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  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Melbourne
    Age
    30
    Posts
    495

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    Good job paying about the right amount. Your motor plans are good but I wouldn't bother getting a new motor just yet, you'll be able to overdrive the existing one with a vfd to some extent.

    Also as you are new to machining 500rpm is fine unless you are doing tiny work or really want the best chip breaking on insert tools.

    My advice is keep it cheap while you learn. If you decide you need fancy stuff you'll want a whole new lathe.

  2. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    74

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    Well done! That's a good price for a bit of Australian machine tool history.

    It looks identical to mine. What date is stamped on the top of the bed at the tailstock end? Mine's 1941, so during the war.

    Does that large plate say Herbert Nuttall?

    Graham.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Murray Bridge S Aust.
    Age
    66
    Posts
    3,240

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    Thanks for the pics, love the Torana in the background and the nice BIG shed.
    Kryn
    To grow old is mandatory, growing up is optional.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Australia east coast
    Age
    65
    Posts
    2,266

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    Quote Originally Posted by Viperx85 View Post

    Need to decide what to do with the motor, Since it doesnt have a quick change gearbox I think ill stick with a 3-phase motor and VFD so I have RPM Control. Also going off the Plate on the machine the highest RPM is 500rpm which seems quite low???

    Im thinking a higher rpm motor with more HP with a VFD would be a good choice? Not sure if ill have to look at changing pulley ratios?
    That's a plain bearing headstock. If you overspeed it too much you'll kill the bearings. How much is too much? Yeah - that's the question.

    In the first instance I'd keep the motor speed etc as-is. You'll have plenty of work to do without worrying about that.

    I always had a soft spot for the Nuttall geared head lathes - I got a lot of use out of one at TAFE. Not the best machines out there, but pretty robust and simple. The clutched spindle was a great feature.

    PDW

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    369

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    Quote Originally Posted by Viperx85 View Post
    So took awhile but I offered my Boss $250 to get the haggling started, he said heh he could get $1000 at Auction.... so few weeks later it went to Auction, I got it for $225.00!
    Oh man I laughed out loud at that!! Very well done. You can still make good stuff on these old girls. I have a 1941 lathe and am very happy. It is your choice but if it were me, I'd do a complete nut-and-bolt job on it - even if just to clean it up and remove 60+ years of chips and crud. In doing so, you'll get to know your machine very well and, even if not attending to immediately, you'll learn what need fixing or 'working with''.

    Greg.

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Hobart, Australia
    Age
    32
    Posts
    9

    Default

    So I cannot find any date stamp between the ways at the end, there is pretty thick industrial paint over the bed tho so maybe its hidden underneath, will find out once I strip it all down.

    I do plan to fully strip it, clean it, replace any bearings if possible, lick of paint and re-assemble.

    The biggest issue with it I can see at this stage is the condition of the ways, Have attached a few pics. whoever used it in the past was very rough and sure didnt take care of the ways!!!

    Ideally would be re-ground but not sure if anyone in Tasmania does it or if it would be feasible. I think ill have to look at the gouges as "oil gallery's" Ill stone down any high spots but yea it is a bummer. Would you say this makes it scrap metal without having them re-ground?

    Front Way
    Rear way.jpg

    Rear
    Front way.jpg

    Here is a few pics of the various plates and details on the machine too

    carraige.jpgnutal herbert.jpgTPI.jpgspindlespeeds.jpgAlfred Herbert.jpg

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    74

    Default Nuttall serial number

    Here's a shot of where the build date and serial number is stamped on mine.

    Graham.

    IMG_8401.jpgIMG_8404.jpg

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Hobart, Australia
    Age
    32
    Posts
    9

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    Oh I was looking between the ways where the bracing was. Found mine, 29th July 1942, I wish my bed was as good as yours!

    fr_4413_size640.jpg

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Hobart, Australia
    Age
    32
    Posts
    9

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    So what do people think? Is it not worth it restoring and using with all that damage on the ways?

    Another lathe has come up for sale from a local workshop, much newer, gear drive head, ways look near on perfect but he will likely want $1500-2000 for it (waiting to hear back)

    I do like the idea of restoring and owning a piece of history tho and keeping it going, Just wish the ways were good. But im not sure how much it will actually effect things.... Like yeh its got chips and scrapes but if I stoned off any high points then would it still be find given 80% of the surface area is still normal height?

  10. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    South of Adelaide
    Posts
    466

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    I would try using it and see what results you get, before you lash out on grinding the bed. I have a Lathe with a bed in worse condition than that and i can still make good parts on it.
    I have noticed on a number of fourms that home shop guys think that lathe bed ways need to be perfect, and want to have them reground at the slightest sign of wear. In reality it takes a bloody lot of wear to make a lathe unusable.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Melbourne
    Age
    30
    Posts
    495

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    Yeah I have used some trashed machines and you can get good parts. The only downside is when you are learning it can be hard to tell weather to blame the operator or machine for poor results (hint 95% of the time it was the operator).

  12. #27
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    74

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    Quote Originally Posted by Viperx85 View Post
    So what do people think? Is it not worth it restoring and using with all that damage on the ways?
    I think you are on the right track planning to stone down the high spots on the ways. It's difficult to be sure from the photos, but much of the damage looks like it's from people dropping and dragging things across the machine bed, as opposed to actual wear from the carriage and tailstock. If you can get the high spots down, you should be back to a generally straight surface. These machines have the nice wide ways so there is plenty of surface area left even if there are many negative dings present.

    If you have a straight edge that you trust you could check the flatness of the ways across those areas that look like actual wear. Test the flatness with a feeler gauge under the straight edge.

    I did run mine briefly, and turned a piece of steel for a test before stripping it down to transport it from where it lay. What I noticed was how solid and heavy it felt. If your current "hobby lathe" is your reference, this Nuttall should perform so much better even if it has some wear because it is larger, heavier, stiffer, and has those wider ways.

    I say go for it! Clean it up, get some new paint on it, put it back together, and use it. It may not be your last lather purchase, but it could well end up being your favourite.

    Graham.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    22

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    Given that you have this in your hand and it doesn't owe you a lot you should at least get it cleaned up to basic running condition to better evaluate just how usable it is. If nothing else that would make it a little more saleable.
    I have a 14" Macson of similar vintage and the ways are pretty sad to look at in places and downright stuffed in others but as it is a hobby machine I have a lot of fun with it.
    This has flat ways and at the tailstock end there is even a section where some neanderthal has used it as an anvil in that past - I stoned the high spots as you have planned to do and that was well worth doing.
    This is the area directly in front of the chuck where there have been some serious swarf attacks in the past and lots of dropped bits and pieces (on top of the carriage wear).

    IMG_2709.jpg

    The 500rpm speed limitation is definitely enough to play with at this stage - my Macson is plain bearing and has a standard top speed of 350rpm.
    While well under the ideal speed for carbide inserts it can still be used - this is a current project on Aluminium using a cheapo Banggood holder and insert and I am well pleased with the result. It does produce stringy chips but the finish is good enough for backyard work.
    Did you get any old HSS tools with it? Even the saddest looking old HSS tool will sharpen up into a good usable piece.

    IMG_2708.jpg

    IMG_2710.jpg

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    near Warragul, Victoria
    Posts
    3,224

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    Hi Viper

    The ways don't look that bad to me. I've got an old Visby thats looks far worse than that and it produces accurate work . As the others have mentioned, the operator is the most important item ! You can adjust your methods up to a point, in order to account for wear .

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Hobart, Australia
    Age
    32
    Posts
    9

    Default

    Thanks guys! have given me abit more enthusiasm for the project now knowing all is not lost with the ways, Still been busy with other stuff but will go ahead with it asap!

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