Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234
Results 46 to 58 of 58
  1. #46
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Near Bendigo, Victoria, AUS
    Age
    68
    Posts
    2,697

    Default

    There are lots of these on Aliexpress, Banggod and eBay. Some come with 0.6mm wheels (mine did by request) and knurled wheels are also available. Your current wheels may even fit.
    My welder is a generic type - can't recall the brand. An old Made in England one, identical to the multitudes of Chinese ones.
    Cheers, Joe
    again completely retired - more time to contemplate projects and spend more shed time....

  2. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Gosford
    Age
    58
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Thanks. The original Cigweld rollers are completely different and wont fit. I've contacted the seller so I'll wait and see. If I don't have any real joy I'd rather direct any money towards a replacement welder which I think is becoming more likely.

  3. #48
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    987

    Default

    Glivo you can buy incredibly strong glue these days mate I'm sure u could pick up something super strong from Bunnings maybe JB Weld makes a plastic glue, i would just glue all the pieces back together than add some more strength to the outside of the cracks by gluing on more plastic over that area, as u glue the cracks let the glue ooze out the crack than dremel or sand the excess glue down than glue a brace over both sides of the crack it will be stronger than new

  4. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Gosford
    Age
    58
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gazza2009au View Post
    Glivo you can buy incredibly strong glue these days mate I'm sure u could pick up something super strong from Bunnings maybe JB Weld makes a plastic glue, i would just glue all the pieces back together than add some more strength to the outside of the cracks by gluing on more plastic over that area, as u glue the cracks let the glue ooze out the crack than dremel or sand the excess glue down than glue a brace over both sides of the crack it will be stronger than new
    There was a little piece broken off the pivot spigot about a year or more ago. A sign of things to come I suppose. I tried JB Weld and Devcon Epoxy on it but the plastic is a very "oily" type and the glue just would not stick to it. Once it is in use there is a little bit of force goes into it with the the compression spring and I doubt it would hold together. It was never a really smooth wire feed in the first place so I wouldn't think it would stand up to being reassembled like a broken ceramic vase. Thanks for the suggestion but I doubt it will succeed.

    Not to worry. The old welder doesn't owe me anything really and I shouldn't complain about the use I've had from it. It paid for itself on the very first job I did with it and the reason I bought it. I used to own an EB Ford station wagon (I know ) with a 5 speed Borg Warner manual transmission. The clutch pedal / cable / return spring mechanism was too strong and it eventually ripped the mounting plate out of the firewall down behind the pedal. A guy quoted me over $1k to repair it way back then so I bought the welder, rented a bottle and fixed it myself for less and got to keep the welder at the end. I've done the same type of thing a few times now. Go out and buy the tools you need instead of paying somebody else to do the job and end up with nothing.

    Anyway, I bought a Migweld gas bottle today from the big B, (well I paid the $200 fully refundable deposit on the bottle and $99 for the gas). I'll set it up tomorrow running 0.6 mm solid wire with the roller wheel I have, as supplied with the generic drive and see if it works. If it doesn't then I have good reason to spend a little bit of money. I do have Wifey's horse float that needs a bit of repair so as long as I do that with a new welder all will be sweet. She has never begrudged me spending money on tools and machinery as she understands the economics of productivity.

    PS: I realized when I got home from Token Tools the other day that I'd left the broken wire feed up at his shop. I'm sure he's not chucked them yet but I doubt it is worth even trying to repair it.

  5. #50
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    987

    Default

    Mate nothing will stick to a oily surface thats just no preperation, you really need to degrease the plastic with acetone or spirits wipe it down 3 times over with cotton wool and cotton buds to get into the tight spots let it dry than use a good plastic glue i'm sure Selleys make something use that gorilla glue from bunnings the americans swear by it and have for decades

    I wouldnt give up on it just put some effort in to preperation

    That bit that is missing remould it out of card board and line it with baking paper so it peels off

  6. #51
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Gosford
    Age
    58
    Posts
    165

    Default

    The plastic isn't contaminated or dirty with oil or grease. The plastic has an oily / greasy nature to the material itself and appears to be resistant to adhesion. With the variety of plastics available there are many that are resistant to adhesion by different substances. This particular plastic did not take to being glued by epoxy. To be honest, if the replacement wire feed attempts don't work out, it's time to bite the bullet on a replacement welder.

  7. #52
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mackay North Qld
    Posts
    4,874

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by glivo View Post
    The plastic isn't contaminated or dirty with oil or grease. The plastic has an oily / greasy nature to the material itself and appears to be resistant to adhesion. .
    The oils in this plastic evaporate over time and the structure is left brittle and without strength.

    I had some no name hang on a bracket storage buckets. After several years the buckets being inside (Almost no use and NO SUN) have disintegrated under the minimal load in them.

    By contrast the same type - near indentical- storage buckets made here in OZ and twice as old still, function as new.
    Who knows, maybe the makers could have used good quality plastic in the W /feed frame with better longevity.

    Grahame

  8. #53
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Gosford
    Age
    58
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grahame Collins View Post
    The oils in this plastic evaporate over time and the structure is left brittle and without strength.

    I had some no name hang on a bracket storage buckets. After several years the buckets being inside (Almost no use and NO SUN) have disintegrated under the minimal load in them.
    Yet old Bakelite from the 1950's is often found intact and functional, albeit very ugly by today's standards.

    Quote Originally Posted by Grahame Collins View Post
    Who knows, maybe the makers could have used good quality plastic in the W /feed frame with better longevity.
    No doubt there was a material that would have done this but built in obsolescence is a business model. Companies don't want to sell products that will keep working for 50 years anymore. If the recent reading I've done (directed by RustyArc's comment in the welding section) is any indication, some companies are happy with a percentage of DOA products and hope most make it to the expiry of warranty period.

    This raises a point in relation to Australian Consumer Law. Many people incorrectly believe that if a 12 month manufacturers warranty has expired, they are no longer protected. Australian consumer law actually covers consumer goods for a period of time that is considered reasonable to expect for that item in relation to the cost and similar products, regardless of the stated manufacturers limited warranty. For example; in the case of a welding machine that cost $800 it may be reasonable to expect at least 5 years of use. Even if the manufacturers 12 month warranty has expired the consumer is able to seek repair or redress.
    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2011-06-...24?pfmredir=sm

    I have actually used this protection, with some difficulty and great perseverance mind you, in relation to a Television / DVD player combo that failed completely after being out of warranty for well over a year. The company State Manager tried to resist but once he knew I was familiar with the laws and the Small Claims Tribunal process the matter was resolved. The simple underlying fact was that after paying $600 (back then) for the TV, it was reasonable to expect it to last longer than 2 years, even though only having a manufacturer warranted period of 12 months.

    I don't know if anybody has tried that out on Rossi Welders or The sellers concerned.

  9. #54
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Gosford
    Age
    58
    Posts
    165

    Default Update on the 130 Twin

    Well at this stage I'm not too hopeful. I've been repeatedly interrupted in setting this up after installing the generic wire feed, but it doesn't look good at this point. A while back I measured the wire feed output at full speed with no welding contact. I timed a short burst and then multiplied the measured length to get a wire feed in m/min which I wrote on the front of the machine. At 10/10 it was feeding 13.2 meters per minute.

    I just repeated this with the new feed unit and it will only put out about 1.5 meters of wire per minute. If this unit is only feeding wire at 1/10 of the original I dare say it wont be much use for welding at higher power and it may not even work at all. I'll go back down and check if it changes when the 4 different power settings are selected as I only did 1 test and I didn't pay attention to the power setting so it may be not as bad as I think.

    Back to the shed I go.

    And it's a big NO NO NO. There is more to it than simply swapping the wire feed unit out. I should have seen it coming. The guy up at Token Tools did hint at it in saying that changing wire feed unit could involve re-designing the controlling circuit board to cater for different diameter rollers, but there is also the RPM of the motor to consider. The ratio relationships to all of the factors is obviously critical to the operation of the welder as a complete unit. The original wire feed had a very small diameter roller but rotated quite fast. The replacement unit has bigger diameter roller but obviously spins much slower and the wire feed rate to weld arc power is simply way out of sync. The feed rate is dependent on the power range setting, 1-Min, 1-Max, 2- Min and 2-Max and adjustable by the control dial from 1 - 10 as I should have expected. The problem is however, that the replacement generic wire feed unit is not pushing wire through at the same rate as the original, or even close. It is only pushing wire through at just over 1/3 of the speed required to match the weld arc power so it is always feeding way too slow. The wire is hitting and burning back repeatedly and simply depositing little balls on the weld metal surface. It is not possible to obtain sufficient wire feed with this feed unit and so the welder is DEAD.

    THE END

  10. #55
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Sydney, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    987

    Default

    Rossi welders are another one like my Mishto mig welder arnt they? buy and throw in bin the next day..... mine was a gas/gasless Mishto welder from ebay that had no reverse polarity that company is still around today i bet they high jacked many customers since

  11. #56
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mackay North Qld
    Posts
    4,874

    Default

    hi Glivo,
    I am sorry to hear that your mig welder cannot be fixed. However there is a bright side and that your next one will be a better one.
    For our part, we got to learn a few things that you discovered along the way,
    Thanks for posting it.

    I will move this to the Welding Forum as down the track a ways ,someone may be seeking similar info and your efforts may well save someone ,a bunch of time and effort.

    They will not think to search in metal work general for info on a mig welder.

    Grahame

  12. #57
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Gosford
    Age
    58
    Posts
    165

    Default


  13. #58
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Gosford
    Age
    58
    Posts
    165

    Default

    I thought I'd do a quick update on this thread just in case it helps somebody else. Too late for me as I gave my welder away to a guy who said he was going to have a go at gluing the wire feed unit back together even though I explained that the glues I'd already tried failed to adhere to it at all.

    However, apparently, even though Cigweld distributors and another place informed me that these wire feed units are no longer available, which was not their fault as it's a fact confirmed by Cigweld support when I spoke to them directly, I had the opportunity to speak to another local business last week and was informed that these are indeed still available and the guy said he probably had one on the shelf. The interesting thing is that Cigweld support also recently told me that I'd have to go to Sydney to find the nearest Cigweld repairer, however at a Tool shop Sale night last week the Cigweld ESAB and the Lincoln reps told me about this local guy who is an authorised Cigweld repairer just round the corner from me.

    Pretty disappointing really as I thought I'd been pretty thorough in investigating the possibility of fixing mine before finally giving up and buying a new machine. Other than the money, no regrets though. The 175i+ is a dream to use.

    I'll now try to contact the guy I gave it to and tell him the part may be available. I didn't actually see the part.

    Anyway, I'm on the Central Coast NSW but the business would probably mail out the part if required by somebody. PM me for business contact details if you need it.

Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst 1234

Similar Threads

  1. Wire feeder to suit a Cigweld 165 Turbo Mig Welder
    By Specialized29er in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 18th Apr 2018, 04:39 AM
  2. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 11th Sep 2012, 08:11 PM
  3. CIG Transmig 130 Twin
    By cliff.king in forum WELDING
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 6th Sep 2008, 05:50 PM
  4. Wire feed problems "need help"
    By Stufart in forum WELDING
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 14th Apr 2008, 07:44 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •