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  1. #1
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    Default Air compressors - a comparison table of 16 models of 3hp 15A types on the market

    I've made a comparison of quite a few of the 3 horsepower portable air compressors on the market. Basically, I wanted to compare the compressors you can use on a 15A single-phase circuit.

    Whaddya want it for? Everything, of course. Sandblasting, spraypainting, air tools. I want it all. Who doesn't? Yeah, not inflating truck tires, so all the models I looked at have single stage pumps. While I may have to pause during jobs to keep below the duty cycle and not overheat the compressor head, which I can accept, basically I want the most air at a decent pressure that I can get on a 15A plug. Given that the price difference between el cheapo and recognised manufacturers is about $400 (a range from $1100 to $1500 for this size compressor), looking on average at a budget of $1300 to $1400 seems like a good place to start. For spending less, maybe rather than going el cheapo 15A, maybe you'd instead go down to the 10A compressors. Some of these like the Pilot K17SD are definitely worth looking at. But if you've got a 15A supply, it seems to me you might as well get the budget together for just that bit extra capacity, for things like sandblasting and spray painting large jobs (cars) where you want to spray in longer bursts to help avoid flash-off problems on your lacquer. For sure these 15A 3hp compressors, even with a 100L tank, won't give you 20hp 500L compressor nirvana, but for a single-phase shed setup it's the best you're gonna get.

    Below is the Excel table I made from crawling the web, looking at specs and photos and talking to the odd sales rep. As a result of the comparison, at this stage I'm leaning toward the Pilot compressors, either the TM series using the Fiac compressor pumps from Italy (higher FAD, lower duty cycle) or the K series using the venerable Chinook pumps also from Italy (higher duty cycle, lower FAD). Or else one of the models that use the Taiwanese-made Fusheng pump, also venerable and built like a Soviet tank. A Taiwanese Puma pump could be ok too. I'm less keen on the ones using the Chinese N75 and various totally nondescript generic type pumps, but they do come in at a tempting low price. There's probably others out there in this category, but I had to stop somewhere. So this is the list.

    So if you've got a 3hp air compressor, what's your opinion? Tell me what I should look at.

    Air Compressors - portable 3hp 240V 15A single-stage reciprocating piston types compared
    Last update: 12 July 2018

    Brand Pilotair Pilotair Pilotair Airmac Airmac Pulford Puma Peerless Westair Lincoln Hafco McMillan SP Tools SP Tools Ferrua IronAir
    Model TM420SDi TM420SDL K17/15L T17 T20 T300S1 P20 P17 WE18/54 L17 Super 16 C16 SP17 SP18 B3800150CM3 LB1890S3
    Drive type V-belt V-belt V-belt Dual V-belt Dual V-belt V-belt V-belt V-belt V-belt single V-belt V-belt V-belt V-belt V-belt V-belt V-belt
    Pump material cast iron, alloy head cast iron, alloy head cast iron, alloy head cast iron cast iron cast iron cast iron cast iron cast iron cast iron cast iron cast iron cast iron cast iron cast iron, alloy head cast iron
    Pump displacement 14.6 cfm / 416 lpm 14.6 cfm / 416 lpm 14.8 / 419 lpm 13.8 cfm / 390 lpm 16.5 cfm / 468 lpm 16.5 cfm / 468 lpm 14.8 cfm / 420 lpm - 15.1 cfm / 427 lpm 345 lpm 16 cfm / 453 lpm 16 cfm / 453 lpm - - 13.8 cfm / 390 lpm -
    Free Air Delivery 11.9 cfm / 339 lpm 11.9 cfm / 339 lpm 9.8 / 279 lpm 9.9 cfm / 280 lpm 10.8 cfm / 305 lpm 10.8 cfm / 306 lpm 11.3 cfm / 320 lpm 320 lpm @100psi 11.3 cfm / 320 lpm 320 lpm 11.6 cfm / 328 lpm 11.6 cfm / 328 lpm 275 lpm 309 lpm - 11.3 cfm / 320 lpm
    FAD testing standard AS4637 AS4637 AS4637 AS4637 AS4637 AS4637 AS4637 100 psi - 100 psi - - - - - -
    Pump type 2 cyl inline Fiac 2 cyl inline Fiac 2 cyl inline Chinook K17 3 cyl Fusheng TA-65 3 cyl Fusheng TA-65 3 cyl Fusheng TA-65 3 cyl Puma PG30 2 cyl inline 'N75' 2 cyl inline 'N75' 2 cyl inline 'N75' 3 cyl 'C16' generic W 3 cyl 'C16' generic W 2 cyl, generic V 3 cyl, generic W 2 cyl Nuair B3800 3 cyl, generic W
    Pump speed - - 1100 rpm 815 rpm 990 rpm 980 rpm 880 rpm 963 rpm - 963 rpm - - - - 1100 rpm -
    Max. Pressure 1000 kPa / 145 psi 1000 kPa / 145 psi 1000 kPa / 145 psi 1000 kPa / 145 psi 1000 kPa / 145 psi 950 kPa 900 kPa / 130 psi 1000 kPa / 145 psi 827 kPa / 120 psi 1000 kPa / 145 psi 827 kPa / 120 psi 115 psi 1034 kPa /150 psi 1034 kPa / 150 psi 145 psi -
    Receiver tank 50 L 100 L 100 L 70 L 100 L 100 L 75 L 55 L 54 L 54 L 60 L 58 L 50 L 60 L 150 L 90 L
    Motor 2.2kW / 3hp Teco 2.2kW / 3hp Teco 2.25 kW / 3.0 hp Teco 2.2kW / 3.0hp Teco 2.4kW / 3.2hp Teco 2.4 kW 2.4kW / 3.2hp 2.4kW / 3.2hp 2.2kW / 3hp 3.2 hp 2.25kW / 3hp 3 hp Teco 2.23kW / 3.0hp 2.23kW / 3.0hp 2.2 kW / 3 hp 2.23kW / 3.0hp
    Filter regulator no no no yes yes - yes ET-250 yes yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
    Pressure switch NEMA (Italian) NEMA (Italian) NEMA (Italian) Condor Condor Condor MDR4 yes yes Condor yes yes yes yes yes yes yes
    Size L x W x H (mm) 990 x 400 x 740 1150 x 490 x 890 1100 x 490 x 920 1080 x 410 x 780 1060 x 430 x 820 1165 x 388 x 980 1130 x 450 x 790 1050 x 430 x 770 940 x 430 x 840 1090 x 450 x 780 1000 x 400 x 740 1200 x 600 x 900 - - 770 x 340 x 670 1055 x 440 x 1102
    Weight 80 kg 90 kg 90 kg 90 kg 102 kg 120 kg 103 kg 85 kg 80 kg 79 kg 84 kg 95 kg - - 44kg -
    Noise level - - 75 dB 77 dB 79 dB - 75 dB - 75 dB - - - - 97 dB -
    Origin Italy Australia Italy / Aust Taiwan Taiwan Taiwan? Taiwan China China? China China China / Australia China? China? Italy / China? China?
    Warranty 3 yr pump, 1 yr else 3 yr pump, 1 yr else 3 yr pump, 1 yr else 2 yr pump 1 yr motor 2 yr pump 1 yr motor - 1 yr pump/motor 5 yr pump 1 yr motor 3 yr pump 1 yr motor 5 yr pump 1 yr 3 yr pump 1 yr motor 1 yr (3yr pump?) 1 yr (3yr pump?) 1 yr 2yr pump 1 yr motor
    Price (inc gst) $1,210 $1,386 $1,388 $1,399 $1,549 - $1,349 $1,399 - $1,149 $1,089 $1,195 $1,160 $1,350 $1,099 $899
    Price source Hafco Hafco Hafco Glenco Glenco Pulford Glenco Gasweld Westair Sydney Tools Hafco Ublast Austech Ind. Austech Ind. Sydney Tools Total Tools
    Table notes:
    1. FAD is supposed to be quoted according to AS 4637—2006 Measurement of pump displacement and free air delivery of a reciprocating air compressor package), i.e. test gauge pressure is in range 600-800kPa. This is noted where known, but not all compressors necessarily use this standard.
    2. Peerless P17 is a rebranded JY air compressor model P17, made by Taixing Jing Yuan Industry Trade Co. (China).
    3. Westair WE18/54 uses a N75 compressor pump probably from Taixing Jing Yuan Industry Trade Co. (China), seems very similar overall to Peerless P17. Lincoln L17 also from same source, says it uses JY Co's C5 pump but photo shows a JY N75 pump.
    4. Hafco Super16 is a rebranded McMillan C16.
    5. Pilot Air K and TM series tanks have extra ports that are useful for linking an extra receiver or powering a plumbed workshop air piping system (like this: http://www.farmingahead.com.au/wp-co...f9df9f.pdf.pdf). Some other brands may have an extra port, but Chinese cheapies are not likely to.


    [PS: To import this Excel table to BB code, I used the online copy-paste table converter at https://theenemy.dk/table/ -- it took a bit of web hunting to find a way to do it]

  2. #2
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Good work in putting this table together

    A Couple of comments.

    An FAD of 11.9 cfm is getting close to a theoretical maximum for a 3HP motor so I wonder about compressors that claim this FAD.
    FADs are all supposed to be done to an Australian standard but the test is still performed by the manufacturer and there's no one running around policing this. The first thing my BIL boiler maker does when he gets a compressor is test it out and if it doesn't meet their spec he sends it back.
    For a 3HP motor I'd be much more likely to believe numbers between 10.5 and 11.5.

    An interesting comparison is the FAD versus pump displacement and motor HP. This shows that having a bigger pump makes no difference if you only use a 3HP motor or even a so-called 3.2HP. The 3.2HP rating for a motor may be bit of long straw. Most half decent 3 HP motors can generate 3.2HP for a long enough load such as is required to recycle a compressor. A 3HP motor could easily generate 4HP but it won't do it for very many cycles.

    Country of "origin" is not very helpful. Some so called Australian compressors are made from parts sourced elsewhere usually in china. Same in Europe. Italian compressors are often made from parts made in Bulgaria and other eastern European countries. Not that there may be anything wrong with them - they are just not being completely honest.

    Pressure switch = "yes" is kinda meaningless.

  3. #3
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    Thanks Bob

    Some things to consider for interpreting the data are that you can run a pump harder and get more air delivery by increasing rpm, simply by reducing its pulley size. That might make the pump more prone to overheating. It's hard to get pump rpm data though, especially for the cheaper compressors. Also different pumps are going to have a different optimal rpm and absolutely none of these pumps have power vs delivery curves in their sales literature, whereby you could see if you're getting an overclocked pump or not. You see this comparing the Airmac T17 and T20, same pump, same motor power, but the T20 runs faster and gets a higher FAD.

    Some things are mysteries to me - you might have a better idea - just looking at the displacement and FAD on the Pilot TM and K series - same motor, but the TM's Fiac pump is giving more FAD than the K's Chinook pump. Same manufacture ('assembler') so presumably same testing method. What's the trade off? Sales literature suggests its the duty cycle. But possibly part of it is pump efficiency. In the exaple just given, the no-load pump displacement is almost identical. So is the difference between the Fiac and the Chinook in FAD at pressure due to efficiency, or harder running?

    For the row of FAD specs, I noticed that with the Peerless compressor for example, the FAD specs are lifted directly from the Chinese manufacturer's website - although in their case they state it as at 100 psi. The other Chinese types sold here, who knows what FAD testing standard was applied - but presumably they are figures off whatever blurb the importer gets from the Chinese manufacturer. The ones that say their figures are tested to AS 4637, I have noted. Still, as you say, it's not independently certified.

    It is hard to put details of country of origin into a table cell 20 characters long. Really my purpose was to note which ones seems to be fully imported from China, and which might have Australian assembly/componentry (such as receiver tank), or have Italian parts (or at least Italian quality control in Chinese factory). It's not an endorsement of e.g. "all Italian pumps are better" or anything like that.

    Those cells that have 'yes' in them are placeholders - but note that Pilot Air have 'no' for filter regulator - they don't include one, its an added expense, which is meaningful. For pressure switch, some brands do specify their brand of pressure switch, the others don't - for the latter, they may as well be 'yes' brand from China, for all we know.

  4. #4
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnaduit View Post
    Some things to consider for interpreting the data are that you can run a pump harder and get more air delivery by increasing rpm, simply by reducing its pulley size. That might make the pump more prone to overheating.
    Yep - good point - it may also only be a small amount of overheating but long term it will affects pump life. Remember they only have get past teh warranty period. Maybe correlates with the 5 year warranty?

    Some things are mysteries to me - you might have a better idea - just looking at the displacement and FAD on the Pilot TM and K series - same motor, but the TM's Fiac pump is giving more FAD than the K's Chinook pump. Same manufacture ('assembler') so presumably same testing method. What's the trade off? Sales literature suggests its the duty cycle. But possibly part of it is pump efficiency. In the exaple just given, the no-load pump displacement is almost identical. So is the difference between the Fiac and the Chinook in FAD at pressure due to efficiency, or harder running?
    A significant part of compressor efficiency is how well the compressor is cooled. All sorts of things come into play here. Geometry, fan size, flow rate, fin size, orientation etc. My V4 2 stage 4HP Clisby has no fan on the compressor, well the large pulley spokes on the compressor have a minimal degree of flattening and angling that directs a small amount of air onto the cylinders but thats it. The cylinder fins themselves aren't that long either but it seems to work and stay cool probably because of the V4 geometry.

    For the row of FAD specs, I noticed that with the Peerless compressor for example, the FAD specs are lifted directly from the Chinese manufacturer's website - although in their case they state it as at 100 psi. The other Chinese types sold here, who knows what FAD testing standard was applied - but presumably they are figures off whatever blurb the importer gets from the Chinese manufacturer. The ones that say their figures are tested to AS 4637, I have noted. Still, as you say, it's not independently certified.
    Yep treat with evap sea salt size grains.

    It is hard to put details of country of origin into a table cell 20 characters long. Really my purpose was to note which ones seems to be fully imported from China, and which might have Australian assembly/componentry (such as receiver tank), or have Italian parts (or at least Italian quality control in Chinese factory). It's not an endorsement of e.g. "all Italian pumps are better" or anything like that.
    I hav an Italian cousin who owns as electric motor factory in north Italy. Most are 3P VFD type motors and some are tweaked into custom motors. He makes some parts himself but also sources some parts from eastern Europe and had a devil of a time getting quality control. It's taken him many visits to these eastern European factories to get things right but he says it seems to be working as his recalls have dropped right off in the last couple of years.

    To a certain extent it depends on what you do with your compressor. I had great plans with air tools, spray painting, plasma cutting etc but honestly they're once a week if that type operation other wise the most common use is just blowing crap off things. My $199 special 2.5 HP from bunnings was treated like shyte and I never changed the oil in it for ~10 Years. I just topped the oil up every few years. Nothing I seemed to do would kill it - eventually the plastic fan became disconnected from the motor and it overheated and turned itself off. I fixed that and soon after found it was compressing less and less air and on opening it up I discovered the Al reed valves on it had cracked. One beer can later it was running like a champ. I then gave it to my son and bought the Clisby but I have to say I rarely use the capacity provided by the bigger compressor.

    BTW I have my 4HP V4 Clisby on a single 15A circuit with a 20A breaker and cable. I have a V/I meter on the compressor control box and the only time it goes over 15A (15.2/15.4A) is in the last 5psi compression of its cycle. If I dropped the max PSI (130) by 7psi it would not go over 15A. Continuous running at 100 psi draws -13.5A so none of this really strains the electricals. I would not suggesting doing this without using a V/I meter.

  5. #5
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    That size compressor is fine for painting but if are planning on doing any serious sandblasting, then it's not going to be much good. Those smaller compressors would be able to cope with blasting very small items in a cabinet but anything larger than a 50 cent piece you will need some serious air , like 50 cfm or more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by morrisman View Post
    That size compressor is fine for painting but if are planning on doing any serious sandblasting, then it's not going to be much good. Those smaller compressors would be able to cope with blasting very small items in a cabinet but anything larger than a 50 cent piece you will need some serious air , like 50 cfm or more.
    I made a note here when I was talking to a Hafco sales rep that their smallest sandblasting gun needed 310 lpm. That's about what these 3hp compressors deliver. I should have asked which gun that was. But anyway it matches what you say - it's not going to do a car, but should be alright for machine parts.

  7. #7
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    I am VERY skeptical about air tool manufacturer air flow specs - I have started to double the number provided and find that it usually closer to reality than the number they provide.

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    I've been digging into the compressor pumps on these machines, just to see what kind of parts diagrams and parts availability exist. It's a relatively expensive machine for a home workshop, so it's nice to know if it's fully serviceable and repairable. And anyway if you have a mechanical turn of mind then having a machine you can easily get parts for, especially if from multiple sources, is more satisfying than buying something where 'you're on your own'.

    There's really only two machines in this range that fully satisfy that criterion: The Fusheng TA-65 and the Chinook K17. Parts for these are available from multiple suppliers in the US, UK and elsewhere. For other pumps, like the Fiac, Puma and perhaps others, the Australian distributor probably has spares, but it's just the Fusheng and Chinook that seem to have widespread availability.

    For the Chinook, there's these resources:

    Chinook Pump Service Manual: https://www.surpluscenter.com/_MoreSpecs/i4-1470.pdf
    Chinook Compressor Pump Breakdown Diagrams: https://www.fps-compressors.co.uk/pd...k_pumps_bd.pdf
    Online parts here: https://mastertoolrepair.com/air-com...-k17-p-39.html
    Pilot Air have parts as well.

    For the Fusheng, there's these:
    Fusheng TA-65 Pump parts diagram: http://www.airtekltd.com/parts/TA65.pdf
    Fusheng A Series Air compressor Catalogue: http://www.fusheng.com/upload/Produc...12A000-E1).pdf
    For parts, you are reliant on the Australian distributor: http://www.mcmillanair.com.au/product_series/fu-sheng/

    For the Fiac, as far as it goes, there's these:
    Fiac air compressor catalogue: http://www.fiac.it/wwwfiac/moduli/pdf/pdf_mod19_16a.pdf
    Fiac compressor pump AB410 - AB510 parts diagram: https://www.bricoutensili.com/en/ind...ttachment=2388 (if in fact this is the pump on Pilot Air TM420 - that's not clear to me)
    Pilot Air in Australia seems to have parts.

    Just one other thing -- for use in the suburbs, quietness is a desirable factor, especially if you are close to a neighbours fence. You could build a full enclosure, allowing for air intake and heat loss, or you could put the compressor on rubber feet/mats and play with muffling the air intake, by enlarging the filters or adding silencers as some suggest (e.g. https://www.garagejournal.com/forum/...ad.php?t=23580) or decoupling the filters as others suggest, e.g. here: http://www.frets.com/HomeShopTech/Sh...mpmuffler.html. For doing that, you'd be better off with a filter that attaches to the pump through a standard pipe fitting e.g. 1" BSP. The Chinook and the Fusheng seem to have that ability (though you'd be doing everything three times over on the Fusheng), but I'm not sure what the Fiac pumps are doing - some sort of square box thing, I'm not clear how that actually engages into the pump itself. Just a little thing to watch out for.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    I am VERY skeptical about air tool manufacturer air flow specs - I have started to double the number provided and find that it usually closer to reality than the number they provide.
    It really requires someone who has tried it then - does a 3hp compressor work with a small sandblasting cabinet, and for how long between pauses?

  10. #10
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Unless you are in a full time work situation its unlikely you will need parts but Hafco should carry parts for all their machines the question would be for how long. The one to watch out for is a nonane brand from a small operation that is likely to go out of business. Its like the lounge suite we bought form a store in a part of Perth we hardly ever go to. The suite had a 10 year warranty but we found out the business vanished some 6 months after we bought the suite.

    Re Noise
    I have mine in an external enclosure and I leave it on 24/7. The tanks has an auto vent valve that runs for half second every 45 minutes between 8am and 6pm to keep the water out of the tank.

    The enclosure is 32mm Tassie oak slab clad on the outside with Colorbond sheeting to match the shed and 50 mm of matters density foam on the inside. The air comes in from a gap under the door the box and it forcibly vented using a 100 mm mains V fan through false ceiling.
    The air gaps still let out some sound but its tolerable. The air vent burst is noisier and more startling than the compressor motor and the somewhat tricky neighbour over the back has not complained in 7 years.

    My DC was initially more of a problem because it is on for much longer periods so I really had to work on that enclosure - now its quieter than his pool pump at the boundary line. The compressor is not as quiet as the DC but i rarely runs for long and any continuous use is kept to working hours during the week when he's not home. The DC I can run anytime of the day or night.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    I am VERY skeptical about air tool manufacturer air flow specs - I have started to double the number provided and find that it usually closer to reality than the number they provide.
    That just about sums it up, and the cheaper the product the more the BS flies.

    I spent only a few years in the air game and the best I can advise on compressors is look at the motor. I replaced a lot more motors than compressor parts. Look at the duty cycle of the unit.

    I use two 3 hp units to run may sandblaster. Flow is tested at 20cfm at 100 psi. (manuf spec states it should be 11.3 per comp , ye right) and I have stipped the heads off and cleaned up the finger valves so who knows what they were really doing when new.

    Using a hafco type 310/340 lpm gun I have enough air to keep me going. When I only had one compressor I was always frustrated waiting for air to come up.

    If I was going by name alone Pilotair would be my pick.
    I don`t know what the new McMillan are like but I did like their old stuff. Have got an old 5cfm unit that I will mount on a tank when a motor is available. Something to give a little air around the garage.


    Tony

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnaduit View Post
    It really requires someone who has tried it then - does a 3hp compressor work with a small sandblasting cabinet, and for how long between pauses?
    I recently came across a barely used (as new) Tool Pro (SCA) 100 litre cabinet which is pretty much identical to the Hafco and American Harbour Freight unit. The specs on the SCA website say that it requires 40 -120 psi and will operate with 120 lpm FAD but 180 lpm is perfect. It came with an as new Black Ridge (also SCA) 2.5 HP Hi-Flow direct drive compressor which is supposed to deliver the matched 180 lpm. I sold the compressor, (which gave me the cabinet for nothing, plus $50 in my pocket) as I already have a 183 lpm V-twin belt drive Toolies (Total Tools) compressor. This compressor only has a 2.2 HP motor and I can say that so far it drives the blast cabinet just fine. I haven't done any changing of nozzle sizes yet but I've done some reasonable sized objects over some length of time with no obvious lack of air pressure or flow. It is currently fitted with a 5mm nozzle.

    I had considered a bigger auxiliary air tank but in theory it really doesn't change the amount of air required and therefore delivered by the compressor. It would reduce start / stop cycle but eventually it is the compressor delivering the air. Unless you have a huge tank you are going to be using the compressor as direct feed most of the time anyway.

    BTW, there is plenty of info on YouTube about enhancing these Blast Cabinets with simple mods.

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