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  1. #46
    Join Date
    May 2018
    Location
    Cairns, Qld.
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    39

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    Fantastic work. Can you tell me what magic pill I could take, to do welds even half as good as those?
    Halifax614

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,356

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Halifax614 View Post
    Fantastic work. Can you tell me what magic pill I could take, to do welds even half as good as those?
    Halifax614
    Thanks for the praise mate, but I'm definitely an amateur and not a skilled welder! Unfortunately no pills that I know of either or I'd have downed a few myself

    On a serious note I've been melting things together for well over 40 years and while I'm not a real welders armpit, I can generally make them stick well enough for what I build or repair. The closest to a magic pill I can offer is the advice that its mostly about the weld pool. You first need to be able to see it properly, and then its really just a case of making sure its melting both parts.
    A weld pool practice technique I was taught many years ago for gas welding also works great for TIG. Just grab a couple of bits of 1.6mm sheet metal about 100mm square. Lay them on top of each other and match up two edges then clamp vertically in the vice so the matched edge is horizontal.
    Then fire up your torch and run along the edge and weld it - without using any filler. Once you've got that under control then do the same but with the pieces at right angles - ie an outside corner weld - again without using any filler. When you blow a hole in it (and you will) then just stop and move on to a fresh area.
    Once you've got that sussed, then you'll have a good feel of what its like to have the weld pool under control.
    At that point you can start playing with filler rod and fillet welds etc where you need to have the filler to supply the extra material.
    It might not be a conventional suggestion for learning to weld, but I've personally found it worked well for me and the couple of people I've shown it to over the years. If you're struggling to learn then give it a go!

    Steve

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    4,215

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    Hi Steve, Guys,

    Not as heavy as I thought ! I expected nearer a ton. It looks very substantial. It makes the H&F ones look very puny.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    4,215

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OxxAndBert View Post
    Thanks for the praise mate, but I'm definitely an amateur and not a skilled welder! Unfortunately no pills that I know of either or I'd have downed a few myself

    On a serious note I've been melting things together for well over 40 years and while I'm not a real welders armpit, I can generally make them stick well enough for what I build or repair. The closest to a magic pill I can offer is the advice that its mostly about the weld pool. You first need to be able to see it properly, and then its really just a case of making sure its melting both parts.
    A weld pool practice technique I was taught many years ago for gas welding also works great for TIG. Just grab a couple of bits of 1.6mm sheet metal about 100mm square. Lay them on top of each other and match up two edges then clamp vertically in the vice so the matched edge is horizontal.
    Then fire up your torch and run along the edge and weld it - without using any filler. Once you've got that under control then do the same but with the pieces at right angles - ie an outside corner weld - again without using any filler. When you blow a hole in it (and you will) then just stop and move on to a fresh area.
    Once you've got that sussed, then you'll have a good feel of what its like to have the weld pool under control.
    At that point you can start playing with filler rod and fillet welds etc where you need to have the filler to supply the extra material.
    It might not be a conventional suggestion for learning to weld, but I've personally found it worked well for me and the couple of people I've shown it to over the years. If you're struggling to learn then give it a go!

    Steve
    Hi Guys,

    Many years ago I was quite skilled at furnace welding cast iron. Then I recently had need to weld up a new frame for my bandsaw. I found that I couldn't weld for toffee any more. I was very lucky to have a friend that was in a position to teach me how to stick and TIG weld. He did and said very much the same as Steve has said above. It took me a while to learn all over again.

    Anyone want a stick welder very cheap Only kidding...
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,356

    Default

    Waiting for some hydraulic fittings to arrive, so got busy with the paint brush.
    Almost looks like a bought one!!




    Steve

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    4,215

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    Hi Steve,

    That is a mean machine ! It ainít going to take prisoners. Its really nice !

    Re: "Joe Pieczynski's" video. Yes I had seen that one, thanks for the link anyway.
    I'll post more later. At the moment I'm turning a piece of 45 mm hydraulic piston shaft down to 30 mm. This stuff is hardened on the outside and it goes about 1.5 mm deep. Tough stuff, I very rarely see blue swarf.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    4,471

    Default

    Thats looking nice.

    Bet you can't wait to crush some stuff!

    Powered workshop press build

    Simon

    Sent from my SM-G970F using Tapatalk
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,356

    Default

    Definitely looking forward to having it going. Have a particular project to do that involves a bit of 6mm plate bending.
    One thing I won't be doing is a Youtube style "look at this - wow - didn't expect that to go bang and bounce around the workshop"

    Steve

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,356

    Default Powered workshop press build

    Selector valve and hoses connected.
    Selector is just a cheapie log splitter one from eBay.
    When it comes to plumbing of any sort, it doesnít seem to matter how many fittings I get - Iím always a couple wrong or short








    Still havenít decided how to mount the selector. Might make some sort of plate that hooks into one of the pin holes.
    All looks very temporary at the moment.


    Steve

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,356

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    Its alive!!!

    Think I'm allowed to post a link to the Youtube video of it running, but if not then mods please remove the link and you can find it by searching in Google for "youtube OxxAndBert press"



    I timed the travel and its 33s down, and 25s up.
    I think its a good pressing speed, but I'd like it to be a bit faster for positioning.
    I'll have a look at the flow restrictors on the power pack but the pump is only 4LPM so its likely as good as it gets without a pump change.

    Still a bit to do before its finished, but nice to finally have it working.

    Steve

  11. #56
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
    Age
    68
    Posts
    4,767

    Default

    Nice work Steve.
    On the end of the shaft, is that a replaceable tip??? Asking as if not, you may want to set up some sort of protector as sometimes the ends can mushroom. Plus it will allow you to fit different types of ends, i.e. a chisel to spread something apart, or a blade for a brake press, etc.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Age
    54
    Posts
    1,356

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    Thanks Kryn.

    Yes, itís a screw in replaceable end -for exactly those reasons.

    Steve

  13. #58
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Rockhampton, QLD
    Age
    65
    Posts
    330

    Default

    I bet that was a satisfying feeling seeing it go down and up. Nicely done Steve.

    Ross

  14. #59
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Location
    Geelong, Australia
    Age
    54
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    1,356

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    Thanks Ross.
    Yes, very satisfying. Also glad that I painted it before I fired it up as I had the obligatory leaks and it would have been hard to get it cleaned up enough for painting afterwards. Anyone who looked at the vid might have noticed the dripping

    Steve

  15. #60
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    4,215

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    Hi Steve, Guys,

    Pity you are about as far away as you can get, because I have a tube of Locktite hydraulic thread seal that you could have had. Its a 550 ml tube that I've never opened and will never use. It mentions on the tube that it can be used for steam pipe threads as well.
    Best Regards:
    Baron J.

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