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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    south australia
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jack620 View Post
    My AXA tool holder with 16mm slot.
    Best addition I ever bought, only chinese though but worth every cent & yes you soon get a draw full of holders.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    2,307

    Default

    Just to clarify- I have an Aloris QCTP but all my tool holders are Chinese. The Aloris tool holders are crazy prices and I can't see the value in them. I've never had a problem with a Chinese holder.
    Chris

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    87

    Default

    I'm not sure it's exactly an apples-to-apples comparison, but virtually everything I buy for my Tig welding is Chinese made and it does the job just fine for a tiny fraction of the cost of the US/Japan made stuff. Asa a hobbyist, I simply can't afford the on-brand gear.

    Likewise, I have started out with China carbide inserts for my lathe and they are working out just fine. So based on this, I don't have any problem going with a China QCTP...we'll see how it goes and I'll report my findings right here.


    Moz

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    N.W.Tasmania
    Posts
    1,102

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MosquitoGarage View Post
    I'm not sure it's exactly an apples-to-apples comparison, but virtually everything I buy for my Tig welding is Chinese made and it does the job just fine for a tiny fraction of the cost of the US/Japan made stuff. Asa a hobbyist, I simply can't afford the on-brand gear.

    Likewise, I have started out with China carbide inserts for my lathe and they are working out just fine. So based on this, I don't have any problem going with a China QCTP...we'll see how it goes and I'll report my findings right here.


    Moz
    I can't speak from personal experience, as I use mostly HSS, but other members here have said that name brand carbide turns up on eBay from time to time, so if you keep your eyes peeled, it is possible to snaffle stuff like Seko and Kennemetal at good prices. Of course it might be much easier to get stuff for larger industrial sized machines than it is to get inserts to fit mini lathes, I simply have no idea on that
    No doubt some of the Chinese stuff will be of good quality anyway, quite a few reviews of Banggood tooling, with plenty of it quite favourable. I look forward to hearing of your experience with the QCTP you end up getting

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Location
    South Australia
    Posts
    87

    Default

    I've purchased a little bit of Chinesium carbide tooling already and thus far, my experience has all been positive.

    (Mind you, I am very new to all this.)

    In particular, I am using a negative rake WNMG that online knowledge says should not be ideal unless used on a high powered lathe, but it seems to work just fine on the Hercus as long as I keep the speeds up.

    Will definitely report my findings on a QCTP when I have one.


    Moz

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Perth Western Australia
    Age
    60
    Posts
    117

    Default ASA toolholders

    As you know the largest capacity tool holder Aloris makes for the ASA toolpost is 5/8".
    However Dorian make a 3/4 " inch toolholder for the ASA.
    I have a mixture of chinese and genuine toolholders on my genuine Aloris toolpost plus one Dorian,I find the chinese ones fine for general turning and boring.
    However I don't regret for one second spending big money on a ASA 71 parting tool and a ASA 20 toolholder. I love them both.

    https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/DORIAN-T...53.m1438.l2649

    Cheers Mark
    I've become a tool of my tools.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    9

    Default

    I've got the Chinese (BOSTAR) wedge type AXA and it's a great modification. I also have 18 tool holders at an affordable price.

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Slightly left of Vernon, BC Canada
    Posts
    70

    Default

    Hi boys,

    Following this thread for a while now, I'm in the same boat, looking for a QCTP, I have two 260's each have completely different compounds, and the tool post mounts are both different. One is a T slot, the other has a 1/2" vertical shaft for a turnstile type tool holder.

    Could you please post some pictures of your QCTP mounted on the lathe so I can see how they are mounted to the various styles carriages?

    Cheers

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    sydney ( st marys )
    Age
    60
    Posts
    4,267

    Default

    One would be mounted via tool post stud to the tee nut, the other would be mounted via tool post stud to1/2" thread in compound, you would need to make, buy or get someone to make the different studs for you.
    Not hard to source or hard to make.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Norwood-ish, Adelaide
    Age
    54
    Posts
    5,257

    Default

    Neither style of mount is difficult.
    This is my lathe with a T slot mount.
    Rock steady (Medium).JPG
    As you can see, it is just a T nut with a stud running through the QCTP.

    The stud type will either require spaces so that the post will sit snugly on the stud or possibly removing the stud and turning a new one to suit if the current stud diameter is greater than the tool post bore.

    Michael

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kilohertz View Post
    Hi boys,

    Following this thread for a while now, I'm in the same boat, looking for a QCTP, I have two 260's each have completely different compounds, and the tool post mounts are both different. One is a T slot, the other has a 1/2" vertical shaft for a turnstile type tool holder.

    Could you please post some pictures of your QCTP mounted on the lathe so I can see how they are mounted to the various styles carriages?

    Cheers

    20171029_093607.jpg

    I made the post with the 12g thread for the compound and the metric thread to fit the nut - can't remember which size it is. Also milled spanner flats in the middle so I can tighten the post on the compound.

    20180727_115507.jpg

    Works like a dream but the hex nut will one day have a lever to make it easier to loosen and rotate the whole thing on the compound.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Norwood-ish, Adelaide
    Age
    54
    Posts
    5,257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Ludwig View Post
    ...but the hex nut will one day have a lever to make it easier to loosen and rotate the whole thing on the compound.
    I have an opposing view to that concept -
    I have my QCTP dowelled to the Tee-nut, so that it does not rotate easily - I find that with the size lathe I have, the post can rotate if I take heavy cuts, and I rarely (less than once a year) need to rotate the post on the compound. Why?

    • All my single point threading is done using the plunge method.
    • I have holders made up and fitted with 60 and 90 degree tools, so if I want a 45 degree chamfer for example, I just put in the 90 degree tool and off I go.


    For home use it is not so important, but imagine if you were making say 6 spacers from diameter 20 material that had to be faced on one end, chamfered and parted. Every time you move the compound or rotate the tool post, it needs to be reset (especially when parting) so the tool is square to the lathe axis. If you chamfer by rotating the toolpost/ compound, you spend most of your time when doing this job putting things back to how they were. I cannot see that being allowed in a commercial environment.

    Michael

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    melbourne australia
    Posts
    2,307

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael G View Post
    ... I rarely (less than once a year) need to rotate the post on the compound. Why?
    It's a good question and one I was pondering the other day. I was cutting the 8 degree taper in my new ER40 collet chuck with a carbide insert (I finished up with HSS because it gave a better finish). I got to wondering if the QCTP should also be rotated by 8 degrees so the tool is cutting parallel to the surface. Are carbide tools are designed to present to the work at a specific angle?

    Take an extreme example of cutting a 45 degree taper with the compound. If you don't also rotate the QCTP by 45 degrees the insert will be cutting at an angle to the surface that's 45 degrees different to what it normally would. Surely that will effect the finish? So rightly or wrongly, I usually set the QCTP angle to match the compound angle.

    For cutting threads on smaller lathes I believe the offset method gives better results than the plunge method. I have to admit I haven't done enough single pointing to know.

    P.S. I bought a cheap ring spanner to fit the QCTP nut and hung it on a hook behind the lathe.
    Chris

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    sydney ( st marys )
    Age
    60
    Posts
    4,267

    Default

    I may be an exception to this type of practice, I will quite often rotate my quick change tool post to suit the job at hand eitherwhen using HSS on rare occasions or Carbide whether indexable or cemented.

    I dont find it hard or time consuming to square the tool post up for threading internal/ external or parting, which in my case is generally the only time I need my tool post square to the spindle.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Norwood-ish, Adelaide
    Age
    54
    Posts
    5,257

    Default

    I should clarify that I do rotate the compound to suit the job at hand, but the tool post will stay put, so the tool is always at the same orientation relative to the direction of travel (which if I have rotated the compound for some reason is the compound axis). In fact if you are using CCMT inserts (as I do), you can only move the insert +/- 5 degrees from the axis of travel before they foul. So when I've made collet chucks, the QCTP stays in the same position relative to the compound screw, while the compound is rotated to suit the angle

    I haven't read, seen or been told anything that says one way is good and the other will lead to eternal damnation, but thinking it through most of the time the tool post does not need to rotate on the compound (with clarifier - even if the compound is rotated), if you have the right tools set up.

    Michael

    PS I have heard the reasoning that offset cutting gets better results on smaller lathes due to lower tool forces, but if you are cutting a nut that gets difficult, particularly if the nut is small and/or long. If you cut nuts using a plunge technique with the relatively weak tools needed to get in the part, why with a more rigid and stronger tool would you revert to an offset technique for an exterior thread?

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