PDA

View Full Version : Knife handles



Old Croc
7th Jul 2019, 09:08 PM
Any knife makers on here? If so, what constitutes a good piece of wood for a handle? Does it need coarse or fine grain, light weight or heavy?
The reason I am asking is I am cleaning out 35 years of wood hoarding and I often think some of it would look real good on a knife, but I am usually wrong.
Rgds,
Crocy.

Briangoldcoast
8th Jul 2019, 09:38 AM
Hi Crocky,
while I'm no expert, I have made a few knives over the years and have a butter box full of short lengths of 'pretty' wood, I have collected over the years to make handles for knives "when I get the time".
From my reading over the years, and my experience , I would suggest that a hard fine grained wood, polishes best, and will often take a good shine with no more need oil or varnish. Desert Ironwood, Gidgee, and similar 'acacias' seem to stand up well.
Ive used Ringed Gidgee and it has a beautiful pattern. If you decide on using some of the desert ironwoods from North Queensland, be careful since some of the 'dust' can be poisonous. (ask me how i know)
On finishing---I use finer grained paper down to 1800 and 2000 and that usually gives a shiny finish that can easily be touched up after prolonged use.
If the handles get 'dirty', I wash them in warm soapy water and dry well, but for these sorts of knives that's not something that happens much.

I will probably be proved wrong, but that's my take on this.
regards
Brian

Grahame Collins
8th Jul 2019, 11:23 PM
Hi Crocy,

I have used Dead Finish on a few knives.

It was readily available around Emerald when I lived there.

It seemed a pretty tight grained tough timber that polished up well.

Grahame

wheelinround
10th Aug 2019, 10:51 AM
Looking at QMAC members knife making just about any timber with outstanding grain. Many are now stabalising in Cactis juice seems its become a standard required after centuries.
Burls to Red Cedar sizes viary but I've cut blocks for members 150x40x50 or as thin as 12mmx2 depends on size of knife being made.

mattm82
12th Aug 2019, 06:28 PM
As a full time maker best answer I can give is, it depends on the knife.
Stabilizing has opened up a huge variety of timbers that were previously ignored due to durability or stability.
I usually prefer highly figured Timberís but my last needed dark timber with as little grain activity as possible.
Sometimes I need heavier handles, sometimes lighter, to help appropriately balance out the blade.
If you wish, PM me and Iím happy to discuss in greater detail, and possibly give you some direction about what timbers may be suitable.

russ57
12th Aug 2019, 07:51 PM
The best bit for a given knife will be the piece you didn't keep....

Russ

wheelinround
18th Aug 2019, 10:23 AM
The best bit for a given knife will be the piece you didn't keep....

Russ[emoji1787][emoji1787][emoji1787][emoji1787] like every job

eskimo
24th Aug 2019, 10:25 AM
had'nt heard of stabilising wood before so googled it...interesting?

but for those who might try and use a glass container of some sort ...do not use a glass container NOT designed to be under a vacuum...you run the risk of it imploding...glass fragments flying every where

China
3rd Sep 2020, 01:35 AM
Lots of info re stabilising wood on WWF

lamestllama
5th Sep 2020, 12:07 AM
had'nt heard of stabilising wood before so googled it...interesting?

but for those who might try and use a glass container of some sort ...do not use a glass container NOT designed to be under a vacuum...you run the risk of it imploding...glass fragments flying every where

The resin they use is methyl methacrylate (MMA) when you polymerise it you get PMMA/acrylic/perspex/plexiglass. They don't use a normal catalyst but one that allows them to use heat to set it. There are a number of oxidants that are suitable such as benzoyl peroxide.

Rather than use cactus juice get one of the MMA's sold for sealing floors in food factories. It will cost you far less.

eskimo
10th Sep 2020, 07:29 PM
[QUOTE=lamestllama;1974148]The resin they use is methyl methacrylate (MMA) when you polymerise it you get PMMA/acrylic/perspex/plexiglass. They don't use a normal catalyst but one that allows them to use heat to set it. There are a number of oxidants that are suitable such as benzoyl peroxide

Rather than use cactus juice get one of the MMA's sold for sealing floors in food factories. It will cost you far less.[/QUOT

Have looked online and everthing I see is fleck or coloured stuff. Obviously I dont know what I am really needing to find...other thsn it needs to be clear or generally colourless.
Can you be a bit mor specific Eric?

polymerise..
Is that anything like like bashing a bit of veal for a schnitzel?