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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    adelaide
    Posts
    293

    Default Matching stand - at last

    I finally got around to making a stand for the lathe - got sick of the wobbly stand that came with the lathe. Might recycle them into the garden shed???
    The new stand matches the the power tool cupboard I made a while back. I was going to copy rodweb's idea for a separate coolant shelf but ran out of steel and motivation. The stand is made from some 50mm heavy wall tubing I had lying around, some new RHS, some 50mm x 8mm flat and some 65mm x 8mm angle I also bought.
    Made in two sections, the bottom section of which is loxined to the floor. It has a drawer at top and two shelves under, the top of which holds chucks, faceplate, change gears, steadies, coolant bucket and pump while the bottom shelf just holds steel stock.
    The top section is of 65mm angle and has a small shelf at front under the chip tray for odds and sods. It's affixed to the the lower section by way of four 12mm x 1.25 bolts welded to the underneath. Levelling is by way of these four bolts. I tried the adjustment out before settling on this system, very happy with the results - 5 minutes tops to level, much quicker than fiddling around with shims.
    I've also sent off for a new coolant pump to replace the pond pump, this one can be used dry or as a submersible. I'll be using it dry so it shouldn't be as messy when changing coolant.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Location
    Southern Highlands NSW
    Posts
    1,910

    Default

    That's an interesting way to organise levelling.
    Neat idea!

    Jordan

  3. #3
    BobL is offline Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    7,213

    Default

    I like the last photo - it looks classy enough to be part of the outdoor furniture!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    149

    Default

    That looks fantastic. I really like the levelling system you have there.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    4,779

    Default

    Hi there,

    Nice neat work. I like the combination of steel and timber work. WRT the levelling system, so you level the lathe feet individually and then after that is done, you can then tilt the whole system one way or another (with the outer nut/bolt) to suit your coolant drainage needs. Is that correct?

    I like it!

    Simon
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    moonbi nsw Aus
    Age
    69
    Posts
    364

    Default

    Th62, great job!!! The leveling system is novel. I have only ever done any adjusting from grovelling on the floor. You have certaily gotten over that hurdle. I also like the hinges you have made for the doors. You have moved the pivot away so the door is right out of the way. Very inventive!! I like it
    Just do it!

    Kind regards Rod

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    adelaide
    Posts
    293

    Default Levelling

    Not sure what you mean by 'lathe feet' SimonL. There is no adjustment on the lathe feet; instead, the feet are actually bolted to the angle iron top frame and then the 12mm x 1.25 bolts welded to the underneath of that frame are located in the plates atop the bottom frame and used to remove any twist (once the bottom frame is secured to the floor f course). The bolts in the lathe feet are only around 190mm wide whereas the bolts welded to the underside of the angle are twice that distance so it gives a finer adjustment. Level of course is the wrong word, perhaps I should say level in respect to itself??? The coolant drain is located near the centre of the tray so angling of the tray isn't required - a slight bump with a hammer on a piece of wood in the vicinity of the drain sees to run off. I, of course, know exactly what I mean, hopefully you do too. Not wholly my idea unfortunately, it's a combination of different systems:

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