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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
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    Eastern Suburbs Melbourne
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    Default Transporting oxy-acetylene

    I need to move my oxy-acetylene bottles a short distance about 1 km as iím moving. I only have a sedan to move it so am thinking of putting it in the boot, have read of safety concerns but opinions divided about how the safety of lying bottles down and the potential risks involved. Any thoughts?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Newcastle
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    Default

    1km only? Put them on a cart and walk them.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    Helensburgh
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    Default

    I transported O/A a fair bit and yes they can be laid down but the Acetylene must not be used for a few hours to let the liquid settle to the bottom of the bottle before using it. I am sure the transport regs say they can't be transported in a car also.
    CHRIS

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Mackay North Qld
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    Default

    Hi Tiger,
    As mentioned above. Not in a car. Not legally!

    Got a mate with an open back ute?

    Below is some guidance about the regs.

    https://www.airliquidehealthcare.com...r_products.pdf

    This is what a vehicular acetylene gas explosion can do:

    https://my.firefighternation.com/for...ll-cylinder-of

    Grahame

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Eastern Suburbs Melbourne
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    Default

    Thanks guys, they are the E size so theyíre heavy enough but i had considered just walking them across, be a slow walk though.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    NSW
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    427

    Default

    Nope. Nope. Nope.
    Flammable DG class 2.1 like acetylene are not to be transported in an enclosed vehicle.
    They (acetylene) need to be transported upright. They are liquid filled (acetylene and acetone dissolved in a porus mass within the cylinder), so laying it down would render the cylinder safety devices (relief valve or fusible plug) ineffective.
    Any regulators need to be removed prior to transport too.

    The details are in the DG legislation, a good guide is provided by ANZIGA (Aus/NZ industrial gas association). Some things are different for commercial transport vs 'own use' but this mainly relates to records (DG manifest etc).

    Australia New Zealand Industrial Gas Association is one of the regulatory bodies with some useful info.

    About carrying in vehicles (refer to the DG class 2.1 stuff for acetylene, 2.2/5.1 for oxygen).
    http://anziga.org/public/editor_imag...n_vehicles.pdf


    And just because
    http://anziga.org/public/editor_imag...etylene%29.pdf

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    near Rockhampton
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    Default

    The law says you should not speed either.

    Before we say the law is the law, ask yourself why it is written that way. To me it is the same as the old one rule for absolutely situation because that is very easy to do and who cares who it inconveniences as the ones making the law will most likely never be encumbered by it.

    So the person transporting it 100m is considered the same as the person transporting it 100 000km.

    Does anyone think the rule was made because of leakage issues. If it was transported in an enclosed area and leaked, when you open the boot there is a chance an explosion could ensue from an ignition source, like the boot light switch arcing.

    If it was adequately contained so the tap can not be knocked, no leakage with a bubble test, well..... You still can not do it.
    Gold, the colour of choice for the discerning person.

  8. #8
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
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    Perth
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    Default

    Interestingly the BOC guidelines state.
    Use open vehicles or trailers in preference to any enclosed vehicles or trailers.
    Why do they say "preference" instead of "Do not use"?

    Anyway I'm surprised no one has mentioned a trailer. You just need one with a sturdy tallish cage.

    And picking up on RCs point, here are some other significant factors to consider that could mitigate risk.
    Drive at the quietest time of day on road - that's usually very early morning around our way.
    Drive slowly - KE=1/2mv^2
    And has already been mentioned, drive with boot propped open.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Athelstone, SA 5076
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    Default

    reasons why they tell you how to transport them.

    They dont want the valves to be broken off or you'll have a rocket on you hands..especially oxy, and for acet a bomb!

    stand and chained vertically and in open vehicle...

    having said that there are plenty of tradies with cylinders in vans and some not fastened in vertical position...been a one or two vehicle explosions as well...

    so the risk is real but slight...... if nothing goes wrong

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
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    Default

    Is it just the acetylene that is an issue?

    BOC had no issues with me transporting an oxygen cylinder in the boot, this was about 20 years back.

    But what happens in an accident? Probably not the best idea.

  11. #11
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    Back in the good old days when my daily earner was strucual steel onsite fabrication i made made a
    rule that there was no smoking in the van until driving 1 klm with the window down.
    Another rule i had was to ensure the valves on the gas bottles were off.
    cheers, shed

  12. #12
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    Default

    back in the 90s, I used to collect the bottles from BOC for my dad panels shop, we just put them in the panel van to drive back not issue and no one cared.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Melbourne
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    The main risk of explosion in an enclosed space is a slow undetected leak over a long period of time. Putting a cylinder in your car and immediately driving 1km will have virtually nil risk of explosion from any leak. Theres just not enough time to build up a flammable mix, even though acetylene has a very broad flammable limit making it one of the most dangerous gases. Up there with hydrogen.

    I can't comment on the risks of laying them down for the 5 mins the trip would take as I'm rather ignorant of that part.

    When I go camping I try to always carry our lpg bottle external, usually on the roof rack. This is for the same reason as above. Having said that, I'm happy to put them in the car for the short time it takes when I get them filled.

    Simon

    Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
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    Default

    I have transported oxy And acetylene hundreds of times laying down with no issue in the boot BOC don't seem to have any concern, well as of last week any way, loaded the acetylene in to the boot for me.
    as said above you don't use the acetylene laying down or it will draw off liquid instead of gas, just stand it up for 15mins before use.

    I am not telling or suggesting for anyone to go against any regulations or laws I am only laying out my experience

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Syd
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eskimo
    They dont want the valves to be broken off or you'll have a rocket on you hands..especially oxy, and for acet a bomb!
    I'd be more worried about a heavy object projectile, than valve failure, seem to recall fire extinguisher brackets were supposed to be designed to take 25G to be any good in a car accident....imagine what you'd need to stop, say, something around 50kg in a big bottle. The valves must be fairly robust, the crew used to drop them from the harbour bridge deck to the ground at Milsons Point back in the day before all the safety precautions. That Russian traffic accident several years ago, with all the carnage and the bottles taking off in all directions, quietly amazed they all didn't go off at once with all the explosions and especially the heat, which I thought would have melted the valve quick smart.

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