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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Tasmania
    Posts
    41

    Default Hammer head weight markings

    Hi

    As I'm having a bit of an OCD moment, I was wondering if there is a convention for where the weight of a hammer head is stamped. I have a few sledge hammers and ball pein hammers to re-handle. Most of these have a weight stamped on them in ounces or pounds on a side where the hole for the handle is rather than on the cheek. I think that a lot of new sledges have the handle inserted from the marked side. Is this usual? Is there a reason for why it's done in a particular way? I know that in most cases for a "symmetrical" style hammer head it makes no difference, just interested, that's all.

    Simon

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,225

    Default

    Does not matter where the markings are although it does matter which way you insert the handle as the socket for the handle is tapered

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Tasmania
    Posts
    41

    Default

    Thanks China,

    I am aware of the taper in hammer heads. Are you suggesting that some hammer heads are tapered from one side only? I can't remember ever seeing one, not to say that they don't exist.

    As far as the weight marking goes, I can see where its position might be helpful when your put your hammers in a rack. Probably more for a "stocktake" purpose more that anything. I generally grab a hammer that's about the right size for what I want to do rather than worry about how much it weighs. Currently my hammer collection is spread about the workshop sitting on various horizontal surfaces and are mostly lost or misplaced when I want a particular one. I have at least 6 claw hammers, but don't ask me where they all are. I need a hammer rack of some sort, so it makes sense, perhaps to handle the hammer so that the weight shows when it's at home in the rack. My thinking for this is on the wedge side if you store hammers head upwards.... but most of my sledges are stored standing head down on the floor.

    Simon

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    1,225

    Default

    Yes some hammers are tapered in one direction only

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2001
    Location
    ACT
    Posts
    569

    Default

    different makers had a different place where they would put the weight markings. Hytest sledges generally had it on the side the handle was inserted from. Older cyclone ball peins were on what I call the left hand (side) face, then some later ones are marked in grams on the top large groove/fuller. many other hammer makers also put it on the left hand (side) face.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mackay North Qld
    Posts
    5,522

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by XJ9OX View Post
    I need a hammer rack of some sort, so it makes sense, perhaps to handle the hammer so that the weight shows when it's at home in the rack. My thinking for this is on the wedge side if you store hammers head upwards.... but most of my sledges are stored standing head down on the floor.
    Weigh the buggers and mark using oil based metal marker on the cheek to denote the weight.

    A Potential health and safety warning is that weighing the hammers is best done when the house manager is absent.She don't like me using her kitchen scales

    Would something like like this suffice to rack your hammers ? each set of 8mm bars racks about 4 hammers depending on sizing.

    20201202_133903.jpg
    The camera reversed this photo but you get the general idea. I have twice as many hammers now and they all need a home so I need to make a bigger one.It was a temporary fix 6 years ago.

    Grahame

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mackay North Qld
    Posts
    5,522

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    Does not matter where the markings are although it does matter which way you insert the handle as the socket for the handle is tapered

    I think what China is trying to convey is that the taper runs from bottom to top meaning small in the handle end and wider at the wedge end.

    With the wedge fitted tightly, the hammer head cannot part company under the impetus of a full blooded swing. After I had someones else's hammer head whistle pass my head I tended to keep an eye on such things on my own hammers.

    I seen some hammer heads where there was a radius radius at the oval opening at the bottom. i think this was to fit the handle and avoided a sharp change in direction where the grain might get cut across and weaken the handle at that critical point.

    That is where they break when the mumby's that can't use them properly miss the object being struck and impact on the handle. I hated letting anyone else use my hammers for that reason.

    Grahame

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Tasmania
    Posts
    41

    Default

    Thanks Grahame. I think I'll need a bigger hammer rack too once I can find all my hammers and get them mostly in one place. I'm sure that your hanging system could be extended to suit. I'll probably make a floor standing model.

    I'll second your comment about those "mumbys". I helped a neighbour build his stockyards a couple of years ago. In my selection of tools was another neighbour's small claw hammer that I had picked up mistaking it for my own. Neighbour number 1 (not "1" because he is high ranking either) proceeded to attempt to pull out 6" nails from the 60's out of hardwood posts. Needless to say, the head and the handle parted company only to be thrown in the bin with some comment about cheap and nasty hammers. I retrieved the hammer and made a new hardwood handle for it and returned it to the rightful owner at least as good as I got it and without any apology from neighbour 1. This particular neighbour is such a "mumby" that I later caught him trying to use my Grandfather's stone hammer as a crow bar. I was pretty peeved about the bruises and splinters left on the handle, especially since the hammer was so well cared for prior to this. Of course, the next time I picked it up in my workshop to smash up some concrete, the head stayed on the floor leaving me holding a splintery "baseball bat". I still regret not using that bat for it's intended purpose and prevent any more damage being done to innocent tools. I already though I was fairly particular about who I even allow to look at my tools, but now I am worse. Books and tools should never be let out of your sight.

    Simon

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Townsville, Tropical Nth Qld.
    Posts
    185

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by China View Post
    Yes some hammers are tapered in one direction only
    That's interesting, I have done hundreds of Ball Pein and sledges of all weights and I have never seen one like that, only tapered both sides. So I guess one will come into the shop next week and surprise me.
    Rgds,
    Crocy

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