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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    Default Looking for inspiration

    Been feeling at a bit of a loose end lately and decided that I need another challenge, so I've decided to venture yet again into the world of sheet metal, probably in aluminium.
    Some of you may remember the bling toolbox I made. It's doing nicely but I'd like a bit more extra space, so...
    P1040178.JPG
    I had a look on the net and picked up a few photos. If anyone has another interesting design, then please post. I'm looking for something around 500mm or less wide. These days that segment of the market is a plastic box, no drawers. Being an orderly type, I'd prefer shallow drawers so there is one layer, no tangling.
    The first is a basic box design. I don't really favour this type because the tools are mainly jumbled in the bottom
    basic.jpg
    The next few are a basic drawer type. The first one (Beta) is Italian, and I like that look but apart from being expensive it looks like it wastes a bit of volume with the recesses. The next is a Kennedy from the US. With the sputter coating I think it looks very classy. The last is the tool box I took to TAS. All of these have a mechanism to lock the drawers when the lid is down (Correction - the Kennedy has a flap that hinges up - very similar to my daily use Sidchrome box. The problem with that flap is that you have to have a clear space infront of the box to open)
    Beta.jpg kennedy 526.jpg P1040339.JPG
    The next is a variation of these, but with a flap on the lid, so no mechanism involved to secure
    front flap.jpg
    A couple of cantilever types. 1st is an old Rota - interesting but getting things from the base could be tricky. Then there is the 3 row box. I'm not too keen on this style as once the pivots start to wear they get a bit floppy. When carrying, the weight of the box is supported through these cantilever links, although there is another style with a bucket type handle.
    rota 1.jpg cantilever.jpg
    Lastly a few more novel boxes. The first is a combined stool/ box. There is a version with larger wheels on one end, so I suppose you could move it like a sack truck (a tempting project). Then there is a tool cart, complete with hydraulic brakes. Too big for me, but the wheels are cool. Finally there is a '40's box from the US. Totally impractical for my wants but a wonderful shape.
    Stool.jpg Extreme_Tools_Pit_Box.jpg torpedo.jpg
    Anyway, if anyone has any other shapes or mechanisms that appeal or are a bit out of the ordinary, then please post.

    Michael
    Last edited by Michael G; 20th Sep 2019 at 08:21 AM. Reason: Correction

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Inspiration part II

    With drawers, there needs to be some way of getting them out. The Bling box had a welded recess and the TAS box had welded on stirups. Only chests of drawers I have a pop up handle like this, although mine are hardware shop specials in pressed brass. The big issues is either that the handles are taller than the drawers (say 40mm high), or that they protrude back into the drawer and eat up space that way
    stainless.jpg
    Other options I've found are a variant of that, and a brass ring version
    simple.jpgbrass.jpg
    For ultra flush, there is either a rotating version or a pull out

    rotating.jpg Flush.jpg
    As before, if anyone has seen a different style of handle that does not require major recessing and is a low profile, I'd be interested to see a pic. Bonus points for something that is either cheap or I can make myself.

    Michael

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Murray Bridge S Aust.
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    Default

    Hi Michael, I've a couple of handles here that you can have. They're about 125-150 wide and about 80 high and 12-15mm deep from memory, I think the handles are spring loaded, I'll have to check tomorrow to be certain. They need painting as they're in some sort of primer.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    QLD
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    653

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael G View Post
    ...then there is the 3 row box. I'm not too keen on this style as once the pivots start to wear they get a bit floppy. When carrying, the weight of the box is supported through these cantilever links, although there is another style with a bucket type handle.
    cantilever.jpg
    A better mouse trap...

    There's yer inspiration. A re design to fix the faults..




    .
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    The best way to combat Global Warming Hysteria is via reasoned argument.
    http://joannenova.com.au

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    melbourne, laverton
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    1,720

    Default cool post.

    hi Micheal
    how are you mate?
    i like tool storage and tool boxes.
    I wish i could do some quality sheet metal work.
    https://www.ebay.com.au/i/1834754678...EaAs4zEALw_wcB

    Ive seen and used trolleys like this, some even better. The way i see it is there not really tool boxes. I think large well stocked tool boxes can be a distraction. Because when you need a tool for a job. Its better to find the correct tool selecting it from 20 other tools instead of 100 or 1000 other tools.
    If you have a more basic trolley that's stocked out of your other tool boxes. For each job or day. As well as having the tools you are Likey to need for the job. somewhere for consumables like rags ,lubricants, sand paper ect ect. I would all ways like a drink holder for a stubbie.
    Then wheel the trolley over to where you are working. this way you dont need to keep going back to your big tool box or lug heavy unwanted tools to where you are working.

    i hope that makes sense.

    aaron

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mackay North Qld
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    5,013

    Default

    How about this one, then?

    At first I thought it was American , being the "ultimate" toolbox but it originates from the U.K.

    HOME

    Grahame

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
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    38

    Default

    What about if you Hand formed some handle grab from the front panel.
    Using a former ?

    Cheers Matt

  8. #8
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grahame Collins View Post
    How about this one, then?
    Thanks for that Grahame. A really interesting concept. One of the concerns I have is that something like that will sit on the ground which if I'm working on a bench will be a pain in the back. Need to think about how to get around that (electric lifting mechanism?)

    Quote Originally Posted by Simplicity View Post
    What about if you Hand formed some handle grab from the front panel.
    Yes, could do. I'm trying to find something that takes up minimal space when not used, on the basis that less space for handles is more space for tools. One concept I experimented with some time back was a spring loaded flap that would be held down by a security cover but pop up when that was removed and so be ready for use. That would have been formed/ folded.

    Quote Originally Posted by azzrock View Post
    ... I think large well stocked tool boxes can be a distraction. Because when you need a tool for a job. Its better to find the correct tool selecting it from 20 other tools instead of 100 or 1000 other tools...
    That is one way of looking at it (and a reasonable one too.) While there will be a common tool or several, at the moment I have a couple of boxes with core (but different) tools in them. In addition though, I have other tools that I would like to have a common home for that are currently scattered. My centre punches are in a different location to my pin punches; I have two locations for circlip pliers. I have a 16oz hammer in one drawer and a 32oz in another on the other side of the workshop. The problem is partly historic and partly because I tend to group things around use. The Bling toolbox for example contains small tools for (mainly) trouble shooting and adjusting things like sensors on automatic equipment and process lines. My red tool box is mainly for spanners and sockets. The proposed box (if it goes ahead) will probably collect pliers, wrenches and other more specialised 'disassembly' tools like pin punches. No 1000 piece collections - just small-ish (portable) groupings.

    I have a friend who does electrical/ radio stuff and he was saying he has 8 small bags of tools, so knowing the task to be done, he grabs the bag(s) he needs. There will be a small amount of duplication as there will always be common tools, but he finds it quicker and easier to grab say 2 small bags than select from one really large set.

    Michael

  9. #9
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    Default

    Still working on this; things are evolving so the design has changed a bit from original intent...

    I've been working on latches/ pulls and printed this off today. The bits are simple so could be made on a lathe/ mill easily enough, so thought I'd share in case someone else is looking.
    (looks like I"ve been visited by the sideways fairy - doesn't matter for these photos.
    This is a similar latch to that used on toilet stalls if anyone ever sits and contemplates them, but basically there is a rack and pinion used to drive a bar across. The novel thing about this is the handle bail - it can turn through 180 degrees and will lie flat, either in the 'locked' or 'unlocked' position. This being a prototype made on work's printer, the pivot pins for the bail are actually small lengths of paper clip.
    IMG_0622.JPG IMG_0625.JPG
    The workings are simple. On the back of the knob is a 24t gear around 15mm diameter. In metal I'd probably loctite/ scotch key this in place, with a rack cut into the bar. The two plain strips are just to space the surround out from the drawer front - could possibly even be superfluous but haven't tried that yet. The 3D printer is handy for this sort of thing but adds a little (0.1 to 0.2mm) to dimensions so getting a good fit off the printer is not as easy as in metal.
    IMG_0623.JPG IMG_0624.JPG
    The front bezel is 50mm high by 60 wide but can be assembled so that the bar can go either left or right (and at the top of the latch or the bottom). I can't think of a good reason but it could also be assembled to go up or down too.
    I'm thinking about these in metal, one at each end of a drawer to act as handles for pulling the drawer out, and allowing the drawers to be secured against opening if moving/lifting the box. They are only 10mm high so reasonably low profile too.
    For those interested, box has been fabricated but is not fitted out yet as some finessing is required.
    P1040708.JPG
    I...(ahem) 'miscalculated' the drawer heights, so each one will have 2mm of clearance between it and the one above/ below - a little tight (I intended to have 5).


    Michael

  10. #10
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    Default

    Nice and novel idea for the locking mechanism. Will be interesting to see the production model.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  11. #11
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    Default

    Watching with interest Michael.

    Simon
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  12. #12
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    Default

    Gee Simon - you almost sound like you think this is open and shut.
    That was only one handle option. I came up with a couple more since putting that up.
    Both of these are rather crude and unrefined; the models are just to prove the principle.
    First there is this one. Pushing the bottom flap in pushes the top out, making a hand grip.
    IMG_0628.JPG IMG_0631.JPG IMG_0630.JPG
    The flap movement is done with some linkages. I'm trying to work out how to get a bi-stable spring in there to keep it either open or closed.
    The next one has hinged flaps too, but in this case they open out and a folding link between them makes up a handle. It could also benefit from a bi-stable spring as well as a way to keep the flaps in sync too.

    IMG_0633.JPG IMG_0636.JPG IMG_0634.JPG

    Michael

  13. #13
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    Default

    Certainly not Michael, just that your level of project work is so much more sophisticated than mine that I often find it difficult to contribute! I do try to help out where I can.

    One thing I will say, I'm fighting a relentless battle to try and not purchase a 3D printer! They are an invaluable product when it comes to trying new ideas without waisting hours in front of a milling machine!

    I guess if you wanted to go next level you could run a touch panel with raspberry Pi fingerprint recognition and small servo motors to open the draws. Stuff the bistable spring and latch! There, that's all I got for now....

    Simon
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  14. #14
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    On 3D printers I'll say this - the printer is the easy/ cheap part. The software that I'm using to model things is around $10k per seat. While there are some things that it can not do, it's pretty powerful. while I have occasionally entertained fantasies about having a printer here at home, realistically it would be a waste of money without capable software to drive it.

    I did have a thought that if I had 6 different ideas, I could have one per drawer.

    Michael

  15. #15
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    Default

    Bloody hell, 10K for the software. It must be a very capable setup compared to the hummble 3D printer you see in Jaycar and the like.

    I rekon when it comes to latches, you want simple, ergonomic, robust and reliable. Something that's a pleasure to open and close and stay that way for a long time. Something that, when you reach for a tool, you are distracted from the job at hand by the wonderful job you did on the actual storage of the tool.

    Achieving this is not easy. Something that sits nice and flush but with a recessed grippy bit that when you pull it out or down, it not only acts to release a locking latch but presents a handle to pull the draw out. The draws are naturally on some silky smooth bearing runner or similar.

    Simon
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

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