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  1. #1
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    Default Turcite or Rulon?

    Just a bit curious, has anyone here refurbished their 260 saddle and tailstock base with Turcite or Rulon?

    Cheers, Craig.

  2. #2
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    Probably whatever you can buy.

    You do not do tailstock bases as you will not be able to clamp it as it is so slippery.
    Gold, the colour of choice for the discerning person.

  3. #3
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    Yeah what RC says. Although if it's just between the tailstock and base brass shim stock would do just fine.

    Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys. That makes sense. Don't really want the tailstock slipping around!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by .RC. View Post
    Probably whatever you can buy.

    You do not do tailstock bases as you will not be able to clamp it as it is so slippery.
    Interesting, Id have thought the clamp underneath would have been enough to stop it slipping.
    A slippery tailstock is great for drilling deep holes - saves a lot of cranking on the quill !

    Does that also mean that carriage/way clamps on turcite refurbished machines are ineffective?

    Steve

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smoothoperator View Post
    Just a bit curious, has anyone here refurbished their 260 saddle and tailstock base with Turcite or Rulon?

    Cheers, Craig.
    I put brass shim stock between the base and the upper section of the tailstock and that did the trick for me
    It didn't need much, and it has saved breaking centre drills

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by OxxAndBert View Post
    Interesting, Id have thought the clamp underneath would have been enough to stop it slipping.
    A slippery tailstock is great for drilling deep holes - saves a lot of cranking on the quill !

    Does that also mean that carriage/way clamps on turcite refurbished machines are ineffective?

    Steve
    Good point Steve. I also note that some of the new mills from H & F have Turcite on the ways/dovetails. I assume they must be using some pretty special clamping to hold it all in place?

    Craig.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by OxxAndBert View Post
    Does that also mean that carriage/way clamps on turcite refurbished machines are ineffective?

    Steve
    Not ineffective, just not as strong.
    Gold, the colour of choice for the discerning person.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smoothoperator View Post
    Just a bit curious, has anyone here refurbished their 260 saddle and tailstock base with Turcite or Rulon?
    Cheers, Craig.
    Interesting question and, a page later, still no answer.
    Comments about not using turcite on the tailstock could be considered of secondary importance, if someone answered the question by saying, for instance: "Yes, I did it and it worked like a charm".
    The clamp beneath the tailstock has 4 tiny bearing points its bedway, so the clamping pressure on these will be quite high relative to the pressure between the tailstock and the main ways. I am confident that this is not a mere coincedence, and that this is where most of the 'locking' takes place. Turcite is slippery but it's not magic, and it's unlikely that any reduced friction on the main bedway, will be able to be able to overcome the effect of locking forces on these points, which will remain high.
    Like the OP, I'd love to hear form someone who's done the job, to get a clear view of the advantages and disadvantages, if any.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Freddie View Post
    Interesting question and, a page later, still no answer.
    Comments about not using turcite on the tailstock could be considered of secondary importance, if someone answered the question by saying, for instance: "Yes, I did it and it worked like a charm".
    The clamp beneath the tailstock has 4 tiny bearing points its bedway, so the clamping pressure on these will be quite high relative to the pressure between the tailstock and the main ways. I am confident that this is not a mere coincedence, and that this is where most of the 'locking' takes place. Turcite is slippery but it's not magic, and it's unlikely that any reduced friction on the main bedway, will be able to be able to overcome the effect of locking forces on these points, which will remain high.
    Like the OP, I'd love to hear form someone who's done the job, to get a clear view of the advantages and disadvantages, if any.
    Thank you Fast Freddie, I could not have said that better myself! It does seem no-one here has had too much experience with this higher level tech. I have a spare saddle now (needs a bit of a repair and some machining) So I'm not too concerned about messing up since I already have a good working one, so I might exercise the mill and scraper and give it a go!

    Seems like it could be a great option for a soft-bed lathe.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fast Freddie View Post
    Interesting question and, a page later, still no answer.
    Comments about not using turcite on the tailstock could be considered of secondary importance, if someone answered the question by saying, for instance: "Yes, I did it and it worked like a charm".
    If we follow that logic couldn't "260" be considered of secondary importance, then question becomes "can turcite do what it was designed to do and has been used world wide for many years on who knows how many 1000 machines to do?". I think the answer is in on that. What is it about a 260 that would magically stop it from doing its job? Just how deep do you think the pool of people that have bothered to use turcite on a 260 is?

    Quote Originally Posted by Smoothoperator View Post
    It does seem no-one here has had too much experience with this higher level tech.
    There are at least a few that have some experience, but it sure feels like you are asking how to change brakes on a red commodore, not wanting answers from people that own a commodore of some other color, then complaining that you've got no answers.

  12. #12
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    Feel free to turcite whatever you feel like but just be aware that with a turcite element moving around they need a pretty hardcore way wiper/scraper otherwise all the crud embeds in the soft turcite and will tear the joint up. I highly doubt you would see any friction problems but it may have more crush when you really gronk down on the locking lever

  13. #13
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    Default Rulon/Turcite - Way oil.

    Quote Originally Posted by Smoothoperator View Post
    Just a bit curious, has anyone here refurbished their 260 saddle and tailstock base with Turcite or Rulon?

    Cheers, Craig.
    Pretty sure what I used was Rulon, came up great, easy to hand scrape as well.
    However, Here's a question for you guys. If I have restored my cross slide with Turcite or Rulon, do I still need to use way oil?
    Saddle Turcite (5).jpg

  14. #14
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    As a general rule, you only need oil on the ways you want to keep
    Specialist fine pitch gear cutting from 0.1 Module
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