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Thread: Chop Saw Stand?

  1. #1
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    Default Chop Saw Stand?

    Hello all.


    I am a 2nd year University student studying Industrial design.
    For one of my projects I am looking at developing a Stand for Chop Saws.
    As I have seen that there is a lot of Chop Saws and Abrasive Chop Saw, however I can not see any stands like there is for Mitre Saws.
    So I wanted to see if it is a product people might be interest in using.


    Any feedback would be great for my project.






    Thank you

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by aaronsmith8265 View Post
    Hello all.
    I am a 2nd year University student studying Industrial design.
    For one of my projects I am looking at developing a Stand for Chop Saws.
    As I have seen that there is a lot of Chop Saws and Abrasive Chop Saw, however I can not see any stands like there is for Mitre Saws.
    So I wanted to see if it is a product people might be interest in using.
    Any feedback would be great for my project. Thank you
    Hi, they utilise the same stand for the chop saw/abrasive saw as the mitre saw.
    HTH
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  3. #3
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    One of the things to consider is the weight of the material being cut. I know a lot of people who work in timber will have a mitre saw on a stand and will happily lift timber up to a feed-in bench to cut it off.

    Lifting a length of steel section up to a saw is a different matter, as the lengths are typically longer (6 to 8m) and heavier. I see contractors leaving their chop saws on the ground, as they can just drag sections across to cut them. No lifting. Permanent installations (as you would find in some factories) will typically have a solid stand and roller assemblies bolted to a wall, and lift material up with a forklift, crane or several people. I guess a corollary to that is that any chop saw stand (and feed-in/ feed-out stands) will need to be solidly build and quite stable, as the act of positioning the steel (lifting as well as shoving around) could make something that would be sturdy enough for a length of timber topple over.

    If your University has a workshop, perhaps head down and try lifting and moving/ turning around a long length of steel and you will see what I mean. Not saying that a stand many not be a good idea, but I think that positioning of the material to cut is the main reason that you don't see too many portable stands around. Not to say it's not an idea worth exploring - I had a Black and Decker workmate at one time for a portable work bench which was really handy, but it could have been a bit higher and bigger. The splayed legs gave it better stability than a straight up and down table would have had.

    Michael

  4. #4
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    Michael is on the money, the fixed chop saw in my workshop sits in a frame set up with a 8' long in-feed bed and a 4' long out bed so that I can load steel into the saw knowing that it will be perpendicular to the blade and well supported. There is a moveable stand that is used to support the end of very long material. The frame places the saw at a comfortable height for operation, the underside of the frame is set up as a storage rack as a side benefit.

    The portable saws are used on the workshop or job site floor and I've made a couple of rollers to support the steel at the same height as the saw bedplate. The rollers are moved wherever necessary to support the incoming and severed material.

  5. #5
    BobL is offline Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Many workshops (especially smaller home workshop) don't have room for long infeed or outfeed tables so they typically have a few sets of rollers that they employ. Once the job is done the rollers are then put aside to recover the space.

    I don't use a chop saw but if I need to break up long lengths of metal I wheel my bandsaw to the space near my shed door so that the metal can poke out the door. Then I use low rollers on either side of the saw to maintain a suitable height. My metal storage rack isa only 3m long so longer lengths get cut up to a max of 3m.

    At the ship building yard where my BIL works they just have their chop saws on top of long benches. They also make use of standard wood working saw stands and roller stands with wide bases.

  6. #6
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    My pet hate is having to use a cut off saw(Metal or Timber) on the floor. I have made a very simple "table" out of angle and pipe for the legs. The drop saw just drops in to position and held steady with screws that go into where the rubber pads on the bottom of the saw went. Off to the right is a short bench 600mm and off to the left the simple bench is 2400mm. I have a fitting that screws to the out feed table that holds a clamp for repeat measurement cuts. Any thing longer (full lengths) I bring through the PA door and bring it to the say using a couple of saw stools/stands. I do a bit with long lengths of RHS at times and this set up cuts up a length very quickly
    Just do it!

    Kind regards Rod

  7. #7
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    Default dust control thoughts...

    While you are down at a workshop checking out one of these saws, take note how much filth they create. In the back of my mind I've been thinking of a spark proof curtain that would direct waste down to a catch bin at the back. Usually they shoot into a wall, building a stalagmite of grinding dust over time. A portable stand and waste containment might have marketing value for building site work.
    regs.
    AndrewOC
    'Waratah' spring hammer by Hands & Scott c.1911- 20, 'Duffy, Todd & Williams' spring hammer c.1920, Premo lathe- 1953, Premo filing machine.

  8. #8
    BobL is offline Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewOC View Post
    While you are down at a workshop checking out one of these saws, take note how much filth they create. In the back of my mind I've been thinking of a spark proof curtain that would direct waste down to a catch bin at the back. Usually they shoot into a wall, building a stalagmite of grinding dust over time. A portable stand and waste containment might have marketing value for building site work.
    regs.
    AndrewOC
    Good idea to think about constrain of waste scatter.

    My thin kerf abrasive saw is mounted like a table saw and ~95% of the metal dust waste is collected by a removable baked bean can, mounted directly under the cutting table. See red arrow in picture below
    The can gets very hot on long cuts and heavy from the all metal dust it collects however, this does little to contain the "grey goo" that eventually spreads all over the shed from using even this little saw.

    My investigation of waste from an abrasive cutting saw suggests it consists of 3 classes of materials.

    The first is the metal dust from the material being cut and this is mostly what is seen. Most shoots out in a specific direction and is why it can mostly be collected.
    If any is not collected, it falls out of the air quickly (~8 times faster than wood dust) and does not travel very far, although your foot wear will eventually track it every where you walk.

    The second is the abrasive grit itself, plus abrasive bonding agents like fibreglass and resins. These produce finer dusts and are the primary source of the "grey goo" seen all over metal work sheds that use abrasive wheels. These materials form more fine dust, stay in the air longer and are distributed further than the metal dust. As a result operators will end up breathing more of this than the metal dust. It's also tracked everywhere and further by footwear.

    The last thing are gasses made by the cutting process which are mainly a result of burnt/heated wheel bonding agents. Amongst other things there are CO and CO2 produced. Not a problem in a large workspace but could be in a constrained space. These gasses stay in the air until either vented or eventually coalescing on surfaces further contributing to the grey goo.

    Most of the metal dust and some of the coarser abrasive grit dust can be contained (eg baked bean can) but the rest behaves much more like a gas which is why about the only way to constrain it is by airflow.
    This is why I user an extraction snorkel with about 350 CFM of air flow when using this saw. I also use it for general grinding and finishing.
    The snorkel is attached to a 20L metal bin that catches lumps of hot material if they get loose and the bin is attached to a conventional wood dust extractor,
    Provided I remember to sue it, it definitely reduces the amount of grey goo in the shed.

    catchcan.jpg

    I should add I mainly use a horizontal bandsaw to cut metal stock.

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