Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 21
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    231

    Default Exposed fasteners - what about using ss nut on steel stud?

    I've got to replace some anti-vibration feet that are in a very exposed area. These are the type with a stud coming up from the rubber foot (Kipp type D). On the current ones, the nut has rusted very badly onto the stud. The other end being rubber, I can't get a grip on them, the nuts are very hard to get at too, so I'll just have to cut them off. I could replace them with Kipp feet that have a stainless steel stud, but that is getting expensive.

    So I'm wondering, what if I get the more sanely-priced rubber feet with ordinary steel studs, but use stainless steel nuts? Will that improve the chances of getting them apart in the future?

    I found a nice article called "Avoiding the pain of rusted nuts" in the magazine Farming Ahead (http://www.farmingahead.com.au/wp-co...242_27.pdf.pdf), which presents various options for dealing with exposed fasteners -- but unfortunately it doesn't discuss the idea of stainless steel nuts with steel bolts or studs.

  2. #2
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    4,389

    Default

    Depends on the extent of the corrosion. If the studs corrode badly and swell the thread above the nut you will have the same problem

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    231

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    Depends on the extent of the corrosion. If the studs corrode badly and swell the thread above the nut you will have the same problem
    I guess I can solve that by cutting the studs down to just a couple of threads proud of the nut. I've seen a couple of charts suggesting there is a galvanic corrosion risk between carbon steel and stainless steel, I don't know if that is a significant risk?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Lebrina
    Posts
    1,283

    Default

    Depending on the environment and cause of corrosion, I would consider using Loctite never seize on both the nut and exposed thread and covering the exposed thread with a snug fitting plastic or rubber tube/hose. Never seize will stand up in an underground mining environment so anything else is pretty easy really. Stainless nuts on carbon steel thread won't achieve all that much IMHO.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Country West Oz
    Age
    72
    Posts
    132

    Default

    Never seize is great stuff.
    Regards
    Bradford

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    231

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Karl Robbers View Post
    Depending on the environment and cause of corrosion, I would consider using Loctite never seize on both the nut and exposed thread and covering the exposed thread with a snug fitting plastic or rubber tube/hose. Never seize will stand up in an underground mining environment so anything else is pretty easy really. Stainless nuts on carbon steel thread won't achieve all that much IMHO.
    I hadn't heard of this. Looked it up on the web, found Loctite Anti Seize in various grades, but the Loctite website leads to dead ends when you try to find out what the various grades are for.

    If it's the 'Silver Grade' (but what little the Loctite website has seems to suggest its only for aluminium though), then Loctite LB 8150 Silver Grade Anti-Seize 20g tube, $18 + postage on eBay

    Bostik Never-Seez regular grade 113g tube $25 on eBay. Or Blackwoods for $30. There's another Never-Seez grade, 'Nuclear Grade'. The mind boggles.

    I'll see if my local industrial supplier has it, or an equivalent.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    231

    Default

    Yep, they have Chemtools brand, 35g for $8. That's better.

    I had to call Chemtools though, to sort out the grades in plain language:
    Copper grade - brass, copper, bronze only
    Nickel grade - steel, stainless steel, aluminium -- this is the one they recommended when I described my application (steel studs going rusty outdoors)
    Silver grade - works really well on stainless steel.

    Premium Nickel Anti-Seize | Chemtools® Australia

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ballarat
    Age
    59
    Posts
    3,041

    Default

    I always use Kopr-Kote. Even in the pretty trying conditions of a steam boiler it works well. While the oil may dry up eventually I found that a thin film of Copper(?) stays there and mitigates a lot of the corrosion.
    Have been using it for just over 40 years now.
    Jet-Lube, LLC. | Kopr-Kote Industrial - High Temp Anti-Sieze

    Phil

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    231

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steamwhisperer View Post
    I always use Kopr-Kote. Even in the pretty trying conditions of a steam boiler it works well. While the oil may dry up eventually I found that a thin film of Copper(?) stays there and mitigates a lot of the corrosion.
    Have been using it for just over 40 years now.
    Jet-Lube, LLC. | Kopr-Kote Industrial - High Temp Anti-Sieze

    Phil
    I looked at your link there Phil - looks good, but where do you get it from here in Australia?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    2,009

    Default

    Hi Guys,

    In the UK it is called "Copperslip" ! Brilliant stuff, often used for anti seize on car brakes.
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
    Posts
    3,265

    Default slip

    Quote Originally Posted by BaronJ View Post
    Hi Guys,

    In the UK it is called "Copperslip" ! Brilliant stuff, often used for anti seize on car brakes.
    not on the linings I hope !!!

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ballarat
    Age
    59
    Posts
    3,041

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnaduit View Post
    I looked at your link there Phil - looks good, but where do you get it from here in Australia?
    I'm pretty sure that total tools have it some of the bearing places do and our local bolt place can get it for me.
    At work we would get it in the 20 litre tub from a fuel supplier, Mobil I think.
    If I can think of any more I'll let you know

    Phil

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Location
    Alphen aan den Rijn, Netherlands
    Posts
    201

    Default

    About combining different metals in a wet environment: be very cautious!
    I assume you have heard about anode's on steel ships and bronze propellers? If electrically connected in a wet environment two different metals will form a kind of battery where the more corrosive metal will sacrifice itself to protect the less corrosive. In this way zink will protect steel by corroding extra fast itself. Also a electrically isolating paste is used between stainless fixtures and aluminium spars on sailing yachts to prevent the aluminium from extreme oxidation. I have seen a steel yacht that sprung leak because a stainless nut had fallen in the bilge and got wedged against the hull. Over time a very local oxidation of the steel hull occurred where the nut connected. The hull was in perfect condition otherwise, but when the owner returned from a shopping trip it had started to leak and half a meter of water was already in his boat. In your application the stud would sacrifice itself to protect the stainless nut but that would result in quick corrosion of the stud. Probably not what you intended. Antiseize might form a electrical isolation layer to protect from this phenomenon, but I am not sure, and the copaslip contains copper so provides no insulation. On the other hand the copper does function like a sort of anode which is part of its antiseize properties.

    Personally I would choose steel nuts and antiseize in your application.

    Peter

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Healesville
    Posts
    1,089

    Default blind nuts

    You could make your own nuts (hex bar makes it easy), just make them longer and dont drill all the way through.
    Add some anti seize, any brand with the copper in it seems to work.

    cheers, shed

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Canberra
    Posts
    231

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by shedhappens View Post
    You could make your own nuts (hex bar makes it easy), just make them longer and dont drill all the way through.
    Add some anti seize, any brand with the copper in it seems to work.

    cheers, shed
    Cap nuts -- classy idea. Especially when filled with anti-seize goop. Yes indeed!

    I just wonder why the Chemtools sales tech said don't use copper anti-seize on steel, use the nickel anti-seize, while everyone here seems to be using copper.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. stud remover
    By morrisman in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 23rd Mar 2017, 06:53 PM
  2. buying fasteners in Adelaide
    By jackaroo in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 15th Apr 2016, 09:53 AM
  3. assorted fasteners
    By snowyskiesau in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 16th Jun 2009, 02:31 PM
  4. 4 Stud Hub
    By Teardrop.Camper in forum TRAILERS & OTHER FABRICATED STUFF
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 8th Jan 2009, 01:47 AM
  5. How should I treat exposed steel?
    By BrentonSpear in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 27th Aug 2006, 02:09 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •