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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tamworth, NSW
    Posts
    119

    Default Framelock flipper

    I thought Id share my most recent pocket knife build. This is a framelock design with flipper opening. It runs on bearings to help the flipping action. Bothe the frames and handle are titanium and blade is Nitro-V stainless. I milled the pattern in the titanium scale and have it a sandblasted finish. Backspaced is Orange G10. Inside the hardened stop pin runs in a milled slot to give the open and closed position. A ceramic detent ball provides the positive closing and makes sure it doesnt open in your pocket.

    Theae are tricky little buggers. Lots of opportunity to stuff up the folding/locking geometry but satisfying to finish and carry in your pocket for everyday chores.

    Thanks for looking
    Ian
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,336

    Default

    Nice looking knife. ( not Lawful in SA though )

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tamworth, NSW
    Posts
    119

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    Nice looking knife. ( not Lawful in SA though )
    Thanks. I wasn't aware of any restrictions in SA? Possibly automatic knives where there is an assisted opening spring are restricted but flipping actions where finger pressure drives opening are commonly sold in local shops in other states.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,336

    Default

    Basically anything that can be opened with one hand, ( that is what I was told when they confiscated mine)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Location
    NSW
    Posts
    433

    Default

    I've been a collector of folders for quite a while.
    'single handed opening' was a requirement for a while, however testing rules have been somewhat revised, from what I've been made aware of. It's a bit silly as a classification as fixed blade knives do not require any preparation to become dangerous, and even the smallest blade can be deadly if one has intent.
    To top it off, people don't get stabbed by $2K+ custom folders. Scissors, bits of glass, kitchen knives, junkie's needles... all the weapons of choice.


    Assisted opening (spring assisted, or 'out the front') are still definitely a no-no.
    Same as gravity opening. Double sided daggers and knuckle-duster trench knives also no bueno.

    Flippers like this, a bit grey area. Same as 'single handed opening' knives with a loose pivot pin that can be flicked open by a snap of the wrist.

    I've got a few of the Emerson knives, the wave feature is quite a trick way of opening ;-)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    2,788

    Default

    Great looking knife. Milling the titanium must have been challenging. How many hours work in that knife?
    Chris

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tamworth, NSW
    Posts
    119

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jack620 View Post
    How many hours work in that knife?

    Thanks Jack

    More than I'd like to admit is the real answer. I've never sat down and worked it out but I doubt I could finish one in a week working 9-5 just on it. I am sure if I nailed down a process and started to do a couple at a time I could reduce it a bit but I am doing it as a hobby for teh enjoyment not as a business. Even when you think you have finished it you generally spend more hours tuning it and getting it just right.

    There are not too many guys making pocket knives in numbers and it would be really hard to make it profitable. Factory and low volume CNC type produced knives are of outstanding quality and can be readily had for a few hundred dollars. There are also many decent sub $100 pocket knives so to try and sell these based on any kind of hourly rate is almost impossible unless you have mastered the craft and have a following of people that are prepared to pay.

    However, if you want a really nice pocket knife it will be much cheaper to buy one than lay out the money for equipment and components........ I know that for sure!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    2,788

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Danger Mouse View Post
    I've never sat down and worked it out but I doubt I could finish one in a week working 9-5 just on it.
    I can easily believe that.


    Quote Originally Posted by Danger Mouse View Post
    ...to try and sell these based on any kind of hourly rate is almost impossible unless you have mastered the craft and have a following of people that are prepared to pay.
    I found the same with a couple of batches of titanium/Damascus pens I made for friends and family. They are definitely a labour of love.

    Blue for the boys and pink for the girls:
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Chris

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Tamworth, NSW
    Posts
    119

    Default

    Pens have been on my list for a while and I think I am getting close to making a start on them. I must give these a try soon. Yours look fantastic and well received as gifts I am sure.

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