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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Notting Hiĺl (Melb) or Echuca
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    62
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    Default Replacement Stand for 6x4 bandsaw from scrap

    My 6x4 metal cutting bandsaw has earned its keep cutting all manner of steel quietly, but the supplied stand has always been frustrating. .. It was too low, too floppy and did not catch the cuttings.

    Lockdown in Melbourne has provided time to deal with it, but added a constraint that no material could be purchased.

    The result is the stand is made from old water pipe, reclaimed angle iron, an old steel BBQ plate left here 30 years ago when I purchased the place, some bamboo floor boards, some old bolts, and a tin of oil paint I was given by a client in cleanup. Wheels, Welding rods, rust treatment and etch primer were in stock.

    20211010_171830_small.jpg 20211010_171905_small.jpg 20211010_171935_small.jpg

    just to show it is a little higher than the blue original --

    20211010_172038_small.jpg

    I confess it is a little taller than planned as I forgot to allow for the castors, but it is stable... the wheels could be bigger for moving on the lawn however it is ok in the shed. The only real challenge was converting the ~900mm round 1/4" thick BBQ plate into the desired 1000x450mm rectangle and then folding up the edges for the tray. My son's guidance using Freecad to create a template was much appreciated, as is my neighbours' patience with the angle grinder sounds from cutting the steel.
    cheers
    David

    ------------------------------------------------
    A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they’ll never sit in. (Greek proverb)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    Lebrina
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    1,689

    Default

    I like it. Sounds like you hate unnecessary bending over as much as I do.
    It wouldn't take much to set coolant up on that bandsaw now.

  3. #3
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Feb 2006
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    Perth
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    Quote Originally Posted by HavinaGo View Post
    I confess it is a little taller than planned as I forgot to allow for the castors, but it is stable... the wheels could be bigger for moving on the lawn however it is ok in the shed.
    I made my stand about 120 mm taller than the stock stand - I think its good to be able to look down over the blade to make sure it lines up with any cut markings on the stock.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    York, North Yorkshire UK
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    Hi David, Guys,

    27-09-2019-001.jpg

    That is pretty much what I did when I picked up a 6X4 bandsaw quite cheaply and refurbished it. The original stand was total rubbish and far too low.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Notting Hiĺl (Melb) or Echuca
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    Thank you Barron, Bob and Karl for looking and encouraging,

    I went out to the shed and measured the saw on its new table ... The base of the vice next to the blade has ended up at 1040mm above the floor... I was aiming at 900mm but now realise the thickness of the casting base (80mm) and the height of the wheels (90mm) should have been included (subtracted) when calculating the height of vertical pipe posts under the tray.

    Like you Karl, I was over bending. The saw had sat on some 100x100mm timber blocks for the past few years and I knew it needed to be significantly higher. Apart from doing most of my cutting while I was perched on an old canvas camp stool to get the eyes close enough to read the "marks", I had acquired a couple of roller stands and even with the saw on blocks, they could not be set low enough to be used. Maybe I could have shortened them .. as I now need to lift long items higher ... Hmm. If I end up shortening the new saw stand, so be it. Coolant was on my mind only to the extent that I put in the drain now as in my lathe and mill stands I did not put in a drain hole in the tray and have contemplated the effort to dismantle things to add it. My main reason for adding the tray was to stop the collection of cuttings on the "spare" steel under the saw and the inevitable search for that small part in all the accumulated detritus. Before moving the new table inside I cleaned up and was pleasantly surprised to find a piece of 100x100x6mm plate I had thought I had cut 6 months ago, but never used on the original job and had never seen since. Is that a new definition of a black hole?

    Bob, your comment about looking down on the job is a good one... as I said before if I find I am failing to get the perspective of where the blade is relative to a mark, I can always shorten the stand. My multifocal glasses are set at about 450mm so the current cutting height seems to be in range when I am standing next to the saw, but as it was only assembled yesterday I have not tried it... iterative development may well be needed.

    BaronJ your stand is beautiful simplicity and deals with all the wobbles of the original. That motor looks huge. The paint is my preferred colour. My blue stand would self retract the rear wheels when I went to move the saw so that I had to lift the handle end higher and higher to clear the feet from the floor. Inevitably the center of gravity of the motor/cutting arm would then self convert the saw into vertical mode, which lead to a bit of a panic. So one thing I was conscious of was having the motor inside the wheel base at all times, hence the saw being mounted with a big gap at the motor end. Having that requirement meant the cast base of the saw needs to be about 150mm above the table so the motor does not hit the table in vertical mode. Your stand looks like it deals with the stability problem by the splay on the stand putting the castors well behind the motor ... plus you do not need to lift to move. Your design also deals with the splay on the casting attachment points that I had to deal with on assembly. Thanks for sharing.
    cheers
    David

    ------------------------------------------------
    A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they’ll never sit in. (Greek proverb)

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
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    Mackay North Qld
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    5,896

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    Hi David ,

    A very worthwhile project particularly in the increasing of its height.

    A real back saver for sure!

    It is a very nice ,neat job you have made of it, too.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    York, North Yorkshire UK
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    Quote Originally Posted by HavinaGo View Post
    Thank you Baron,

    BaronJ your stand is beautiful simplicity and deals with all the wobbles of the original. That motor looks huge. The paint is my preferred colour. My blue stand would self retract the rear wheels when I went to move the saw so that I had to lift the handle end higher and higher to clear the feet from the floor. Inevitably the centre of gravity of the motor/cutting arm would then self convert the saw into vertical mode, which lead to a bit of a panic. So one thing I was conscious of was having the motor inside the wheel base at all times, hence the saw being mounted with a big gap at the motor end. Having that requirement meant the cast base of the saw needs to be about 150mm above the table so the motor does not hit the table in vertical mode. Your stand looks like it deals with the stability problem by the splay on the stand putting the castors well behind the motor ... plus you do not need to lift to move. Your design also deals with the splay on the casting attachment points that I had to deal with on assembly. Thanks for sharing.
    Thankyou for your kind words ! The style of stand that you have made was my first thoughts until I considered where I wanted to keep it and then how much space it would take up. You have made a nice job of yours.

    This is the WIP thread that I did at the time. The motor is not the original one. I also did a lot of mods as well.

    https://metalworkforums.com/f65/t203...ghlight=BaronJ
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  8. #8
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    Aug 2019
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    Revesby - Sydney Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaronJ View Post
    The motor is not the original one
    Motor looks like it has two rocket boosters attached!

    (assume they are starter capacitors?)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by nigelpearson View Post
    Motor looks like it has two rocket boosters attached!

    (assume they are starter capacitors?)
    Hi Nigel,

    Yes they are the start and run capacitors ! The motor is a 1 Hp Brooks continually rated one. It doesn't have a centrifugal switch like most more modern electric single phase motors. I suspect that the original got damaged when the machine flipped onto its back.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  10. #10
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    Dec 2013
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    Very nice, and free is even better.

    You can build mine and I have everything, I've only owned it for 25 plus years which I bought used as advertised as a power hacksaw, lol.

    I converted to coolant many years ago and gives 5x blade life at least.

    I really need to pull my finger out and build my stand, I have the tray and steel but never seem to get around to it.

    I totally rebuilt and painted my 7x12 bandsaw I bought used years later used, but the pore little 115x150mm saw still runs and cuts true to this day.


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  11. #11
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    Nice job and a great use of reclaimed materials.
    All The Best steran50 Stewart

    The shortest way to do many things is to do only one thing at once.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave J View Post
    Very nice, and free is even better.

    You can build mine and I have everything, I've only owned it for 25 plus years which I bought used as advertised as a power hacksaw, lol.

    I converted to coolant many years ago and gives 5x blade life at least.

    I really need to pull my finger out and build my stand, I have the tray and steel but never seem to get around to it.

    I totally rebuilt and painted my 7x12 bandsaw I bought used years later used, but the pore little 115x150mm saw still runs and cuts true to this day.
    Thank you for the encouragement Dave,
    The "free" was one aspect, but my better half likes the "less stuff lying around" aspect. So two wins from one project.

    As to your project, I can relate to the time aspect ... If you are like me, one day you will get to it! but the stars had to align under a global pandemic.
    Lockdown has stopped a lot of my work and meant the painting of the west window frame has also finally happened. It had been prepared 3, or 4 times over the past 30 years, but only in the past month has it finally had another preparation AND a couple of top coats of paint.
    cheers
    David

    ------------------------------------------------
    A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they’ll never sit in. (Greek proverb)

  13. #13
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    Dec 2009
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    Sydney
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    The original stand could be an (almost) instant 'saw' horse!
    A.
    'Waratah' spring hammer by Hands & Scott c.1911- 20, 'Duffy, Todd & Williams' spring hammer c.1920, Premo lathe- 1953, Premo filing machine.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by AndrewOC View Post
    The original stand could be an (almost) instant 'saw' horse!
    A.
    Greetings Andrew,
    I like your thinking; I read your post and thought why didn't I think of that then I thought about the work to make it happen as the blue thing is probably too light -- it needs something to stop each leg twisting relative to the other .. and something to stop metal edges sinking into the ground (I do a lot of my work on the back lawn). All doable but maybe not by me. If anyone want the panels, send me a pm, otherwise I will reuse the metal.
    cheers
    David

    ------------------------------------------------
    A society grows great when old men plant trees whose shade they’ll never sit in. (Greek proverb)

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