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  1. #2386
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Griffith NSW
    Posts
    435

    Default

    Ive never had much of a problem with the tailstock moving while tightening collets. Occasionally it might move a bit, but its never resulted in a slipped spanner yet. Crap under the tailstock happens a lot on hercus's anyway without way wipers fitted to the tailstock. Thats actually something I want to make one day, along with something to retain the tailstock down a little better than the cam / nut arrangement.

    Holding the job with a rag while parting isnt ideal, but youre gunna have to suggest a better way to catch a polished sphere if you want to level that as a criticism. Also, it was paper not fabric, which should be a bit safer (but still not ideal).

    Yes, stopping the chuck with my hand is unsafe. The likelihood of stopping that in my home shop is slim. I have considered fitting a spindle brake to the back of the chuck as a project one day. ill try not to do it in videos, thats a valid point.

    The use of the countersink tool to remove the horrid burr off the back of the part wasnt great either. What I should have done was regrind the parting tool to cut on an angle to help eliminate it. Part of it too is that I was parting into a thread, so the parting tool removed enough material until the thread was weakened enough to break apart. I should have left material untapped on the mandrel section, made a pointy parting tool. Alternatively, I should have made up a 3/8 mandrel and avoid the whole two threadforms altogether. I could have put the ball back on a mandrel and used the lathe to deburr it properly, but I was under a good deal of time pressure to get content out there.

    The compound didnt move when I bumped the shoulder, the toolpost did. The school lathes use lantern style posts. If Id cleaned under it like you suggested, it might have helped a bit. Tightening it properly would have made all the difference, it really was barely done up. Its easy to get distracted from proper setup when youre under time pressure, trying to film with a child at home still and filming for the first time.

  2. #2387
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Vic
    Age
    45
    Posts
    527

    Default

    Finally i got around to get the project going. A slotter for Hercus lathe. I bought the block of brass with dovetail already on it, some sort of grinding attachment. The motor is 12v from car wiper motor. the coupling is 1/4" universal socket driver. I reamed the hole to 5/8".

    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #2388
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Perth WA
    Age
    68
    Posts
    6,306

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jackaroo View Post
    Finally i got around to get the project going. A slotter for Hercus lathe. I bought the block of brass with dovetail already on it, some sort of grinding attachment. The motor is 12v from car wiper motor. the coupling is 1/4" universal socket driver. I reamed the hole to 5/8".
    Very impressive Trong!!

  4. #2389
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,646

    Default Your latest project

    Just a simple little project - a lathe carriage stop for my Takisawa lathe.
    Decided it would be a useful tool and make it easier to bore a bearing recess with a shoulder in a an idler pulley. Plus it was a good exercise on the new mill.
    Designed on the fly and you can see I had a brain fart with slitting the indicator hole for clamping. Meant to slit from the underside as there was more meat for clamping screws. Didn't work and I ended up just using a single screw from the side (should have just done that in the first place).







    Steve

  5. #2390
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    N.W.Tasmania
    Posts
    1,264

    Default

    We have all done jobs, that if we were to do them again, we would change things around a bit. That is the trouble with "one offs". I guess it is different for those who are proficient with CAD programs which allow modelling of object behaviours, you get to see the clamping ability of a setup before cutting metal, and you have the opportunity to make the necessary changes.
    My guess is that if you were to make another, you may move the indicator bushing further up, and slit from underneath, allowing greater leverage of the clamping screw which could be placed low in the block to assist. Thanks for posting and at least you were able to recover the job even if not as elegantly as you had first envisioned it.

  6. #2391
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,646

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ropetangler View Post
    We have all done jobs, that if we were to do them again, we would change things around a bit. That is the trouble with "one offs". I guess it is different for those who are proficient with CAD programs which allow modelling of object behaviours, you get to see the clamping ability of a setup before cutting metal, and you have the opportunity to make the necessary changes.
    My guess is that if you were to make another, you may move the indicator bushing further up, and slit from underneath, allowing greater leverage of the clamping screw which could be placed low in the block to assist. Thanks for posting and at least you were able to recover the job even if not as elegantly as you had first envisioned it.
    Thanks RT.
    I openly acknowledge that I'm much better at making things functional, than making them elegant. My usual line is - I'll make it work, get someone else to make it look good
    If I hadn't slit it (and not even central in the hole at that! ) I'd have been quietly happy that I'd actually made something from scratch with no real stuff up.

    It actually works really nicely. Clamps well, easy to move, and slides off the LH end of the way if I want to remove it.
    Not 100% convinced on the cheap long-travel indicator, but its easy enough to read. I just used it to set the stop position for the boring depth then removed it.
    The SHCS for the main clamp bolt might be prone to filling up with swarf, but I generally have an air hose handy so should be OK. Can always make a nice clamp bolt with spanner flats on it down the track if need be.

    Steve

  7. #2392
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Location
    Finland
    Age
    44
    Posts
    103

    Default

    I found old drawer some time ago.
    Did frame for it. So that i can bolt it to the floor under my workbench.
    Drawer is made from 2mm sheet and has supports under it. It handles easily weight of my chop saws.

    FB_IMG_1588322097219.jpgFB_IMG_1588322106078.jpg

  8. #2393
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    427

    Default

    I am doing the final touches on this little BBQ.
    It's a portable offset smoker. A bit more maneuverable than the 200+ KG smoker in the background.


    IMG_1902.jpg

  9. #2394
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Age
    53
    Posts
    1,164

    Default

    Bother the drawer and smoker look great.
    I need to make some deeper drawers than yours to hold my lathe chucks one day, and get rid of the old filing cabinet.
    To be fair it's held up well for the past 10 or more years.
    Using Tapatalk

  10. #2395
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ipswich QLD
    Age
    65
    Posts
    1,931

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tuomas Soikkeli View Post
    I found old drawer some time ago.
    Did frame for it. So that i can bolt it to the floor under my workbench.
    Drawer is made from 2mm sheet and has supports under it. It handles easily weight of my chop saws.

    FB_IMG_1588322097219.jpgFB_IMG_1588322106078.jpg
    Thanks for the idea stored for future draw

  11. #2396
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ballina N.S.W.
    Posts
    643

    Default Handy accessory for boring head

    Being grounded like all of us I was looking for a useful project to fill in some time. I watched mrpete22 on Youtube showing his version of a Bore-Rite designed accessory to fit onto your boring head to make fine adjustments a lot easier. Lyle Peterson is a keen at home pattern making and casting in Aluminium, not having that option available I had to delve into my offcuts bin and find some steel. I had just finished making four tight tolerance bushes for a mate and could see the advantages of this accessory.I have just tried it out and it works very well.
    Bob
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  12. #2397
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Mallacoota,VIC,Australia
    Age
    50
    Posts
    904

    Default

    That looks great Bob a very handy tool. I'm going to watch Mrpete22's videos on it later on YouTube. Thanks for sharing.
    All The Best steran50 Stewart

    The shortest way to do many things is to do only one thing at once.

  13. #2398
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Age
    53
    Posts
    1,164

    Default

    I'm going to look into making one since I have a load of aluminum here and could do with one to make boring easier.
    Thanks for the heads up as I never watch YouTube videos
    Using Tapatalk

  14. #2399
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    N.W.Tasmania
    Posts
    1,264

    Default

    That job looks really nice Bob, congratulations on such a nice implementation. You ought to send Lyle (Mr.Pete) a link to show him your efforts. I think that he would be really chuffed.

  15. #2400
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Ballina N.S.W.
    Posts
    643

    Default

    Ropetangler,
    Thanks for your reply and I have taken your advice and sent a link to Mr Pete.

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