooling. The chips are flying: it looks like a cast iron crankshaft ? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-inYCr-fV3Q

    Then again. I have bought a Indian made clone of a Lister CS engine and the two keyways machined in the crankshaft for the flywheels were way out of alignment, and so were the flywheel keyways - very badly misaligned. I had to make up bespoke gib keys which I could never get to fit 100% correctly. The camshaft setup needed a few mods, others have written all this up in various forums dealing with Indian made Listeroid engines.

    The cranks in the video are for a Massey Ferguson tractor 3 cylinder Perkins engine. https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/38307589...SABEgJQaPD_BwE

  2. #2
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    May 2011
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    Murray Bridge S Aust.
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    Default

    Thanks for the video link MM, a very interesting documentary. The building is something else, not what I thought it would be like.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Mackay North Qld
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by morrisman View Post
    Then again. I have bought a Indian made clone of a Lister CS engine and the two keyways machined in the crankshaft for the flywheels were way out of alignment, and so were the flywheel keyways - very badly misaligned. I had to make up bespoke gib keys which I could never get to fit 100% correctly. The camshaft setup needed a few mods, others have written all this up in various forums dealing with Indian made Listeroid engines.
    I am not surprised when you consider the step on the factory video where the keyways were cut on the Cincinatti mill.
    The operator used a carpenter square off the bed and edge diameter of the journal spigot and used outside calipers to check for checking the equidistant dimensions. A chance of a lump of swarf under square to bed interface, so the measurement would be thrown off.

    Grahame

  4. #4
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    Nov 2017
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    Geelong, Australia
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    Default

    Thanks.
    Aside from the cringeworthy safety side (would make a good example vid for training) I thought it was a good example of machining process order etc.

    Steve

  5. #5
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    Dec 2005
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    South Australia
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    Default

    I clearly have a different definition of "amazing".

  6. #6
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    Apr 2018
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    Drouin Vic
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    Default

    Amazing what can be achieved without those pesky OH&S people constantly peering over your shoulder! And that factory appears to possess not just one, but two, actual dial gauges!

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Sydney, NSW
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    Default

    Interesting video. I really feel like sending them a box of safety glasses. I don't think all that graphite (I think it is) that's smeared over the hands of the lathe operator in Step 2 would be good for you long term.

    Ben.

  8. #8
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    Mar 2014
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    South of Adelaide
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    I clearly have a different definition of "amazing".
    My thoughts exactly. I now understand why the quality of after market tractor parts are so poor, i have to rework about 30% of the parts i buy.

  9. #9
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    Jul 2008
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    near Warragul, Victoria
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    Default Metallurgy

    I would like to know what the grade of alloy is the cranks are cast with - for all we know it could be recycled engine blocks, whatever it is it appears to machine easily.

    There must be a great number of old MF tractors still in use to justify the effort of making new crankshafts but I guess the guys who are actually making them in that video are not paid that well.

    New WW2 Jeep engine blocks are being cast in China , reports indicate the new blocks are somewhat less than ideal and quite a bit of remedial work needs to be done to make them useable.

  10. #10
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    Feb 2013
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    Laidley, SE Qld
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    Default

    The video (the uploader has several more) shows the reality of life and machining in that part of the world.
    I'm not going to have smug sneer at their practices from the comfort of a first world country.

  11. #11
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    Jul 2006
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    Athelstone, SA 5076
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    Default

    can anyone explain to me how the "dial indicator" (hahaha) works in step 2?

  12. #12
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    Nov 2017
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eskimo View Post
    can anyone explain to me how the "dial indicator" (hahaha) works in step 2?
    Just a visual indicator - if the gap at the end doesnít change or the end come off the part the itís running concentric.
    All a typical dial indicator does is magnify that change, but those old gauges are fine for a rough setup and I believe were quite common back in early 20th century.

    Steve

  13. #13
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    Default Yes

    Quote Originally Posted by bob ward View Post
    The video (the uploader has several more) shows the reality of life and machining in that part of the world.
    I'm not going to have smug sneer at their practices from the comfort of a first world country.
    Yes very true. And those chaps don't stand around talking that much, it is flat out work . They probably get paid on a piece rate , the more you produce the more you are paid which would be a fraction of the amount we would be paid here. When you think about it, as recently as the 1940s many factories in Britain were not health and safety conscious even employing 14 year old kids in highly hazardous work- 14 year old kids in coal mines was common.

  14. #14
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    Apr 2018
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    Drouin Vic
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    Default

    Yes smug sneering is easy for sure, but those men are working very hard in difficult conditions and no doubt serious injuries are common; however is also shows why a product built that way is never going to be comparable in quality to one built in modern facilities with modern equipment. Worth bearing in mind when we complain about the cost of stuff made here.

  15. #15
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    Aug 2019
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    Revesby - Sydney Australia
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    Default

    Many things there amused me;

    1. First lathe operator used 2 "safety features."
      A little bit of cardboard on the back of the toolpost to stop chips flying into his face,
      and a rag to remove the tailstock drill/centre after machining (hot metal?)
    2. Second lathe operator took tools in and out of 4way toolpost quite a few times.
      Instead of leaving two in there permanently and rotating it around!
    3. Second lathe operator used verniers as go/no-go diameter gauge,
      to see if journals were close to finished size.
      I'm guessing the cross slide graduations are too covered in cast iron chips to read
    4. Lathe chucks on the drill presses. Never seen that before!
    5. Tapping at "full speed" without a fancy clutch/reversing tapping head.
    6. Grinding cast seams off the crank - angle grinder actually still had a guard fitted!
      And, a number of jawless lathe chucks on his bench, used as heavy bases to put the crank in for grinding.
    7. Shot peening machine looks positively modern.
    8. Horiz. mill cutting the keyway. Shaft and cutter were visibly wobbling around.
    9. Coolant in the crankshaft grinder!
      (and a younger worker to load/unload the cranks)
    10. Video is sped up a lot.
      41 minutes would be over 70 (and no-one would watch it?) if shown at actual speed.




    I wonder if there is a cast iron (rough steel) foundry on the other side of one of those walls?

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