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  1. #16
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    May 2011
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    Murray Bridge S Aust.
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    Just make sure that there's not too much antisieze on there, otherwise it'll hydraulic, and not tighten properly.
    If anything, I'd look at using brass nuts, as that idea seems to work on exhaust manifolds.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Healesville
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    You could probably get away with using soft setting gasket cement instead of anti seize, l have used it on water pumps and thermostat housing bolts and years later they look fine, no corrosion at all.

    shed

  3. #18
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    Jul 2006
    Location
    Canberra
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    Couple of replies, I'll try and do it without "Reply with Quote" ...
    KB, as someone else said above, and I raised earlier still about stainless steel nuts on steel - brass is also in this - there's the galvanic corrosion factor - dissimilar metals leading to sacrificial corrosion of one at the expense of the other - and in both cases I believe the loser is the steel stud. I don't know that it would normally be a problem, but maybe here it will be.

    I never mentioned that the application is a brick saw I got second hand. The studs come up into the bottom of the tray from the rubber mounting feet under the tray. Since the brickie, then the chippie, who previously owned it never washed the thing down, those studs and nuts were covered in wet sludge a lot. Now, I promise I'll hose it out every time ... but there's always the chance "someone else" won't . Really, stainless steel would be the way to go, both rubber feet stud and nut, but that's expensive. Going halfway is tempting but maybe it's not good practice really. I like the cap-nut idea, with anti-seize.

    As to copper anti-seize vs nickel-based, I Googled 'which anti-seize for steel' and couldn't find a straight answer except one manufacturer who said "Copper base anti-seize offers good corrosion protection on all kinds of steel, but not stainless steel", and "Nickel has been used extensively in Anti-Seize materials, because it has good anti-seize and corrosion protection for both steel and stainless steel.".

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ballarat
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    60
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gunnaduit View Post
    I raised earlier still about stainless steel nuts on steel - brass is also in this - there's the galvanic corrosion factor - dissimilar metals leading to sacrificial corrosion of one at the expense of the other - and in both cases I believe the loser is the steel stud. I don't know that it would normally be a problem, but maybe here it will be.
    A long time ago in the food industry needless to say, most things were brass and stainless and we used to get a lot of electrolytic (I think) corrosion which required a sacrificial anode.
    Not really relevant here but it sure was annoying.

    Really, stainless steel would be the way to go, both rubber feet stud and nut, but that's expensive. Going halfway is tempting but maybe it's not good practice really. I like the cap-nut idea, with anti-seize.
    The only thing here is the galling between the stainless nut and stud which without some form of antisieze, is a real problem

    except one manufacturer who said "Copper base anti-seize offers good corrosion protection on all kinds of steel, but not stainless steel"
    It's fine on stainless steel so long as the environment isn't excessive in high(ish) temperatures, above about 300 deg. celsius.
    I worked on a hot well which fed hot, sometimes at boiling point water to a steam boiler. The make-up float valve inside the hot well was all stainless as were the bolts and nuts. We were forever galling the nuts and bolts until we started using the copper based anti sieze. Never galled another bolt and ten years later they are still the same ones...except for a couple of nuts I dropped to the bottom of the tank. I'm sure I will get them out eventually.

    Phil

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
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    N.W.Tasmania
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    Quote Originally Posted by KBs PensNmore View Post
    Just make sure that there's not too much antisieze on there, otherwise it'll hydraulic, and not tighten properly.
    If anything, I'd look at using brass nuts, as that idea seems to work on exhaust manifolds.
    Kryn
    Not sure I would go with brass nuts, corrosion would likely be an issue in a wet environment, not usually a problem with exhausts because they are usually dry. Kopr kote, I think that is how Ampol used to spell the product that they sold, was used by the mining company I worked for on their drill rigs. It enabled the operator to break the joints between steels and between steels and drill bits or reamers. These 40 tonne drill rigs might have the same drill bit and reamer on for months, drilling in hard rock, but the Kop Kote ennabled the joint to be broken reasonably easily most of the time when it was needed to be done.
    Getting back to the original issue, that of preventing corrosion on the levelling feet, something which may be worth trying is Denso Tape, an open weave cloth tape impregnated with a greasy wax, something like bees wax, which can be used over the anti seize of your choice, or just used dry, and it will keep those threads like new for years. I think that outfits like Blackwoods would stock it, or perhaps ships chandlers or similar businesses, no idea of the cost because Ihave never bought it myself, but it is a great product IMO.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Location
    Wodonga Vic
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    33
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    366

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    There aren't many things more inert, or as slick as PTFE and the PTFE aerosols (dry lube) getting around claim to have great anti-seize properties DEOX R30 Non-Stick Dry Lubricant with PTFE | Chemtools® Australia I'm not sure if it's of any use in your application but it's another option to consider

    Edit: fixed link

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