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  1. #16
    BobL is offline Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Quote Originally Posted by snapatap View Post
    Breathing coolant mist is really bad for your health, i wouldn't allow a mist system at the shop I work at. Mist collectors are slowly becoming more common on machining centers to combat poor shop air quality. On the last Machinist therapy hotline podcast they spoke about shop air quality, and a couple of the hosts have throat problems that clear up after a few days away from the shop.
    There are many things in metal shops that are unhealthy but untangling these from domestic and other factors have only become possible in recent times. Plain old dust was recently raised from the 8th leading cause of death in the world to the 5th leading cause of death. Most people think of the dangers of dust in terms of "lungs" but it is now established that dust contributes significantly to coronary diseases, strokes. and other diseases.

  2. #17
    elanjacobs is offline Apprentice gear maker and machine doctor
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    Quote Originally Posted by snapatap View Post
    Breathing coolant mist is really bad for your health, i wouldn't allow a mist system at the shop I work at. Mist collectors are slowly becoming more common on machining centers to combat poor shop air quality. On the last Machinist therapy hotline podcast they spoke about shop air quality, and a couple of the hosts have throat problems that clear up after a few days away from the shop.
    Air quality is one of the main reasons I had to leave the timber industry, that's why I wanted to find out how controllable the mist systems are. I had a couple of days on the cylindrical grinder last year and was glad I kept my powered mask; there is a fume hood, but it doesn't get everything and in a small closed room (gotta be climate controlled) the smell was really noticeable.

    I've had a generous offer of a loan of a Minicool, so I'll be able to see how it performs before making a decision.

  3. #18
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    I inspected parts in an aerospace machining plant for 27 years. Even though I never actually worked at the machines I was close enough to be breathing the mist from the coolant. Some operations were with misters and much was flood coolant. They blew the parts and tables off with shop air with up to 1/2" nozzles and much of that was atomized. The big mill was 190' long and 11' wide with 4 gantries with 2 or 3 heads each to give you an idea of how much was thrown into the air. The coolant turned the metal foil backed insulation on the walls brown in a few years and everything was coated with a sticky residue. There was an operator (about 58 years old and worked there 20+ years) that went on compensation to eventually get pensioned off because of lung damage. I feel I have some respiratory damage from the coolant too but not enough that it will kill me. Just help it along a little. I won't use a mister in my home shop but would use a cold jet of shop air for the appropriate work. I use a respirator when squirting coolant/lubricant when turning or milling. Don't let anyone tell you that a water based coolant can't hurt you. Enclosed machines with mist buster/condensers if properly designed and maintained can help but you still need good ventilation too.

    Pete

  4. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by QC Inspector View Post
    I won't use a mister in my home shop but would use a cold jet of shop air for the appropriate work.
    How about a mister with just water then? You'll get much more cooling action with a lot less air. Especially good for plastics.
    Chris

  5. #20
    BobL is offline Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Quote Originally Posted by jack620 View Post
    How about a mister with just water then? You'll get much more cooling action with a lot less air. Especially good for plastics.
    Rust?

    A $20 bathroom fan and a length of aluminised coated plastic ducting like this from bunnings should go a long way to solving this problem.
    Screen Shot 2019-06-15 at 7.49.58 am.png

  6. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    Rust?
    On plastic?
    Chris

  7. #22
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    Actually I have a surplus inline ducted fan that I might press into action as Bob suggests. I'm actually more concerned about the acrid smoke that I get when making heavy cuts in steel with cutting oil.
    Chris

  8. #23
    BobL is offline Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Quote Originally Posted by jack620 View Post
    On plastic?
    No - your mill/lathe

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