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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    249

    Default Mag wheel nut cactus ! How to get off?

    A mate who’s doing it a bit tough has bought a Toyota Lightace and possibly started down a rabbit hole.
    Its a grey import, which he didn’t realise till he went to buy bits for it.

    Anyhu latest drama some clown has used a cold chisel to try and remove a mag wheel nut.
    They are normally undone with a 12mm Allen head adapter for a wheel brace.
    Studs seam a bit long so 12mm Allen head doesn’t get much grip, probably the start of the problem.
    I’ve suggested welding something onto the damaged area but that will only give a quarter turn at best. Or a Allen driver into the nut.
    This plus the heat from the welding may enable the nut to be started.
    Any thoughts?
    He is talking about drilling the stud out in situ but this seems like hard work to me?
    I’ve given it a swirt of reuducter bolt buster which I use for frozen stuff myself.
    H.
    Photos show new nut and Allen driver,
    Damaged nut on wheel.
    Driver in undamaged nut for depth of engagement.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by clear out; 25th Sep 2021 at 03:20 PM. Reason: I never could spell but this gets embarrassing.
    Jimcracks for the rich and/or wealthy. (aka GKB '88)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,383

    Default

    Just split the nut length wise with a cold chisel or if you have access a air hammer, stud is most likely damaged and will need to be replaced

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Country West Oz
    Age
    75
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    Just split the nut length wise with a cold chisel or if you have access a air hammer, stud is most likely damaged and will need to be replaced
    I think that this would be very difficult without damaging the wheel.

    I would weld a bolt that just fits into the socket ,12mm? , as stated above the heat may well loosen the nut and hopefully it should be able to be undone using a spanner on the head of the bolt.
    Whatever you do will require care not to damage the wheel.
    Good luck.
    Regards
    Bradford

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    N.W.Tasmania
    Posts
    1,317

    Default

    With the limited access available, it might be difficult to split the nut with a cold chisel, I think that I would go with welding something onto the nut. If the nut was ground out with a rotary burr in the weld area, it should be possible to weld a 12mm bolt to the nut, and if the bolt was ground out with a U or V shape for the weld, it should be possible to get a full turn on the bolt, without running into clearance issues. After a partial turn, more weld could be added to the newly exposed section. Any lumps could be ground down or even left there if not too bad, although they would scratch the wheel a bit. A tig welder might be pretty handy here if you have one available and have the necessary expertise to use it. Good luck
    Edit: Bradford well and truly beat me to it.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    North Brisbane. Qld. Australia
    Age
    67
    Posts
    1,102

    Default

    If you let me know what the Model and Frame numbers are for the vehicle, I can help with part number searches.
    Nev.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    57
    Posts
    200

    Default

    There are wheel nut removers but they need space to go over the nut which you do not have. If the intent is to reuse the wheels then I would probably drill the stud as well.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    se Melbourne
    Age
    60
    Posts
    46

    Default

    What ever method you use, I would suggest that the other wheel nuts, or at least the adjoining ones are on and done up tight. This might relieve a fraction of tension on the problem nut.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ipswich QLD
    Age
    65
    Posts
    1,956

    Default

    Not sure pne will fit but a stud removal tool might be worth giiving a try

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/17480493...AaAjd2EALw_wcB
    Sent from my SM-T580 using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    249

    Default

    Thanks Ray and everyone else for your input.
    I guess we’ll be having a go at this next week.
    That stud remover will probably be needed as we’re sure to mangle the stud getting the nut off.
    H.
    Jimcracks for the rich and/or wealthy. (aka GKB '88)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    57
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    200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by clear out View Post
    Thanks Ray and everyone else for your input.
    I guess we’ll be having a go at this next week.
    That stud remover will probably be needed as we’re sure to mangle the stud getting the nut off.
    H.

    Most wheel studs are interference push fit with splines and a head on the backside, you press them in and out. Do not use a stud remover to attempt to unscrew it.

    stud.jpg

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by droog View Post
    Most wheel studs are interference push fit with splines and a head on the backside, you press them in and out. Do not use a stud remover to attempt to unscrew it.

    stud.jpg
    Droog,

    Is right on the money, I would be trying to use a cold chisel to split the nut.
    I’ve done this many times in a past career(Panel Beater).
    Granted it’s not easy,you do need to be careful especially if your trying to safe the wheel.
    And the chisel needs to be sharp, an it can be difficult.
    Once the wheel is removed you can then knock the stud through, from the front with a heavy punch an hammer.

    Cheers Matt.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simplicity View Post
    Droog,

    Is right on the money, I would be trying to use a cold chisel to split the nut.
    I’ve done this many times in a past career(Panel Beater).
    Granted it’s not easy,you do need to be careful especially if your trying to safe the wheel.
    And the chisel needs to be sharp, an it can be difficult.
    Once the wheel is removed you can then knock the stud through, from the front with a heavy punch an hammer.

    Cheers Matt.
    I totally agree, except that a slightly blunt chisel will be better if you are trying to undo the nut rather than split it. Another way, provided that you can remove the brake caliper with the wheel in place, is to undo the axle nut and remove the hub and wheel from the axle as a unit. You will then have access to the flange of the wheel stud which can be drilled or ground away, allowing the body of the stud to be punched forward thru the hub. This may not work if the brake rotor is fastened to the hub with screws.

    Chas.
    Last edited by Chas; 26th Sep 2021 at 06:40 PM. Reason: Added caution.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Ipswich QLD
    Age
    65
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    1,956

    Default

    Sorry henry I meant to use the stud remove on the nut. As has been said studs for wheels are spline fitted.

    Dremel grind or similar 2 sides of the nut as far through as possible then split it.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    57
    Posts
    200

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wheelinround View Post
    Sorry henry I meant to use the stud remove on the nut.

    The nut is located well below the surface of the wheel for more than 50% of its circumference, there are specific tools just for this purpose but if the aim is to reuse the wheel none of them will work in this case.

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/311505369471

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    106

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by droog View Post
    The nut is located well below the surface of the wheel for more than 50% of its circumference, there are specific tools just for this purpose but if the aim is to reuse the wheel none of them will work in this case.

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/311505369471
    It might be possible to cut the stud out of the centre of the nut by using an end-mill of the same size as the stud and held in an electric drill. As the stud is heat treated, this will not be easy. Another thought is to use a carbide drill in the same manner.

    Chas.

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