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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Sydney, NSW
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    Default Where's the pivot point?

    Hi,

    I want to make one of these sooner or later:


    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/14420524...r=443500729869


    I'm think the pivot point is at the top of the tool (near the handle) but not sure. The more I look at it, the more I'm not sure it'll work. What does everyone think?

    Ben.

  2. #2
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    Aug 2011
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    Melbourne
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    Default

    The pivot point seems to be at the lower horizontal bar where you see the pins.

    Actually, the pivot it at the top of the tool where those pins are.

    The threaded screw pulls the bottom horizontal bar upwards and forces the bottom pincers together.

    Simon

    Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
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    Geelong, Australia
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    1,779

    Default Where's the pivot point?

    I agree Simon - pivot at the top pins.

    For $20 delivered Iím assuming you either already have all the materials and plenty of time, or are just doing it because you want a project.

    Steve

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Australind , WA
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    1,067

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by simonl View Post
    The pivot point seems to be at the lower horizontal bar where you see the pins.

    Actually, the pivot it at the top of the tool where those pins are.

    The threaded screw pulls the bottom horizontal bar upwards and forces the bottom pincers together.

    Simon

    Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
    Picture shows the puller in its fully operated position. Bottom beam would be next to the chains otherwise. Correct?

    Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sterob View Post
    Picture shows the puller in its fully operated position. Bottom beam would be next to the chains otherwise. Correct?

    Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
    I think that's the case. Unwinding the handle (anticlockwise) opens the jaws wider.

    Simon

    Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Mallacoota,VIC,Australia
    Age
    51
    Posts
    933

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by simonl View Post
    The pivot point seems to be at the lower horizontal bar where you see the pins.

    Actually, the pivot it at the top of the tool where those pins are.

    The threaded screw pulls the bottom horizontal bar upwards and forces the bottom pincers together.

    Simon

    Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
    Totally agree, and the pins in the lower bar from what I can tell are only there as stoppers to stop the arms spreading out to far. So those pins touch, but don't go through the arms at all. I wish I had one of those 30 odd years ago when I used to ride motorbikes, would've saved a bit of grief at times.
    All The Best steran50 Stewart

    The shortest way to do many things is to do only one thing at once.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bendigo
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    57
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    188

    Default

    The pictures of the tool shows the lower bar is movable and can even over centre the crest in the legs so depends on where the bar is on if screwing in or out closes the legs.
    Pivots at the top.
    pic.jpg

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    York, North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    4,978

    Default

    Hi Guys,

    The tool relies on the threaded rod to keep the bars parallel to each other. Turning the screw clock wise pushes the bar away pulling the ends of the chain together. Often a very similar tool can be seen pulling the ends of traction engine chain links together ! And those can be very heavy !
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Mallacoota,VIC,Australia
    Age
    51
    Posts
    933

    Default

    Here links to two videos on YouTube showing how the device works https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQkdS9o-y_o and this one shows an actual chain How to connect Tsubaki Roller Chain that is not on a sprocket - YouTube . I looked at the videos and the internal thread is only in the top beam which means the bottom beam is only a follower so to speak.
    All The Best steran50 Stewart

    The shortest way to do many things is to do only one thing at once.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Melbourne
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    Default

    Isn't it set up incorrectly in the large picture and correctly in the lower three?

  11. #11
    Join Date
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Stustoys View Post
    Isn't it set up incorrectly in the large picture and correctly in the lower three?
    Good question.

    I guess it ultimately depends on whether the threaded bolt is designed to work in compression or tension.

    The top photo the threaded rod works in tension, turning anticlockwise. The bottom photos shows it set up to work in compression by turning clockwise.

    Simon

    Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Sydney, NSW
    Posts
    1,247

    Default

    Thanks for the replies.

    It would be cheaper and easier (and will what I probably end up doing) just buying one from ebay. The tool looks simple and easy to use. I thought it might be a good little project to make at work if I ever get back there. After watching the youtube video I feel stupid for not understanding how it worked.

    Here's some video's of what it will be used on:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlg4M7o-UUM

    and

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iD_cHDjGNJc

    At least once a year we take off chains etc. and it's the same fun time trying to re-fit super tight chains with pliers or screwdrivers and saying we have to come up with a better way.

    Regards

    Ben.

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