Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 33
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    1,063

    Default Moving 600 kg Mill

    Hi,

    I'm going to have to push/pull my new mill about 25 metres over my backyard lawn.

    The lawn is rather soggy. I was going to use 2-3 mm thick sheet metal but it expensive. I'm now thinking of using thick ply. Maybe 16 mm thick or formwork ply. Has anyone tried using it? Will it handle the weight (600 kg spread over a three or four 1" bars)?

    Ben.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Age
    50
    Posts
    150

    Default

    Do you have engine crane?
    Using Tapatalk

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    melbourne
    Posts
    35

    Default

    I would say yes...but you will need 2 pieces of ply as it's hard to re position one with a 660 kg mill sitting on it.
    The transition from one sheet of ply to the other is where you might have a problem.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    1,063

    Default

    Yeah, I'll have to get two pieces of ply for the move. Was thinking of getting one 2400 mm cut in half.

    No engine crane, was going to hire one for the day.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
    Posts
    3,224

    Default roofing iron

    This might work for you. I've used corrigated roofing iron for that type of job, it always works for me . The machinery slides along the high peaks easily and the corrigations add strength . If going uphill, I use a little 1 ton chain block and anchor it to anything nearby , fit a rope or chain low down around the base of the mill and slowly haul the machine along witht he chain block. If on level ground or downhill, you can also use a long bar and gently pry up the base of the machine and it will slide along a few inches at a time. I sometimes use gal. pipes on top of the corrigated sheets too. The most important thing is to be patient , slowly it goes, might take a few hours .

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Healesville
    Posts
    939

    Default

    Ben I assume that you cant get a trailer into your backyard?
    What about one of your 3 neighbors, can you pull down a section of fence and get your trailer in that way?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    ex Perth, now Mittagong
    Posts
    72

    Default

    Years ago I helped a friend move an Elliot mill, Bridgeport size and configuration, over a lawn much the same as you are contemplating. we used scaffold planks and round-bar rollers about 20 mm diameter. This worked very well. The problem with using an engine crane and plywood would be to get the wheels over the joints but could be solved by laying 4 mm steel plate strips on top of the ply. The scaffold planks and pipe/round-bar rollers would probably be easier.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    1,063

    Default

    Thanks for the ideas.

    No rear yard access. I'll be putting that one on the list if we buy another house (plus a bigger shed). My neighbors are good guys but older than me. I will have some help from a mate though.

    I like the corrugated iron idea. I'm now working at the big green hardware place (a man's gotta work) so I will get "team member discount" , nothings cheap though, the plywood will be around $70 to $90 per sheet.

    Ben.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,647

    Default

    Another option is to buy some treated pine sleepers and space them apart like tracks and then move the mill on steel rollers that roll along the treated pine. The treated pine sleepers will deform much less making it a bit easier, they will cost much less than plywood and will survive so you can use them for another project in the garden.

    Slow, controlled and steady will win this race!

    Good Luck

    Simon
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Age
    50
    Posts
    150

    Default

    Years ago we moved a large safe, after looking at the hassle and safety we rang a crane truck place.
    They quoted $250 for the onsite move and turned up with a 80 ton remote control hiab with massive reach.
    Did the job so easy and turns out we where quoted for 1 hour.
    Using Tapatalk

  11. #11
    BobL is offline Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    3,972

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave J View Post
    Years ago we moved a large safe, after looking at the hassle and safety we rang a crane truck place.
    They quoted $250 for the onsite move and turned up with a 80 ton remote control hiab with massive reach.
    Did the job so easy and turns out we where quoted for 1 hour.
    I can second this method.

    When working on a nature playground we had to instal a sculpture made up of a number of logs into a depression the middle of existing playground equipment and had the option of dismantling existing playground equipment land laying a ramp into the depression and using a front end loader with a log grapple to move them into position, or use a crane with a long reach. The heaviest log was about 700 kg and the reach needed was ~30m which it did easily. It also cost only ~$250

    The cost of cranes often depends on where the power lines near your house are - if these are in the way or even nearby the $$ can escalate dramatically.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Drouin Vic
    Posts
    25

    Default

    When I brought my mill home, I scratched my head over how to get it off the trailer and into the shed, I ended up getting a truck with a hiab to come and lift it off. Cost me $300 as a minimum fee. I was hoping he could do it inside the shed but there wasn't enough height to unfold the hiab and he would not drive the truck even a few meters with the crane unfolded, so he lifted it off outside and used the reach to place it inside the shed door.
    If I had the time over, I would spend the $300 to build a sturdy, wheeled gantry with trailer stub axles and wheels. Then I would have still had the gantry when the shaper came home, then the surface grinder, etc etc etc.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    279

    Default

    G'day Ben, exciting times, a new mill.
    This Saturday last a mate and I picked up a crusty old Qualos mill, which is also an estimated 600kg.
    It was already on old scaffold tube (about 48mm diameter), and relatively movable on the rough carport concrete slab.
    At the end of the carport we pushed it out onto lawn, using scrap plate that was around. Had to do this for the engine crane to lift high enough for trailer.
    A ratchet winch kept things under control, for the final horizontal pull into the trailer.
    I'd recommend winches or chain blocks, if there is any slope in the path.
    Ply, mdf, chipboard that is thick enough sounds ok. The bigger surface contact area of pipe rollers has the benefit of less sinking, compared to wheels. There are down-sides, of course.
    Simon's comment about using 're-usable' track material, has great cred, of course.
    regs,
    Andrew
    'Waratah' spring hammer by Hands & Scott c.1911- 20, 'Duffy, Todd & Williams' spring hammer c.1920, Premo lathe- 1953, Premo filing machine.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    1,063

    Default

    Hi,

    Had a quick look at work today, 3.2 mm corrugated iron sheet 3.6 mtrs x 1.6 mtrs is about $48.00. Buy one sheet and cut it in half would be the cheapest option so far. Or two ironwood 200 x 100 3.2 mtr sleepers at about the same might work.

    The HIAB to get the MM off the trailer cost me a slab of beer.

    There's one 90 degree turn I gotta make which also has a slight slope which has me worried.

    Gotta sell the Hercus first.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2015
    Location
    melbourne
    Posts
    175

    Default

    I made a little trolley with 6 or 8 castors to move my mill, but it was partially dismantled.
    I'd think treated pine sleepers, 200x 50 would do, 2@ 2.4 and cut them in half would carry the weight of the mill on pipe rollers
    4 @ full length would probably be easier.


    Russ

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Moving a mill
    By welder in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 52
    Last Post: 25th Jul 2017, 08:19 PM
  2. Moving again...
    By bwal74 in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 17th Sep 2015, 12:53 PM
  3. $250 well spent - moving my mill
    By bollie7 in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 24th Feb 2012, 09:09 AM
  4. Moving a Mill
    By electrosteam in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 8th Jul 2010, 12:03 PM
  5. Moving a Mill - How to scare yourself senseless
    By hux in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 11th Jun 2007, 04:37 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •