Thanks Thanks:  0
Likes Likes:  0
Needs Pictures Needs Pictures:  0
Picture(s) thanks Picture(s) thanks:  0
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 26
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    4

    Default What tools do I need to work in metal?

    I know that is a pretty broad question, so to be more specific. I am primarily a woodie at heart, love the stuff, but there are many times when 'it would be good to make that out of metal' thoughts arise. Hence I have been doing some research as to welders and it seems to me that the Lincoln 180C will be the right choice for the relatively light to medium stuff I want to make. Typically working with RHS up to 50mm and steel plate and angle max 6mm thick. Maybe some Aluminium down the track.
    Now a welder is great but that ain't going to do the cutting and grinding.
    Given that I have the makings of a good wood shop what extras do I need to cut and grind metal?

  2. #2
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    5,434

    Default

    I would recommend
    - a metal cutting bandsaw, they're not expensive, quiet, no sparks, can leave it alone to cut while you do something else and it cuts straighter than a hand held grinder.
    - not skimping on PPE and a decent welding helmet
    - decent engineering vice
    - a fire extinguisher.
    - angle grinders are horrible loud things but even so I use up to 4 when metal working. EG Flap sander, wire wheel, cutting disc, grinding wheel.

  3. #3
    Dave J Guest

    Default

    Hi and welcome to the forum

    The welder sounds good
    I would say a cheap bandsaw for around $300-$400 for cutting stock
    4 inch grinder
    5 inch grinder
    Grinding disc's (1mm thick are great for the 4 inch)
    Flap disc's for the 5 inch for finishing
    A plasma cutter is great for sheet metal cut outs and can be had for around $500 up
    Ball peen hammers
    Good vice
    Files
    G Clamps
    A welding bench
    Auto darkening helmet, (a good idea for someone new to welding.)

    I am sure there are other things I have forgot, but other members will catch up on them.
    With welding aluminium you will need a Teflon liner for the MIG, if your buying it new see if they will throw one in for you. You will also need a different gas for it.

    Dave

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    texas, queensland
    Posts
    248

    Default

    4 inch angle grinder hands down most usefull tool in the shed i have at least 2 all the time i have worn out at least a dozen of em over the years .also have a 7inch dont use it a lot though . i cut my stock with a hitachi cut off saw cos thats what i have messy but quick .
    'If the enemy is in range, so are you.'

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
    Posts
    3,324

    Default safety

    hearing protection - plugs as you will end up with tinutus without them ..

    safety glasses

    ditto what the others said . Mike

  6. #6
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    5,434

    Default

    Metal work PPE

    Welding Gloves
    Full face shield for HD work
    Safety Glasses for light work
    Welding Helmet
    Ear muffs (they are better than plugs)
    Regular leather gloves for handling metal
    Steel capped boots
    Overalls
    Leather apron.
    Bucket full of cold water - for when you burn yourself.
    Safety first kit

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Roxby Downs Sth Aust
    Age
    42
    Posts
    205

    Default

    just think of what you use for wood work and get the metal work equivelant,
    hacksaw
    set square
    adjustable square
    french/engineers chalk
    vice grips
    multi grips
    pliers
    files
    and all the rest, you will work it out.

    i wouldn't go for a 4" angle grider, toys. get a good 5".
    a couple of good ball peen hammers, good engineers vice, g clamps, f clamps, whatever you prefer.

    good luck.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Queensland
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by texx View Post
    4 inch angle grinder hands down most usefull tool in the shed i have at least 2 all the time i have worn out at least a dozen of em over the years .also have a 7inch dont use it a lot though . i cut my stock with a hitachi cut off saw cos thats what i have messy but quick .
    Bugger the little 4" grinder, get a good 5"!!!!! Makita makes a great one for around $100 bucks, its handle is nice and small, easy to grip and its bloody quiet with out to much vibration. The 5" wheels remove more material, have more power and you get more out each disc saving money A cheep 4" grinder cost what $40 and last only 6 months save yourself the desperate dash to the tool store when the 4" screws up.

    Now Im not like these other guys that are going to get you to spend loads of cash no no no all you need to start with is your trusty 5", a few cut off wheels, a few grinding discs and the cream of the crop some flapper discs and you are set Some appropriate clothes are a given, safety glasses and a comfortable welding helmet
    happy turning

    Patrick

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    4

    Default I would belost without forums like this.......

    Thankyou to all respondees, just love the enthusiasm.
    Keep it coming.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    4

    Default I would be lost without forums like this.......

    Thankyou to all respondees, just love the enthusiasm.
    Keep it coming.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Brisbane
    Posts
    91

    Default

    you've probably got them already, but plenty of clamps (i mainly use g's and f's)

    definately get a horizontal bandsaw or even just an abrasive chopsaw if pinpoint accuracy isn't an issue, doing lots of cutting of 50x50 tubing with a 5" grinder will waste your time.

    i agree with everyone that said get a 5" grinder over a 4" and i'd also watch out for the power rating, a while back i got a cheapish AEG at bunnings with 700W of power, but it's truly gutless next to my 1500W bosch and cutting things is like night and day between the pair of em

    you might consider getting a chipping hammer for slag removal if you ever feel like fluxcore welding, and a wire brush (handheld or one that attaches to your grinder, either or both)

  12. #12
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    5,434

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Corgan View Post
    you've probably got them already, but plenty of clamps (i mainly use g's and f's)
    Yep I agree. I find a range of smaller (2, 3, 4 and 6") G clamps are very useful and often easier to use than just using big clamps for everything.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Bairnsdale
    Age
    46
    Posts
    829

    Default

    Lathe
    Couple of Milling Machines
    Surface Grinder
    Shaper.
    And a boat load of tooling to go with it....
    Warning Disclaimer

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Roxby Downs Sth Aust
    Age
    42
    Posts
    205

    Default

    i got a 5" AEG about 10 years back and it's still going strong, only thing i dislike is the switch under the handle, dead man switch or some crap they call it, go for one that has the switch mounted on the side so you can use it with one hand.

    Quote Originally Posted by Corgan View Post
    you've probably got them already, but plenty of clamps (i mainly use g's and f's)

    definately get a horizontal bandsaw or even just an abrasive chopsaw if pinpoint accuracy isn't an issue, doing lots of cutting of 50x50 tubing with a 5" grinder will waste your time.

    i agree with everyone that said get a 5" grinder over a 4" and i'd also watch out for the power rating, a while back i got a cheapish AEG at bunnings with 700W of power, but it's truly gutless next to my 1500W bosch and cutting things is like night and day between the pair of em

    you might consider getting a chipping hammer for slag removal if you ever feel like fluxcore welding, and a wire brush (handheld or one that attaches to your grinder, either or both)

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Newcastle, NSW
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Pretty broad but it depends a bit on what sort of metal work.
    PPE will be number 1 but if you are already a woody you will already have ear muff (ear plugs are better if inserted properly), safety glasses, facesheild etc.

    If you are looking for a general purpose welder I would start off with a cheaper dc arc welder and learn on that. If you are looking at working with alloys or stainless and thin sheet metal the probably look at either a mig or TIG - many tigs these days come with arc built in and also maybe even plasma which would make it a bit more versitile than the mig (this is why I have just bought a ac/dc tig, plasma, arc welder and am selling my mig)
    Also buy a decent auto darkening helmet (many also double as a face sheild for grinding) - I have just seen the light after welding for a number of years wearing a $30-$50 flip down helmet and absolutly love my new auto darkening helmet.

    Definatly need a grinder - as others have said get a 5 inch - 125mm. I have the makita $100 one which comes in a plastic case and with a bunch of grinding wheels and have used it for a few years without issue - I also love the 1mm cutting disks.
    Flappy sanding disks are also great for polishing, grinding and smoothing.

    A few files and a good vice are also a good investment.
    Good quality drill bits
    For cutting sheet metal I use a jigsaw with a metal blade

    I think that is most of what I have. That would at least get you started and then you can work out what you don't have that you need/want. Also on bigger ticket items like mills, lathes etc I look around at what my mates have got and try not to double up as I can just head round to their place to use theirs and visa versa if only using them every now and again - also saves on floor space in my garage.

    HTH
    James

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Brass Metal Work
    By leeuj in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 9th Aug 2010, 12:15 PM
  2. Free Metal and Wood Work Plans For Tools
    By echnidna in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 3rd May 2009, 01:19 PM
  3. Metal work clubs?
    By petersemple in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30th Apr 2009, 12:43 AM
  4. looking for a metal work course after woodwork
    By euphorbia in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28th May 2007, 06:28 PM
  5. hi to my fellow metal work
    By godfather in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 21st Oct 2005, 09:44 AM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •