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  1. #1
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    Default Old cutting torch and tips

    Hi all.
    I have a older CIG cutting torch (mixer) which takes "Type 37" tips. I have a selection of these tips, but the numbers on them are not related to anything I know.... E.g. Number 0 is quite large (looks like a number 15 in Type 41 - the common current system). There is als a Nmber 4, a Number 7 and a couple with numbers like 45-12....
    I can't find anything about Type 37 tips anywhere on the net....
    Anyone have any of those and know what the numbers mean?
    Or can I just measure the oxy hole in the middle and compare those with the current types?
    Cheers, Joe
    again completely retired - more time to contemplate projects and spend more shed time....

  2. #2
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    Hi Joe,
    I remember those threaded nozzles before the type 41.

    They only took a small ding in the seat and sods would backfire like mad. I was glad to see the end of them. The trade was phasing them out in the seventies before I began teaching.

    I have just lately dumped a load of ancient CIG brochures left over from my packrat teaching days. The brochures probably had that very information

    Do you want to upgrade as I have a type 41 cutting head and some nozzles around the place and will eventually find as I clean up and throw stuff out? Its yours for the postage,if you want it.

    Grahame

  3. #3
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    Default

    Hi Joe,
    This morning ,I pulled out my copy of 1982 TAFE Metal fabrication apprentice notes. It doesn't have photos just sketches.
    Even those sketches show the type 41 cutting nozzles.

    I can still visualise the nozzle though as it had 2 flats cut in the shank and a nut which moved the "adjustable tapered seat.

    Sorry but I am unable to remember the designation s on the shank or what they meant.

    Grahame

  4. #4
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    Default

    Thanks for the effort and trouble you went to, Grahame!
    You described the old tips exactly.
    I do have a cutting torch for Type 41 tips - so thank you for the offer.
    I just wanted to know how to identify the old type of tips for the old mixer.... The tips I have for it are all unused.... and I find it hard to turf good stuff out
    Cheers, Joe
    again completely retired - more time to contemplate projects and spend more shed time....

  5. #5
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    Dec 2005
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    South Australia
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    Default

    As Graham said they ar a PIA put them in a nice frame and hang them on the wall

  6. #6
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    Default

    Thanks for the input everyone.
    Well, as it happened, this afternoon I did a bit of cutting - or rather demonstrated, then instructed my 10 y.o. grandson to do some cutting. We were making him an anvil from some heavy rail I bought a few weeks ago. We managed to cut through the bottom flange with my only Type 41 tip - #8. We then had a look at the Typ 37 tips and picked a bigger one for the top and vertical. It worked fine and messy - and he had a great time, mesmerised by the amount of flame, sparks and "lava flow" he produced.
    The result was OK and will receive a fair bit of grinding - as I expected. Any fear if flying sparks and dripping molten metal is gone for him now anyway (he was well protected by all the PPE I could muster, as you can imagine).
    But I think I might get a couple of larger Type 41 tips (12 & 15) and put the Type 37 gear to other uses that may benefit from brass and copper components....
    Cheers, Joe
    again completely retired - more time to contemplate projects and spend more shed time....

  7. #7
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    Default

    Hi Joe,

    Permit me to jump in and add the following in the hope it helps you or other members.

    Using #12 & 15 Cutting Nozzles on the railway iron will certainly benefit.
    Here are some additional techniques you may like to try to make any subsequent cuts even better.

    1. Oxy Cutting pressure - with nozzle lighted and brought to neutral flame pull the cutting stream lever and adjust the length of the cutting stream by increasing/decreasing the delivered pressure.When the cutting stream is at its longest that is the optimium setting for that particular nozzle.

    The neutral flame balance will likely require adjustment before a cut is commenced. A neutral flame is identified as the oxidizing flame, as adjusted from the pointed perheat flame tips, to, just as they transition to the neutral condition with rounded tips of the preheat flames.

    2. When the cut is started the cutting lever is pulled down -all of the way down - it is used on or off - no in-betweens.

    3. The neutral flame is positioned at a millimeter or two above the cutting surface at the start and during the cut.

    4.A thorough warm up of the piece is recommended to further enhance the quality of the cut. Make it too hot to touch.

    5.Correct cutting speed is signaled by the tearing /farting sound and the jet slag stream emerging from the base of the cut at about 15 degrees off vertical in the cut direction.

    6. Cleaning wires-ugh!- put them aside and try the set of cleaning drills. Nozzles cut wonderfully when cleaned but cut terribly when reamed to a football-shaped orifice by the cleaning wires. Wire cleaning has wrecked countless cutting nozzles.

    Can we see some pics when you have finished,please?

    Grahame

  8. #8
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    If you really want to find out the cutting tip size/capacity then try trawling the American websites. They still number tips as 0, 00, 1 etc.

  9. #9
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    Thanks Kark and Grahame.
    All useful tips. Particularly the optimum Oxygen pressure tip!
    I'll post some photos here when the Anvil is finished.
    Cheers, Joe
    again completely retired - more time to contemplate projects and spend more shed time....

  10. #10
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    What I forgot to mention was the necessity to check/clean the cutting oxygen orifice before trying to set the cutting jet stream pressure.

    If the nozzle orifice is dirty you will not be able to get the long oxygen jet stream necessary for a clean smooth cut.

    I used the cleaning drills over the wires as it is possible with wires -over time -to ream the hole out of round thereby buggering up the nozzle.

    The pressure set technique was shown to me by an old-timer. I have never seen it written in a text anywhere.

    Given the use of a clean plate, preheat, correct travel speed, correct preheat and pressure settings on 25mm plus steel, the surface finish could often approach that of a profile machine cut. The indicative signals that the cut was Ok was the tearing farting sound and the 15 degree or so spray of slag in the cut forward direction.

    When using the cutting torch freehand it was possible to consistently split the center pops on a marked straight line cut.

    Below is a pic of the drills.

    Grahame


    Cigweld cleaning drills.JPG.png

  11. #11
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    Oct 2008
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    Cairns, Q
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jhovel View Post
    Anyone have any of those and know what the numbers mean?
    Hi Joe, My I add some further confusion to the discussion? I attach two tables from old undated copies of CIG's booklets "Hints on Oxy Acetylene Welding and Cutting" undated, probably fifties or earlier, and "Hints on Gas Welding and Cutting" which came with my Colt 22 set about 1976, also undated.

    Table 1 from the earlier booklet gives the particulars for cutting tips numbered 0 to 6 with the hole sizes and number drill sizes. Table 2 from the second booklet gives the corresponding numbers in the earlier series starting with 00, 0, 1, 2, 3 etc and the present tip numbering system, with the cleaning drill numbers and the number drill series numbers for the hole sizes, but with no mention of the earlier 0-6 series, so it would appear that in relatively recent times there have been three different tip series numbers in use. It looks as though you might have a mixture of two of those in your collection. The three tables give enough information to give a direct comparison between the tip size numbers in the various systems.

    By the way, years ago I did a course on thermit welding of railway rails in situ, and FWIW they recommended using a no. 15 tip for cutting the rail ends square before welding.


    Frank.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  12. #12
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    Default

    Thanks a lot for those tables! That is indeed interesting information to keep.
    Cheers, Joe
    again completely retired - more time to contemplate projects and spend more shed time....

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