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Thread: Thread Chasers

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
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    Default Thread Chasers

    Another Newbie Question. I recently acquired a bunch of P&N thread chasers.
    P_N_Thread_Chaser_Int_6.jpg
    Was just wondering how these were held. Did they have a timber handle...thus hand held or were they held in some sort of tool holder. I checked an old P&N catalogue and they seemed to be sold as per the attached pic with no other options.
    Gaza

  2. #2
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    Default

    Gaza, I think you will find they are for woodturning, maybe that's why they have a tang. But I could be wrong.
    Rgds,
    Crocy.

  3. #3
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    Crocy is correct, they are a woodturning tool. It takes some practice to be able to use them correctly. As an indication of their use, would be for making screw lidded items, depending on the TPI, could also be used for making wooden clamp threads.
    HTH
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  4. #4
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    They were actually used on steel to give the threads the correct profile and further back they were used to cut threads from scratch. A lot of skill was required and is where the term 'drunken thread' came from.

    Phil

  5. #5
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    Richmond
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KBs PensNmore View Post
    Crocy is correct, they are a woodturning tool. It takes some practice to be able to use them correctly. As an indication of their use, would be for making screw lidded items, depending on the TPI, could also be used for making wooden clamp threads.
    HTH
    Kryn
    Used extensively in Railway workshops during steam days for repairing threads on brass, steel and cast iron components eg water injector component threads during refurb. Used in conjunction with a rest similar to wood turning rest.

    Old stock may be still floating around from Railway stores which could be carbon steel so "slow" surface speed is is the word.

  6. #6
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    Yes, as others have said, used like a wood turning tool. The trick is to feed them at exactly the right rate so that the pitch spacing is correct. I have a couple myself but am not game to use them.
    The one you have pictured is for internal threads. External thread versions look a bit like a dinner fork.

    Michael

  7. #7
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    Mar 2019
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    Default

    Thanks guys.....yes I knew they were for metal and how to tell the difference between internal and external chasers....I was more concerned about whether they had wooden handles or not...the tang indicates that may have been the case but I have never seen one with a handle and the P&N catalogue doesnít offer a handle as an option. So was thinking there may have been some other holding mechanism. The catalogue that I have is from the early 60ís. And referred to them as hand thread repairers rather than cutters....I would imagine the courser versions would indeed be excellent for cutting wooden threads.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    melbourne australia
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