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  1. #31
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    Charlestown NSW
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    65
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    Quote Originally Posted by nearnexus View Post
    Good video.

    I didn't actually notice the log splitter.

    Rob
    what log splitter? hahahahh

    bollie7

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Athelstone, SA 5076
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    4,264

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    Quote Originally Posted by nearnexus View Post
    Good video.

    I didn't actually notice the log splitter.

    Rob

    a couple lumpy bits caught my attention

  3. #33
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
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    155

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    I think those cone screw splitters are quite safe if they are made correctly. The car wheel types seem to be made with the intention of pulling peoples arms off.

    The cone screw needs to be quite close to the base to prevent the wood turning.

    Are these cone screws available in Australia or is it something else OH&S has outlawed. I've seen a few European and US sites selling them.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Lebrina
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    Quote Originally Posted by beefy View Post
    I think those cone screw splitters are quite safe if they are made correctly. The car wheel types seem to be made with the intention of pulling peoples arms off.

    The cone screw needs to be quite close to the base to prevent the wood turning.

    Are these cone screws available in Australia or is it something else OH&S has outlawed. I've seen a few European and US sites selling them.
    I should damn well hope they are outlawed!
    It beggars belief that anyone would use one. Even the most basic of risk assessments would preclude their use. There is no way to release yourself from one if you become caught, there is a danger of the block catching and spinning. Just try to split wood with several digits or an arm missing.
    IMHO, there is but one acceptable power source for a wood splitter - hydraulics. The crank and conrod type are non reversible until they complete a stroke, this is okay until your hand or fingers get in the way, the cone screw are something best left in the dark ages whereas hydraulic is reversible at any point if set up correctly, easily incorporates a dead man release and has the advantage of being non mechanical, meaning that stalling out will not cause breakage etc.
    Having said that, the most cost effective splitter I know of is a Fiskars X25 or X27. If they won't do it then rip, (noodle), it with your chainsaw.
    I do own a wood splitter, it is combined with a 48" saw bench and is of the Super axe design, powered by a 55HP diesel engine, when completed it will also incorporate a conveyor belt to load the cut and split wood onto a ute or truck.

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Wimmera
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    51
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    369

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    Hi karl

    I recon you would love this one then



    cheers
    Harty

  6. #36
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    Jul 2006
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    Athelstone, SA 5076
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    Quote Originally Posted by harty69 View Post
    Hi karl

    I recon you would love this one then

    cheers
    Harty
    apart from the bobcat cutter splitter they all look dangerous...that last one was moving way too fast for my liking...i cherish my little pinkies...else I wouldnt have a nose

  7. #37
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    Jun 2012
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    SA
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    Quote Originally Posted by eskimo View Post
    apart from the bobcat cutter splitter they all look dangerous...that last one was moving way too fast for my liking...i cherish my little pinkies...else I wouldnt have a nose
    Yes, totally agree. That's why I have a gas heater

    This study of injuries makes interesting reading.

    Over 80% of injuries were from wedge type splitters.

    http://www.ciop.pl/43475

    Rob

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Healesville
    Posts
    2,135

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    Quote Originally Posted by Karl Robbers View Post
    I do own a wood splitter, it is combined with a 48" saw bench and is of the Super axe design, powered by a 55HP diesel engine, when completed it will also incorporate a conveyor belt to load the cut and split wood onto a ute or truck.
    Your baiting Karl

    I would like to see your machine, it sounds like a p*sser

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Heidelberg, Victoria
    Age
    80
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    2,074

    Default Polishing axe head

    I have a wood splitter, and an axe, the wood splitter has trouble splitting red gum logs with the wavy grain, the axe is better.

    Question, how do I polish the sides of the axe, to a mirror finish?

    I reckon the smoother the axe sides, the better.

    Ken

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Far West Wimmera
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    64
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    4,049

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    Quote Originally Posted by neksmerj View Post
    I have a wood splitter, and an axe, the wood splitter has trouble splitting red gum logs with the wavy grain, the axe is better.

    Question, how do I polish the sides of the axe, to a mirror finish?

    I reckon the smoother the axe sides, the better.

    Ken
    I would say that if your splitter has trouble splitting wavy grained red gum then it cannot be very powerful. In my experience a hand splitter (Canadian style) is far better than an axe splitting wood.

    To find out about polishing your axe look at wood cutting competition information. Those guys can use their axe to shave, both as a blade and a mirror. For wood splitting I have always thought that smoothing with sandpaper/emery to say 600 grit would be adequate. I always intended to do this with my hand splitter but I have not used it in years, mainly due to a medical condition that reduces my lung capacity, which makes splitting by hand rather slow and tiring. Therefore I built a hydraulic one.

    My homemade hydraulic splitter has problems splitting red gum forks. I have to find the right position. Wavy or prickly forms of red gum just get split along with the rest. We pick up forks that most people leave behind.

    I am not trying to brag, just saying that some are better than others. I am pretty sure that mine cost more than yours but then we have a kitchen range, and slow combustion in the lounge and we rely on these for all heating, hot water and most cooking.

    Dean

  11. #41
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    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ballarat
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    65
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    Quote Originally Posted by neksmerj View Post
    I have a wood splitter, and an axe, the wood splitter has trouble splitting red gum logs with the wavy grain, the axe is better.

    Question, how do I polish the sides of the axe, to a mirror finish?

    I reckon the smoother the axe sides, the better.

    Ken
    Hi Ken,
    One of my apprentices a while back was the junior Victorian woodchop champion. He would sit there for hours after tea with an Arkansas stone and just keep rubbing the sides. He was always searching ebay for very old stones, apparently the older ones are better

    Phil

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