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Thread: Gcode enquiry

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Gcode enquiry

    How much Gcode knowledge/programming is needed to be able to use CNC milling from the design stage (3d cad) right through to the finished part, I was sort of hoping it would be like 3D printing which I have found to be reasonably painless but on reading posts made on dedicated CNC forums it looks as if a good knowledge of Gcode programming is needed.


    I'm not scared of learning Gcode programming - back when we owned and ran a 7 day Supermarket we found the cost of setting up for scanning at the registers was way more then we could afford at the time, with the introduction of GST on the visible horizon, I undertook to write point of sale software using MS Visual Net Basic, most of it done at home in the evenings and at the shop during lunchtimes, it ended up being fully featured with shelf barcode printing, customer rewards and stock control - we used it for over 5yrs and the new owners used it for 8 yrs until replaced with a commercial equivalent, however now in my old age I'm getting lazy I guess and maybe even have lost a bit of confidence, and I'd rather not learn Gcode if it was possible.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Wallerawang NSW
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    Default

    It's a lot like 3D printing - the G Code is generated by a post processor (normally) in the drafting software you use. If the post processor is set up well for your machine then you won't need to edit it. It is good to be able to read your G Code though to spot mistakes. After some playing around with my post processor (normally with things like tool offsets, coolant delays, spindle control) I am able just to run the g code straight from the post processor with no issues.
    Steve

  3. #3
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    Default

    Thanks for the reply, it looks as if learning Gcode as I go will get me by as long as I have the correct or near enough to correct post processor.

  4. #4
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    Default

    Yes -you will pick it up as you go - if you have done 3D printing a lot of it will be familiar.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Familyguy- what CAD program are you using (or planning to use)

    Steve

  6. #6
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    Default

    I have a copy of autodesk inventor pro (way before I had a 3D printer) and used it on and off for a number of years so I could better visualise projects but a computer update saw me change to fusion360 rather than reinstall inventor pro, been using fusion 360 for a few years now and last year jumped in and purchased a 3D printer, I believe that Autodesk is using all of the non commercial (free) users as beta testers and eventually it will be paid subscription only, if and when that happens I'll have to evaluate my options, I'm not a 'power user' in that I get by and probably do a lot of things the long way around, I get there in the end - most times.

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by familyguy View Post
    I have a copy of autodesk inventor pro (way before I had a 3D printer) and used it on and off for a number of years so I could better visualise projects but a computer update saw me change to fusion360 rather than reinstall inventor pro, been using fusion 360 for a few years now and last year jumped in and purchased a 3D printer, I believe that Autodesk is using all of the non commercial (free) users as beta testers and eventually it will be paid subscription only, if and when that happens I'll have to evaluate my options, I'm not a 'power user' in that I get by and probably do a lot of things the long way around, I get there in the end - most times.
    You are in for a bit of a learning curve, programming for milling is a lot more complicated than 3d printing, but if you have made your own POS system in the past i think you will be clever enough to work it out.

    Autodesk has also pretty much stopped development on all their CAM systems except fusion, Really sucks for us commercial users that cant use fusion. (sorry I'm a bit bitter about it)

  8. #8
    elanjacobs is online now Apprentice gear maker and machine doctor
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    Default

    As others have said, a basic understanding of G code will be very helpful even if your post is well set up.

    The CAD guys at work post everything out from Mastercam, but we still need to be able to make adjustments at the machine, especially on a new program, because the feeds and speeds you think you want aren't always what works bets when the tool meets the work.
    Specialist fine pitch gear cutting from 0.1 Module
    www.rigear.com.au

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Default

    GCode is pretty simple. There are setup codes and then relatively few movement codes (for hobby use, unlikely you'll be doing canned cycles etc)

    You don't need to be able to code by hand to get going.

    You can always Google the relevant GCodes when you need to.

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