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  1. #31
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
    Age
    67
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    4,030

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    Quote Originally Posted by BaronJ View Post
    Hi John, I don't know at the moment how good or bad mine will be for cutting. Finding the damage that I did, particularly the hinge bracket being broken and the bodge job that someone did to try and fix it, I do worry that the arm will be square to the bed. I've bought several new parts to rectify the relatively few problems that I've found. Thanks:
    If the machine isn't cutting square vertically, the guide blocks where the bearings are may need a bit of attention with a file, as they are rough cast. It's the slot where the bearing carrier mates with Fig 54/55 page 35, in the link provided:
    https://cdn0.grizzly.com/manuals/g0622_m.pdf
    4" x 6" METAL CUTTING BANDSAW OWNER'S MANUAL It shows the Grizzly but it's pretty well universal.
    They recommend that you use a machinists square to check for blade squareness, I found it better to cut a piece of flat about 100mm (4") vertically, then check it with a square, mark the top of the bar so you know which way round it went, you can waste a bit of time otherwise. DAMHIKT
    Change the soft bolts to socket heads while you're messing around with those parts too.
    Hope this helps.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Drouin Vic
    Posts
    136

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    Quote Originally Posted by KBs PensNmore View Post
    They recommend that you use a machinists square to check for blade squareness, I found it better to cut a piece of flat about 100mm (4") vertically, then check it with a square,
    Kryn

    A tip I picked up when I was setting my bandsaw up (it's an Australian built copy of a wells #8, possibly by Macson but the badges is gone) was to use a sacrificial piece of timber for your test cuts rather than steel, each test cut is heaps quicker and of course cheaper.

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    2,530

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    Hi Shed,
    Thankyou for taking the time to post your notes and pictures for me.

    Those pictures of your bandsaw, I found them very informative ! I particularly like the blade wiper and wire wheel to clean the blade. How effective do you find the wire wheel ?

    Using an old car shock absorber is a clever Idea, I wouldn't have thought of using one. Were there any problems cutting it, any gotchas to watch out for. A visit to the scrap yard should see me with one or maybe two of those.

    I picked up a piece of 3 mm plate yesterday to make a new motor mounting plate. The existing one is bent and cracked in various places. Its obvious that its had a hammer taken to it a time or two as well. The "Brooks" motor is also much bigger physically than the motor on the 6X4 one that I looked at in MM and at 1Hp against the 350 watt motor, twice as powerful.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Healesville
    Posts
    1,245

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    Hi John, I think that bobL used the coolant to squirt the cuttings off, so a coolant nozzle either side of the material being cut and a tray under the saw to capture the coolant, I think that would work well.
    My method does work but probably not as good as bob's, if you are not going to use coolant and you use oil then the wire brush will help with flicking the cuttings off the blade.

    I did up my bandsaw 10 yrs ago or there abouts so i guess that i would have just pushed the rod in and ran the a cutoff blade around the tube about an inch down from the top, I say down from the top as you need to cut it when pointing up so that the oil doesn't go all over your boot.

    I made a 2 x O-ring piston and made the rod out of some 12mm stainless rod, the oil level is at a height that always keeps the top side of the piston wet.

    You could likely buy a cylinder for this pretty cheap, I didn't have that option back when I made that cylinder.

    cheers, shed

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Adelaide
    Posts
    172

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    This method for setting the vertical squareness of the blade might work for you - it works well for me, a small neodymium magnet is used to clamp a 6 inch rule to the blade taking care to keep the bottom end of the rule just clear of the teeth, a small square can then be used check to vertical alignment. Obviously the final result will depend a lot on the alignment of the blade system pivots.

    20190814_195845.jpg20190814_195853.jpg20190814_195900.jpg

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    2,530

    Thumbs up Motor Plate.

    Hi Guys,

    First of all, thanks to FamilyGuy for the pictures of his method of setting the bandsaw blade so that it cuts square. A clever idea effectively extending the width of the blade to improve the accuracy of setting it truly vertical.

    Now I have acquired a suitable piece of 3 mm steel plate that I am going to use for the motor mounting plate, replacing that bent bit of tin that was never intended to handle the weight or size of the "Brooks" motor that had been fitted as a replacement for the original one.

    14-08-2019-011.jpg
    This is the "Brooks 1Hp" motor. I've removed the pulley and the fan and its housing ready for painting. It will be the same green that you can see on the base to the the right.

    There is no centrifugal switch on this early motor, being a capacitor start and run type, although a physically identical later motor has a centrifugal switch and only one capacitor, and the even later motor doesn't have a capacitor at all, just a centrifugal switch. A perfect example of cost cutting

    14-08-2019-009.jpg 14-08-2019-008.jpg 14-08-2019-010.jpg
    These pictures show the original bandsaw motor mounting plate laid on top of the piece of 3 mm flat plate. I've marked it out, drilled and tapped the five holes M8. Note that I've not made any provision for motor position adjustment since the motor mounting foot has slots in it so that it can be moved sideways for belt tensioning if necessary.

    I propose to make two brackets with a steel pin between them to form the hinge for the mounting and any spacers that may be needed to adjust its position. I think that the threaded holes in the original plate are a poor idea, both the bolts acting as hinge pins have damaged threads as do the threads in the mounting plate.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  7. #37
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    5,068

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pete O View Post
    A tip I picked up when I was setting my bandsaw up (it's an Australian built copy of a wells #8, possibly by Macson but the badges is gone) was to use a sacrificial piece of timber for your test cuts rather than steel, each test cut is heaps quicker and of course cheaper.
    It's been mentioned before but just in case there are any newbies around, including a piece of timber in the cutting of thin stock is one way of getting around the recommended "3 teeth in the material" at any time.

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    2,530

    Thumbs up Blade Guides.

    Hi Guys,

    I've been stripping and cleaning the two blade guides on the bandsaw today.

    So far I've found that all the 6000ZZ bearings are naff. Two of them were seized and had been spinning on the shaft. One had been damaged by the blade, and all the others were hard to turn for some reason or other. So a set of new bearings has been ordered in order to replace them all.

    It was suggested that I replace the bolts in the guide holder with decent cap screws, so I need to source some 5/16" X 18 ones. The washers behind the existing hex head bolts are badly distorted. However I've cleaned up the cast iron pieces and filed off the rough bits so that they now fit together without rocking on high spots. I'm considering filing the front faces smooth as well so that new thicker washers will sit flat when the fastening bolt is tightened up. That should make adjusting them a little easier.

    16-08-2019-002.jpg 16-08-2019-003.jpg 16-08-2019-004.jpg 16-08-2019-001.JPG
    You can see the polish where the bearing has been spinning on the pin in the first picture. Also the damage to the bearing in the middle in the second picture. The pin that supports the bearing that runs on the back of the blade is secured by those splines on the shaft. The bearings are a press fit on those pins and are prevented from coming off by circlips should they seize and loosen.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mackay North Qld
    Posts
    4,870

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    Quote Originally Posted by KBs PensNmore View Post
    Change the soft bolts to socket heads while you're messing around with those parts too.
    Hope this helps.
    Kryn
    Good one Kryn!

    Its a very good start say for around the those fiddly areas as the socket head removes a lot of that fiddle factor. The job of setting the bearing head/block and the cam is made much easier.

    An even better mod is fitting knobs to those places that are adjusted/moved on a regular basis.
    The bearing slide arms slide lock lock bolts, the moving vice jaw lock down bolt and the adjustable angle quadrant arc slide are good places to fit 50mm+ diameter knobs. The quadrant arc slide knob of course, needs and extension as it will foul on the vice jaw.

    The existing junk plastic knobs on both the blade and belt covers were replaced with metal jobbies spun up on the lathe

    Also the same knob was used on the tension bolt under which I fitted a thrust bearing. That face is tapered on the BS-4As and similar models. To get the flat face perpendicular the tension bolt axis take a piloted holesaw and drill slightly in on the high side. Some of the metal on the high side inside the ring made by the holesaw was removed.

    A flat burr in an air die grinder was used to hog out the unwanted metal and gain that required perpendicular surface to make effective use of the thrust bearing.
    For those with arthritic hands this addition makes a big difference in achieving a decent blade tension.

    The goal was to minimise the requirement to have tools for making the simple adjustments. When using the saw a lot, not having to hunt around for tools to adjust it makes a real pleasure to use.

  10. #40
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
    Age
    67
    Posts
    4,030

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    While you have the guide blocks apart, make/modify a spanner to suit the cams, as it's a right royal pain in the proverbial to adjust them.
    Another thing I did on mine was to fit a bearing to the vise shaft. I welded a piece of pipe to a bit of 12mm flat, which was then machined to suit a 12mm? bearing, the 12mm flat section was then machined on an angle and then bolted in place. This stops the handle moving around from slop in the hole and also removes the crappy little washer.
    Can take pics tomorrow, if anyone requests them??
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  11. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    2,530

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    Hi Kryn, Guys,

    There is almost no play on the vise handle bearing on mine, in fact it seems a bit tight. There seems to be a sweet spot between it binding and how tight you make the moving jaw. If I loosen the moving jaw nut the handle becomes very stiff to turn, if I go the other way it gets tight because the vise plate binds on the base.

    I did think that it might have been paint that had got into the hole but a 1/2" inch drill is a very good fit. I might just ream it out a few thou. Its just occurred to me, of course, the hole might not be quite true to the shaft. Though I'm not quite sure how I would check that

    Thanks for the advice Guys, its much appreciated.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  12. #42
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
    Age
    67
    Posts
    4,030

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    Before you put it back together, unscrew the shaft and try it in the hole. That should give you an indication of where the shaft sits best. Also check to see if it's bent, just in case as you don't know what else happened to it.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  13. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    2,530

    Thumbs up Blade tensioner.

    Hi Guys,

    I've been putting the top wheel and blade tensioner back together today and have discovered that the wheel rubs on the casting. At some point in its life someone had added some washers to shim the wheel support block up. I did put the washers back in and I also tried the block without them. I discovered that there was a whole millimetre of play in the grooves on the sides of the support block.

    17-08-2019_005.JPG 17-08-2019_004.JPG
    This is the wheel support block with one of the original plates that it is held by and runs on. That plate is 4 mm thick and needs to be 5 mm thick to fill the groove.

    17-08-2019_001.JPG
    So I decided to make a pair of new ones. I only had a suitable length of 6 mm bar, so I fly cut 0.5 mm from one face and the turned it over and fly cut 0.5 mm from the other side. I then cut the plate in half with an angle grinder and 1 mm thick abrasive disc.

    17-08-2019_002.JPG 17-08-2019_007.JPG 17-08-2019_003.jpg
    This left me with two pieces that needed machining to reduce the width and get rid of that step on the edge.
    If you look at the third picture you can see the difference in thickness between the new plate and the original one.

    17-08-2019_006.JPG
    This is a test fitting to check that the new plate sits in the groove without being too tight and binding.

    17-08-2019_008.JPG
    This last picture shows me milling 6 mm off the edge of one plate, ready for putting both in the mill vise and machining to finished size.

    There is an awful lot of slop in the original assembly, it is no wonder that it is difficult to get these bandsaws to cut straight. When I put a blade on and tightened it up it wandered around like a drunk. I used an electric drill to drive the worm and gearbox while testing it. The wheel also has around 10 thou eccentricity. I don't know it that is a problem or not, the other wheel on the gearbox shaft only has about a thou and that could just be noise on the gauge probe.

    Thanks Guys.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  14. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Age
    51
    Posts
    508

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    My bandsaw has a third bolt for adjusting the tilt on the wheel.
    Using Tapatalk

  15. #45
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
    Age
    67
    Posts
    4,030

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    By the time you have this machine running, it'll be a piece of precision machinery, not a thrown together POC. (Piece Of Crap).
    I like the way that you've gone about it all, very methodical. Wonder how many of us will go through our machines now to rectify existing problems.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

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