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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Whitby, UK
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    Default Stainless steel (316) rectangular tubing required - please help

    I am looking for some 316 st st tube 100mm x 75mm with 3mm wall. Someone has just informed me I should be able to purchase this with radius corners. I could do with the radius about the same as a florin.

    Any ideas

    Thanks

    Mike

  2. #2
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    Jun 2011
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    Australia east coast
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikex View Post
    I am looking for some 316 st st tube 100mm x 75mm with 3mm wall. Someone has just informed me I should be able to purchase this with radius corners. I could do with the radius about the same as a florin.

    Any ideas

    Thanks

    Mike
    Out here I'd try Prochem. Where you are - NFI. Try a supplier to the oil/chemical industry as they carry a lot of stainless tube, pipe etc.

    PDW

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2011
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    Albury
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    8

    Default

    I worked in scrap metal for 6 years in Australia and never saw a square section of 316 in that time, only flat sheet and pipe. Is there any chance that 316 might be used on the North Sea oil rigs? Most square section SS gets used in the food industry where the requirement is only for 304. If you do happen to find a supplier take all your arms and legs with you 'cause I'm sure that's the currency they'll be charging in! Good luck.

  4. #4
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    Jun 2007
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    just not the size you want and it is in Australia...
    https://www.archermetals.com.au/stai...l-tube/square/

  5. #5
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    Oct 2007
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    Alexandra Vic
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    Default

    I used to work in the metal furniture game and we did a fair bit of 316 stainless work for outdoor tables, benches and chairs. There were a variety of sources for 316 into Australian wholesalers, some local, some via China, and some via Swedish mills. The Chinese had relatively large radius corners, around 10mm, the local around 5-6mm, and the Swedish about 3mm, in the general size range you are interested in. However we never came across a 100x75 section that I can recall. The size chart liked above seems to be about all that we could access 15 years ago.

    Sorry that can't give you more positive news.
    I used to be an engineer, I'm not an engineer any more, but on the really good days I can remember when I was.

  6. #6
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    Apr 2012
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    Whitby, UK
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    Default

    Thanks for all your replies. I very much doubted it would be available, especially with radiused corners. The situation is I have a yacht with a wooden boom size 100 x 75mm and on each end there are capping pieces about 100mm long in 316 stainless with nicely radiused (can someone tell me how to spell radiused!) corners. They have obviously been specially made. I want to replace one of the capping pieces with a longer capping piece of around 300mm.

    Mike

  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by aldav View Post
    I worked in scrap metal for 6 years in Australia and never saw a square section of 316 in that time, only flat sheet and pipe.
    As I said, Prochem carries it. I know this for a fact because I've bought 50 x 50 x 3 off of them in Tasmania. They have other sizes. No idea about 100 x 75 though.

    PDW

  8. #8
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    jilliby nsw
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    Default

    Maybe a folded sheet to form your cross section by a sheetmetal fabricator, just an idea if your really stuck sourcing material

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by hpa1 View Post
    Maybe a folded sheet to form your cross section by a sheetmetal fabricator, just an idea if your really stuck sourcing material
    This is what I'd do on the odd occassion that an odd size required, get it folded as a channel then weld it or get it welded by the place that folds it. Would be a lot easier/cheaper in the long run and you'd get the radii that you want too.
    HTH
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  10. #10
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    Apr 2012
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    Whitby, UK
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    Default

    IMG_9649.jpg

    The capping piece is at the top of the photo. I just need to have a longer one made. I guess you will be able to ZOOM the image.

    Mike

  11. #11
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    Sep 2012
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    North Yorkshire UK
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    Default

    Hello Mike,

    These people can do what you want, won't be cheap though !
    A plus is that they are in Bradford, close enough for you to visit them.

    https://www.fabricateuk.com/



    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  12. #12
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    Jun 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikex View Post
    IMG_9649.jpg

    The capping piece is at the top of the photo. I just need to have a longer one made. I guess you will be able to ZOOM the image.

    Mike
    Custom job for sure, head to a good fab shop.

    Likely be a lot cheaper if you do the polishing yourself. When I make stuff for people (usually boat bits) I tell them up front that I don't do polishing, a flap wheel finish is my limit. I painted all the stainless steel on my sailboat.

    PDW

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Whitby, UK
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    Default

    Thanks for replies,

    The reason for wanting a longer length of stainless capping is that the wood is getting a bit soft and if I had a longer capping the soft wood could be buried inside the longer cap having given it a good soak in preservative. Fit the new cap properly sealed with sikoflex and it will last me out.

    Alternately buy a new boom.

    Comes down to a question of the price difference between a new cap and a new boom.

    Mike

  14. #14
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    Oct 2007
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    Alexandra Vic
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    Default

    The cap fitting shown is either a custom fabrication for the boat, or a commercial fitting that was made as a fabrication. Best approach would be to have a fab shop that has a brake press fold some sheet into channel (U section) to your required dimensions, then weld two channels together, dress and weld in the end plate, then polish. Advantage of this approach is that tooling costs are minimal if the shop has a reasonable set of tooling to start with. To get the required corner radius, they can fab up a basic upper tool by welding a length of round bar of the appropriate radius along the edge of a section of flat bar. Not suitable for volume production, but it will work for 4 folds (2 pieces of channel with 2 folds each).

    RHS sections are formed by a continuous rolling system where coiled flat stock of the appropriate width passes through many pairs of shaped rollers, with each pair adding a little more to the shape of the section. The result is a section with an open seam on one surface, which is welded by an automatic welder at the end of the chain of rolls. A complete set of forming rolls could be worth up to 50,000 pounds in the size you are interested in, so a particular mill is unlikely to offer a variety of different corner radius' for each given section size. However, as I alluded to in a previous post, different mills produce materials with different corner radius, but none that I know of produce anything approaching the section you require, hence the suggestion to have it fabricated from a pair of custom folded channels. If you chose to go this route, I would suggest having an extra set of channels folded while the machine is set up, just in case you need to approach the other end of the boom in a similar fashion later on. A lot of the cost of forming the channel would be in preparing the custom upper tool if needed, setting up the press, and pulling some sample folds to calibrate the system. The actual forming of the channel once everything is set up and calibrated is fairly simple and inexpensive, and for 10 minutes of machine time plus the material used, would represent good value in comparison to having to repeat the setup time and calibration for another set in a few years time.
    I used to be an engineer, I'm not an engineer any more, but on the really good days I can remember when I was.

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