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  1. #1
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    Default Emery on the lathe

    I watched this short YouTube video and was surprised by the number of commenters who've had it happen to them. I always hold one end of the emery tape in each hand. I thought everyone did. Apparently not.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5iKM-vC6LM
    Chris

  2. #2
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jack620 View Post
    I always hold one end of the emery tape in each hand. I thought everyone did. Apparently not.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5iKM-vC6LM
    Ditto.... and I would use a much longer length of emery than what Joe was demonstrating with and pull it back
    and forth so it doesn't rub in the one spot.

    cheers, shed

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by shedhappens View Post
    Ditto.... and I would use a much longer length of emery than what Joe was demonstrating with and pull it back
    and forth so it doesn't rub in the one spot.

    cheers, shed
    Yeah I used Emery 5-6 times today and use it fairly often depending on the job/finish.
    I usually rip a strips of different grades around 500-600mm long and they live in the drawer under the lathe.
    I hold it close to the the ends and use the whole strip, unless I'm sanding something intricate up to a corner etc for cosmetic looks, then I fold it in half and sand from one side (I'll post this project soon)

    I've read lots of people won't use Emery on there lathe, same as filing etc. I've got way covers which helps keeps grit out, but even on a lathe without them I'd use it, just keep up good house keeping on the lathe and it won't do any harm.
    Using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    North Yorkshire UK
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    Default

    Hi Guys,

    That is only one way to use abrasive paper on a lathe ! I use a length of hard wood with an abrasive paper glued to it, very much like using a file. The other method is still a stick but a longer length folded over the end !
    I'm not keen on this because its easy to push the abrasive paper off the stick and get it wrapped around the work piece.

    One other trick I've used is to apply abrasive paste to a softwood stick and use it to polish surfaces for bearings and the like.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
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    South of Adelaide
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    Default

    yeah always emery with 2 hands. We use emery on the lathes at work every day, we just wipe the bed down with rags when we are finished, after 10 years all our lathes are fine.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
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    Mallacoota,VIC,Australia
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    Default

    Yeah same as Snapatap, I've always used emery in two hands. This also comes down to why you have to be careful if your using gloves around machinery. I don't use gloves around rotating machinery, but there is certain times when they are necessary.
    All The Best steran50 Stewart

    The shortest way to do many things is to do only one thing at once.

  7. #7
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    Dec 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by steran50 View Post
    Yeah same as Snapatap, I've always used emery in two hands. This also comes down to why you have to be careful if your using gloves around machinery. I don't use gloves around rotating machinery, but there is certain times when they are necessary.
    I cut my finger the other month moving swarf away so it didn't get caught up on the chuck. Ten minutes latter I did another finger, then went and got a pair of pliers lol.
    After all these years you would think I'd be aware, but this swarf was long and razor sharp.

    My neighbour seen my paper towel and eleco tape bandaids while it stoped bleeding on the lathe/job and asked what happened.
    After I told him he suggested gloves, him being a farm sort of guy and not being a machinist thought you wore gloves using machinery. Would rather a cut than to loose a finger or worse.
    Gloves are fine for cleaning up, but I still don't use them, I do see some people on forums wearing those thin medical type of gloves.
    Using Tapatalk

  8. #8
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    Sydney
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    Default Long winded

    The guy in the video does crap on at some length, doesn't he?
    OK, he demonstrated a few things you should not do, but he could have done that in less than half the time.

    Cheers
    Roger

  9. #9
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Perth
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rcaffin View Post
    The guy in the video does crap on at some length, doesn't he?
    OK, he demonstrated a few things you should not do, but he could have done that in less than half the time.
    99% of web vids are like that - lucky there's a fast FWD slider.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
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    Sydney
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    Default Audio

    I just turn the audio off - or remove the headphones.
    Then I run along the slider at the bottom and look at the pics there.

    Cheers
    Roger

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave J View Post
    I cut my finger the other month moving swarf away so it didn't get caught up on the chuck. Ten minutes latter I did another finger, then went and got a pair of pliers...
    One of the first things I did with this lathe was extend the chuck key handles for the cam lock fitting on the lathe (the key originally could not be turned before banging into the chuck) and smaller chucks I have.
    P1040642.JPG
    As by-product, I've discovered that they double as an excellent 'rake' for pulling swarf away.
    I won't touch swarf unless the lathe is stopped or it is dead on the floor. My 3 jaw in particular has a nasty habit of catching a long piece and then pulling up the stuff in the tray. I don't want to be pulling a piece of swarf away at the moment the lathe decides on a tug of war.

    Michael

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Michael G View Post
    One of the first things I did with this lathe was extend the chuck key handles for the cam lock fitting on the lathe (the key originally could not be turned before banging into the chuck) and smaller chucks I have.
    P1040642.JPG
    As by-product, I've discovered that they double as an excellent 'rake' for pulling swarf away.
    I won't touch swarf unless the lathe is stopped or it is dead on the floor. My 3 jaw in particular has a nasty habit of catching a long piece and then pulling up the stuff in the tray. I don't want to be pulling a piece of swarf away at the moment the lathe decides on a tug of war.

    Michael
    I also made up a extended D1-4 handle, I'll have to grab a picture, though I think I posted it years ago.
    I won't go near swarf that I think is going to get caught up, just the loose stuff that's been spat out.
    Really need to make a swarf rake, should put it higher on my list, lol
    Using Tapatalk

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
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    Gippsland Victoria
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    731

    Default Clever gadget to hold emery cloth

    https://www.sponmech.co.uk/sanding-b...for-lathes-p31

    Further down in the comments beneath the video somebody recommends this thing. You could efficiently use the entire length of emery.

    Wouldnt be too hard to make a very much simpler version yourself. Simplest might be a handheld crescent of plywood (ie similar shape to an archery bow)

    Could either be hand held or toolpost mounted.

    Funny thing, when I first started I tried for aaaages to get nice smooth finishes straight off the tool, got there in the end (shear tool) but didnt realise that people commonly used emery.

    Bill

  14. #14
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    Nov 2007
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    melbourne australia
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    Default Emery on the lathe

    Gotta love the alarmist language in the marketing blurb for the tool. Although thereís a link to a document on the use of emery.

    https://www.sponmech.co.uk/files/dow...%20rev%201.pdf

    It shows a way of holding emery cloth in a standard QCTP holder. I think it would be very wasteful of emery though as only a small section of the emery contacts the work.

    And in the photo of the bloke holding emery tape in his hands he has it wrapped around his fingers. Of course youíre going to lose a bloody finger if you do that and it catches. Common sense (yeah, I know) says you pinch it between index finger and thumb. I canít see the danger if you do it that way.
    Chris

  15. #15
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    Sep 2012
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    Default

    Hi Chris, Guys,

    I agree with you ! Whilst I have used abrasive paper in very much the same way, I much prefer the sanding stick method. For sanding and lapping bores, I also use a wooden dowel with a strip of abrasive held in a slit in the end. Not much to get caught that way.

    I've also used those small Dremal flap discs for sanding small bores. Very handy using the drill press as a vertical grinder.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

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