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Thread: Fuel Tanks

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Goldcoast
    Posts
    78

    Default Fuel Tanks

    Workin on my fuel tank.

    I blasted and painted it before I checked for leaks.

    Im thinking of putting plain fuel in and looking for fuel seeping out.

    Does anyone have any suggestions ?

    Randal
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh
    Posts
    618

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    Does it look like it will leak, if not generally they won't. I had a tank that developed pin holes through all one side of it due to bad design so I emptied it and fibreglassed the corroded areas and it never leaked again while I owned the car. Petrol will sort out whether it has leaks and glassing any gets around welding the thing.
    CHRIS

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
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    72
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    5,991

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    Hi Randal,
    How I used to test my tanks, when I made them, was to seal all the outlet/inlet points bar one, that had a T piece fitted that allowed for an airline fitting and a pressure release valve. Compressed air was pumped in at around 4 PSI, with the release valve set at 5 just for safety. Water with dishwashing liquid (about 1/4 cup to a litre) was sprayed/brushed onto the tank. Spray application was with spray bottle, windex type.Make sure that you check to bottom of the tank well, as that is where any rust is normally found. Should you find any leaks, they can be be soldered using a soldering iron, without any cause for concern, DO NOT USE NAKED FLAME on a soldering iron.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Laidley, SE Qld
    Posts
    1,040

    Default

    I'd go with the very low PSI air pressure test, another way to check for bubbles is to dunk the tank in a paddling pool or similar.

    If the air pressure test is not feasible I would fill with water and check for leaks rather than petrol. That makes things safer if subsequent repairs are required.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Near Bendigo, Victoria, AUS
    Age
    72
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    3,115

    Default

    Water is a good test (small molecules) as long as you break the surface tension with some dish washing detergent!
    I'd go with that, in case you need to do some subsequent welding, as Bod mentioned.
    Cheers, Joe
    retired - less energy, more time to contemplate projects and more shed time....

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Melbourne
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    54
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    825

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    G'day Randal,
    It's probably best to check for leaks before painting the tank as the paint itself can act as a short term sealant and mask small leaks for a while. Also if there are leaks, fixing them will probably bugger your paint job anyway.

    When repairing old soldered stationary engine fuel tanks I colour in the repaired area with a permanent marker then fill the tank with enough petrol to cover the repair. If there is any porosity whatsoever in the patch or seam the texta will run when it's exposed to even tiny amounts of petrol.

    I find this method works well as there's no chance of getting water in the tank which then needs to be dried out and no risk of the tank approximating the shape of a sphere if you get the pressure wrong with the air compressor.

    I also flush the tank with metho and purge with argon before soldering as igniting any residual fuel vapour can leave you with a spherical tank and no eye brows.
    Cheers,
    Greg.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Syd
    Posts
    492

    Default

    There is a sloshing sealing compound available locally, can't remember the name but have a tin somewhere, for the simplest solution. If you want to weld, did some Ferrari pos alloy tanks with pin holes a while back, purged with exhaust gases, water was sufficient to identify, doesn't take much to dry em out. Steel tanks that have internal rust might need a few dozen nuts and bolts tossed inside and agitated for a fair while to salvage them, if you want to make sure you're not repairing a sieve and avoid repeats.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Goldcoast
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Guys
    I did a quick Google on fuel tank sealing systems. There are a few that are available in Australia - PU,s and Epoxies.

    Main in thing at the moment is to do some tests and see what I get.

    The reason why I'm being a bit anal is the fuel tank sits over the engine in the rear of the car ... The one consultation is the fuel is a two stroke mix.

    Randal

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Theebine, QLD, Australia
    Age
    24
    Posts
    11

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    Hey Randal, I think you should look into some red kote fuel tank liner I used it on a tractor fuel tank that was full of pinholes (washed it out with acetone first) and that was about 2 years ago haven't had a problem since Fuel Tank and Radiator Service - Red-Kote® - Fuel Tank Liner

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Goldcoast
    Posts
    78

    Default

    Yep found it and a supplier on the GC. Looks like it's similar to some of those products used for radiators.

    In the Red Kote blurb it mentions that a lot of inside rust is caused by moisture in the fuel. Treatments line the tank and stop moisture and I guess oxygen getting to the metal.I never really thought about it I must say


    Will keep you posted. Many thanks. Ta. Randal

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