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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    163

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    Big flat rocks for the garden. Damp soil. Um.

    Bolted wood beam to end of corrugated iron sheet (2nd hand!) and wrapped end around beam for strength.
    Crowbarred side of rock up, various chocks used, slid gal under as far as possible.
    Winch on LandCruiser, pulled rock fully onto gal sheet. (1 or 2 off 50 mm water pipe underneath? Maybe.)
    Winch to wood beam at end, gently pull. It slid nicely.
    Moved a lot of rocks that way for the garden. Do it slowly.

    Cheers
    Roger

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Charlestown NSW
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,022

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    Also consider removing the table and the head (if its a bridgeport type) to get the weight down a bit.

    peter

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    sydney ( st marys )
    Age
    59
    Posts
    3,932

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    Ben also consider lifting it up out of the lawn and your misses asking when are you going to fix that mess up after it buries itself if it GPRS rs up.

    Sent from my T85 using Tapatalk

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    1,063

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    Morning,

    I liked the idea about the garden sleepers but I thought about it a bit and think there's a too much of a chance of the mill tipping over or running off the edges. So I think I'll got the corrugated iron route.

    A bloke is coming around to view and maybe buy the Hercus today. So I gotta do something. I also decided to buy a small engine crane of gumtree for the move. A cheap 1.25T SCA one, it'll help with the Hercus move and putting the head back on the big mill.

    Not worried about the mess. It's just another project I gotta get to anyway.

    Ben.

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    3,650

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    I tell you what, you will not regret having that engine crane. They come in handy so many times. Every time I purchase another machine I have re re-arrange my shed. I couldn't do it without an engine crane. So handy.

    Simon
    Girl, I don't wanna know about your mild-mannered alter ego or anything like that." I mean, you tell me you're, uh, super-mega-ultra-lightning babe? That's all right with me. I'm good. I'm good.

  6. #21
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    3,975

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    Quote Originally Posted by simonl View Post
    I tell you what, you will not regret having that engine crane. They come in handy so many times. Every time I purchase another machine I have re re-arrange my shed. I couldn't do it without an engine crane. So handy.
    I agree about the crane. The Mens shed had two and was selling one and I nearly bought it but I have nowhere to put it especially seeing as I could borrow the Mens shed one at any time Then they went and sold the second one. Fortunately a mate that lives 3 minutes away bout one and I have access to that one if I need it.

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Vic
    Age
    42
    Posts
    430

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    The engine crane came in handy for me a few times too. I think use the sleepers as the "railway" and the pipes as roller on top is better, space them out wider than the footprint of the machine if you have too?

    IMG_20120527_130756.jpg

    IMG_20121002_104952.jpg

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    1,063

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    Hi,

    Well I moved the hercus out of the shed and into the garage using the 1" rollers, two sheets of corrugated iron and muscle. Now the buyer just has to pick it up. The move took me an hour and a half to do by myself and was at times hair-raising and rather difficult (I really should of gotten my mate to help).

    I'm not sure if the two sheets of corrugated iron will be up to the task of supporting 600 kg's. Plus getting around the 90 degree corner was difficult. Also, at the corner is where the land slopes the most.

    I will also need to buy some new pipe, I bought a 1.8 metre length from work and cut it into four lengths. I should of cut it into three 600 mm lengths. The shorter lengths won't give me enough wiggle room if I need it.

    I'm now really considering taking the table off the knee for two reasons: one to simply fit the machine through the door of the shed; and to make the machine a little bit lighter.

    Ben.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,670

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    Moving any "top heavy" machinery is going to be a bit hairy, particularly on your own. I would get a second or even a third person to assist !
    Much safer.
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    1,063

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    Here's a comparison shot:


    Ben.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    369

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    +1 on engine lift. I bought a 2T for about $250 or so and it has been incredibly handy.

    However, I treat it with great great caution - like it could be made from 'chinesium' so every usage is made with extreme caution. Basically, I treat it like it could break at any moment and therefore always carry things as low as possible, always leave myself 'jump space' and if I can, use the 500kg rating above the weight of the thing I am moving. All pretty normal precautions I think anyways.

    The one big trouble with engine lifts is their 'legs' are meant to go underneath something .. erm .. like an engine in a car ... not *around* something like machine sitting on the floor. Can be awkward.

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    100

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    Quote Originally Posted by StrayAlien View Post
    +1 on engine lift. I bought a 2T for about $250 or so and it has been incredibly handy.

    However, I treat it with great great caution - like it could be made from 'chinesium' so every usage is made with extreme caution. Basically, I treat it like it could break at any moment and therefore always carry things as low as possible, always leave myself 'jump space' and if I can, use the 500kg rating above the weight of the thing I am moving. All pretty normal precautions I think anyways.

    The one big trouble with engine lifts is their 'legs' are meant to go underneath something .. erm .. like an engine in a car ... not *around* something like machine sitting on the floor. Can be awkward.
    Yes i totally agree with you about using these chinesum engine lift cranes, there is only one bolt that holds that chain on.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    45
    Posts
    571

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    Hmm yes chinesium is about as reliable and consistant as indianium.

    Here the former is about to become more expensive in the US.

    Just glad my last machinery move was done at the workshop with plenty of space and a solid gravel surface under foot. Wouldn't have been a good look digging up the suburban backyard with 6 tonne Tele!
    www.lockwoodcanvas.com.au

    I will never be the person who has everything, not when someone keeps inventing so much cool new stuff to buy.

    From an early age my father taught me to wear welding gloves . "Its not to protect your hands son, its to put out the fire when u set yourself alight".

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Central Coast, NSW
    Posts
    1,063

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    Yeah the engine crane was only for putting the head back on the big mill once it's in place and maybe any other odd job that comes along.

    I'm having doubts about moving the mill to the backyard shed. I've started the process of grovelling and selling my soul to my wife in-order to leave it set up in the garage. No luck so far.

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Frankston south
    Posts
    21

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    If you can fit a rough terrain forklift or bobcat, the job would be a lot safer, I wouldn't consider using an engine crane, I think tears will be shed.

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