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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
    Age
    70
    Posts
    5,266

    Default X2 electrical experience??

    Anyone in Adelaide have any experience with the X2 mini mill electrics, and would be prepared to look at it for me PLEASE? Had the circuit board checked, that's OK. The amber fault light is on, when the potent meter is in the run position, but no go in the motor, have replaced the fuse also. Anyone come across this problem?
    Thanks in advance.
    Kryn

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Upwey VIC
    Posts
    185

    Default

    Kryn,

    The amber fault light on mine comes on when the motor is overloaded (drawing high current over it's rating).
    Possibly your motor has a short circuit internally, or even has a seized bearing?

    Andrew.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    home
    Posts
    621

    Default



    The amber light is controlled by the over-current circuitry - although I can't find an indicator lamp on the circuit diagram.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Melbourne
    Age
    67
    Posts
    1,410

    Default

    If the speed control is tested fine, and the overload light comes on, chances are the motor has a problem. Sieg makes their own brushed DC permanent magnet (PM) motors. From my experience with my X3, not the best quality I am afraid. About what you would expect in an Asian kitchen blender or treadmill. Some newer Sieg mills do however have brushless DC motors, if this is your case disregard the following.

    It is not difficult to test a brushed PM motor. Take the motor off the mill head. Scrape or punch a line across the brush carrier flange to mark its position relative to the outer frame - should the motor turn out to be ok, you need this to reassemble witout having to worry about proper timing. Remove the brushes if removable (two plastic screw caps). Take out the long screws that clamp both flanges together. Carefully remove the flange with the brush carrier. Inspect visually, if the brushes or brush carriers are damages or extremely dirty, you may already have forund the problem. Else carfully remove the rotor/armature. Try not to have it slide along the magnets (you may insert a cardboard or Brass/Aluminium/plasic strip to prevent this). It may otherwise partially de-magnetize the magnets. Now you can test the armature with an Ohm-meter. Chances are there is a short beteen two windings, or a winding is shorted to ground. These two links explain in detail how to do the testing:
    http://www.groschopp.com/how-to-check-a-motor-armature/
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qNV7TylIzSY




  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
    Age
    70
    Posts
    5,266

    Default

    Hi CBA.
    Thanks for the instructions on dismantling the motor and the links, very interesting, will check the motor out tomorrow.
    Thanks
    Kryn

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    York, North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    5,586

    Default

    Hi Kryn,

    Don't make any attempt to remove the armature the magnets will start to loose their strength if you do. Most likely is a brush failure ! or windings have a short in them. Putting the motor across a 12 volt source like a car battery should cause the motor to try to turn. If it turns and tries to lock in one spot then you have a short in the commutator or windings. A brush failure can be easily seen when the brush is removed, the pigtail will be loose in the carbon and you might see signs of local overheating. If you are lucky new brushes should clear the problem.

    HTH.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

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