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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,675

    Thumbs up Bradford Industrial Museum.

    Hi Guys,

    I've wanted to visit the Bradford Industrial Museum for some time ! Today I had the opportunity to go there and view some of the exhibits.
    I've only just got back home and couldn't wait to process all the pictures that I took, but one exhibit in particular grabbed my attention. So I'm posting a couple of photographs, one of the item and the other of the description.

    07-02-2018-002a.JPG 07-02-2018-001b.jpg

    I can honestly say I've never seen anything like it...
    Who would design a car with one wheel, the wheel that does the steering, offset in such an unbalanced manner.

    I'll add some more of the pictures that I took later. Very much something to interest most people, and I didn't get chance to see the whole of the museums exhibits.
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Healesville
    Posts
    948

    Default

    G/day BaronJ, they improved the design by getting rid of one of the wheels
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_Flying_Squirrel

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    Hi Shed,

    I took some photographs of some of the motorcycles in the museum. A Scott might have been among them. I'll have a look later and post them.

    I do think that the car is really weird.
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,675

    Thumbs up Motorcycles.

    Hi Guys, Shed,

    These pictures are the only ones of a Panther with a side car and two that I think may be Scott's. Enjoy...

    08-02-2018-093.jpg 08-02-2018-094.jpg 08-02-2018-095.jpg

    There are boards with some details on, the green corners in the pictures, but unfortunately the camera battery started going flat around this time, however next chance I get to go to the museum again I will photograph them.
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,675

    Thumbs up Jowett.

    Hi Guys,

    Sticking with the transport theme, "Jowett" manufactured cars and vans in Bradford right up to 1954. I remember driving a Bradford van in the sixties. Actually the very first motor that I drove, but that is another story.

    08-02-2018-084.jpg 08-02-2018-085.jpg

    This is the Jowett Bradford van, like the one that I referred to. Twin cylinder, Crash gearbox and at 40 mph wandered all over the road like a drunk. Much fun ! I remember loosing a TV because the back doors weren't closed properly.

    08-02-2018-087.jpg 08-02-2018-086.jpg

    Jowett also made cars like this one and the red one pictured below.

    08-02-2018-089.jpg 08-02-2018-088.jpg

    During the fifties, the Jupiter won its class in the Le man 24 hour race three years in a row. Very similar in appearance to the Austin "A" series of sports coupé.

    08-02-2018-090.jpg 08-02-2018-091.jpg

    Pictured above is a Jowett chassis and a close up of the two cylinder horizontally opposed engine with the Lucas dynamo at the top, belt driven straight of the end of the crank.

    08-02-2018-092.JPG

    Here is a poster showing the time line of production from inception in 1905 to 1954 when production ceased.

    There is another selection of exhibits, passenger transport, that I didn't get to see this time around. So I don't have any pictures of them.

    Enjoy !
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Healesville
    Posts
    948

    Default

    BaronJ when I was about 10 yo a nice lady gave my mates one of these (i think? or very similar) for a paddock bomb, yup we smashed it to smithereens
    From memory the nice lady said the car yard would not trade it and apparently nobody wanted it, believe it or not it was in pristine condition when we got our grubby little mits on it.


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    Hi Shed,

    You vandal

    Austin "Six" Lovely car, quite a valuable asset if you have one today. There is one in the Beaulieu Motor museum in Hampshire.

    https://www.beaulieu.co.uk/

    Thanks for that picture.
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,675

    Thumbs up Real Old Time Transport.

    Hi Guys,

    Some more pictures, This time from the stables, which is across the road from the Saddlery.


    08-02-2018-019.JPG 08-02-2018-Vardo.JPG

    This is a photograph of a "Vardo" a Romany caravan of the 1800's. The sign board reads,

    This vehicle is a traveling living wagon, or Vardo, which belonged to Rev George Bramwith Everes. He was a Methodist preacher and naturalist writer born in Hull in 1884 and became known as a radio personality, Romany of the BBC.



    08-02-2018-021.jpg 08-02-2018-020.jpg

    A rather interesting Brougham carriage made in the 1800's.

    08-02-2018-023.jpg 08-02-2018-022.jpg 08-02-2018-024.jpg

    But look at what is hiding behind it ! A steam driven fire engine. Unfortunately I couldn't get any closer to it to take any pictures of the controls. However I'm told that it is going to be moved at some point, to a better location. At the moment it is housed in the stables.

    I'm going to have a look in the Saddlery next.

    Enjoy...
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,675

    Thumbs up Saddlery.

    Hi Guys,

    Now on to the Saddlery. Most of the exhibits were behind glass, so some reflections are present in some of the pictures. This building had a boiler house joined on to it. Even though it was a freezing cold day, it was very warm in there, pleasant on such a day. It was nice in the forge too, one of two forges on the site.

    08-02-2018-028.jpg

    This is the Saddlery forge. Quite an array of different tools.

    08-02-2018-014.jpg 08-02-2018-012.jpg

    All these horseshoes were made here on the museum site. An interesting portable forge hearth was displayed. The lever operated blower mounted directly underneath the tray. This would have been used by Journeymen that travelled around the country making horseshoes and doing repairs to carriages and the like.

    08-02-2018-008.jpg 08-02-2018-009.jpg

    These are some of the leather working tools that the saddle maker would have used when making bridles and reigns for the working horses of the day.

    08-02-2018-010.jpg 08-02-2018-011.jpg

    A selection of brasses and name plates.

    08-02-2018-013.jpg

    This poster explains some of the things used during bad and icy weather to help horses grip the cobbles.

    After visiting the Saddlery, I went into the old mill building, in there are wonderful displays of machinery and engines that were used in the manufacture and maintenance of the machinery used in the making of yarn and cloth.

    Up next, Workshop !
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    moonbi nsw Aus
    Age
    64
    Posts
    285

    Default

    Great lot of photos there. I love to look in museums as you have pictured. I like to spend time just looking at the detail that the old manufacturers went to to make an article pleasing to the eye as well as being functional. 18 months ago the wife and I did a short trip to Tassie. At Delorain was a museum which was empty of other tourists. It meant we could wonder around and spend as much time as we liked looking at what was on show. Very enjoyable
    Just do it!

    Kind regards Rod

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    Hi Rod, Guys,

    Yes my wife and I also enjoy visiting museums and the like. Re, lack of visitors ! There seems to be a distinct lack of people going to visit these places, whether it is austerity that is the problem, I don't know, certainly there are more school trips to these places than "general public" visiting, apart from that the visitors that we do see, tend to be the older generation, cough, cough. Some of the places that used to have café’s have closed them and some no longer have eating areas. Bradford doesn't have a café, only a coffee machine and somewhere to sit to eat your packed lunch. That we found very disappointing. One of the staff said that there were so few visitors that the museum might have to reduce opening hours or even close. So I must admit that I do try to promote them.

    The museum staff were very good, helping me get at some exhibits to take photographs, and a couple of demonstrations were given, even though we were the only two visitors there. One actually said that it was nice to actually have someone to demonstrate to.

    I took well over a hundred photos and whilst I know that I cannot post them all, I'm trying to group them into categories.

    I hope that you all enjoy looking at my photographs.
    Thanks.
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Ballarat
    Age
    59
    Posts
    2,968

    Default

    Hi Baron
    I hope there is a steam category

    Phil
    ps Loved the Shand Mason.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,675

    Default

    Hi Phil,

    Yes there is a little steam stuff ! I'll sort out those pictures next. Watch this space.
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    North Yorkshire UK
    Posts
    1,675

    Thumbs up Mills, drills and line shafts.

    Hi Guys,

    This next category is all machinery, all old and all heavy stuff. I've also tried to show how these machines were driven from line shafts and a ruddy great big steam engine, but I'll post pictures of that later. One thing that struck me was how crude some of this machinery is and how ascetically pleasing in their construction. There are some really interesting pieces in this exhibit.

    08-02-2018-064.jpg 08-02-2018-063.JPG

    This is some of the line shafting that is used to distribute power to the machines on the workshop floor. Somewhere I have some pictures of the driven end of this quite extensive system. I thought that they were in this group, I post them when I find them. It is interesting how they switched drive on and off to the individual machines using live and fixed pulleys, then moving the belt from one to the other. Also notice the distinct lack of guarding ! EHO would have a fit if this gear was in use today.


    08-02-2018-059a.JPG

    I've chosen this rather interesting piece of machinery as the first picture simply because of what it does ! It would be more at home in a forge. It is a five place trimming hammer. A guy that I spoke to said that it was used to make the steel strip used for making tyres for carriage wheels among other things. I couldn't get around the other side, to take any pictures but I'm told that it hammered and trimmed steel bar to a set thickness and width.

    08-02-2018-058.jpg 08-02-2018-081.jpg 08-02-2018-068.jpg

    I'm sure that everyone will be familiar with these items. In the foreground of the first picture is, I'm told a "Glazing Wheel". I don't have a clue what it is supposed to do ! There is another Identical wheel on the other end of a belt driven shaft. I think the lathe is a DSG similar to the one in the third picture.

    08-02-2018-061.jpg

    This old mill was another interesting piece of machinery, just look at the belt drive. not only does it take power for the spindle from the overhead line shafting, but it also provides power feeds to the head which is traversed rather than the table. It also has power down feed on the quill and a power take off for the coolant pump. This must be a vary early example of the modern day vertical mill.

    08-02-2018-059b.JPG

    This is another machine which would be more at home in a forge. Actually there is a more modern version of a spring hammer in the second of the two forges on this site.
    The fixed and live flat belt pulleys and the clutch mechanism can be seen very well in this picture.

    08-02-2018-065.jpg 08-02-2018-066.JPG 08-02-2018-082.jpg 08-02-2018-060.jpg

    These three pictures show a long bed shaper with a single work table, though I'm told that it could have others fitted to it to support long work pieces. The middle picture is one of a planing machine, basically an inverted shaper, just look at that stack of gears belonging to it. The third picture is a double ended machine, having a slotting mechanism on one side and a pillar drill on the other. The last picture in this group is a radial arm drill. The big bar in the middle used to lock the table in position under the spindle. The position of the vise is locked by nuts and a plate underneath.

    08-02-2018-067.jpg

    This intriguing and very complicated looking machine is a precision grinder. Again the belt drive that not only provides drive to the grinding wheel but also provides the power to traverse the table and auto reverse it. You can see how the development of the modern universal grinder has occurred. With the advent of the electric motor taking over the driving of these functions.

    08-02-2018-083.JPG

    This machine doesn't need any explanation I'm sure. Apart from the motive power source that has been taken over today by the electric motor.

    I'm going down to the next exhibition chamber to see the steam engine.

    Enjoy Please let me know what you think.
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    N.W.Tasmania
    Posts
    957

    Default

    Thanks for this terrific thread and all the pictures BaronJ, the museum looks great and it's hard to imagine that they have so few visitors. I am just wondering if the "Glazing Wheel" is just a wheel to grind the edges of glass panes. Some years ago we had the good fortune to visit "The Lost Gardens of Heligan" down in Cornwall. This garden was on a large estate in Cornwall and the owners were so devastated when many of their gardeners were killed in action in The Great War, that they just abandoned the estate. From memory I think only about three of about 12 or more gardeners returned, so it is easy to see how upsetting it would have been. When the place was abandoned the trees eventually grew too big for their locations, or just fell down, and seedling trees shot up everywhere, pretty well destroying the built environment, including the impressive Victorian Glasshouse which features beavertail cut glass. The idea being that the curved cut of the beavertail was placed on the lower edge of what was essentially a glass tile, causing any rain to be directed to run down the centreline of the tile, away from the frame which contained it. this saved the frame from problems with rot or corrosion, or at least extended its lifespan. Perhaps that is one use of a glazing wheel.
    Those gardens are very well worth a visit, as are the nearby "Eden Project" gardens if you have never been, Sir Tim Smit has had a big hand in the restoration of Heligan and the creation of The Eden Project. They are both worth a full day of your time, a good excuse to get the camper van out when your summer returns.

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