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Thread: Drop in anchors

  1. #1
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    Default Drop in anchors

    Not exactly metalworking, but workshop. I'm wondering if anyone has used drop in anchors and can give some tips on drill bit size. I had an overhead application and thought the drill bit should be the same size as the anchor. However after inserting I wasn't as confident. I may have just been overthinking it. I don't have a setting tool however and was just going to punch the set to the "seems about right" setting

  2. #2
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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mcwX70dxGw Looks like drill bit should be the same diameter as the anchor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Com_VC View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9mcwX70dxGw Looks like drill bit should be the same diameter as the anchor.
    You mean like this? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-s5u_zG6V4

    I know how to use Google too

    I was interested in those who have actually used these anchors. They're not used much in residential applications, but are used extensively commercially as they're fast and cheap but only suitable for solid concrete. I believe their pullout strength is very good. I was using some plastic plugs to hold up light fittings but the plugs let go and one of the lights literally fell down. Given this is precisely the application for the drop in anchors I figured I'd use them.

    Before anyone suggests it, yes there are other alternatives. No, dynabolts would not be one of them. I had these anchors and want to use them as much for the experience as to stop a light falling on my noggin.

  4. #4
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    Yeah sorry haven't used these yet, but I have a bunch of them. I've only ever used Chemsets, screwbolts, dynabolts & truebolts.

    I'm sure they would hold a light fitting quite well. I seen a video before where they used a hydraulic ram to test the strength of them (about 10 ton I think) and the concrete brick block cracked.

  5. #5
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    Hi Pete F,
    I have never used that style of anchor, after watching the video I would not use them in your application. I have often had steel in concrete style fixtures slip and in your application having a light drop on your head is definitely not a good outcome. I would use a piece of stainless steel threaded bar with two part epoxy mixed with enough cab-o-sil to thicken the mixture,applied to both the thread and hole and hold in place until set.I used this combination to fix my jetty to our concrete deck and it has gone through two semi cyclones with huge waves and nothing has moved
    Bob

  6. #6
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    Bob, these are used extensively in industry. Next time you go into a commercial building and park your car, look at how the sprinkler system etc is fixed to the concrete. Chances are it will be these. I believe their holding power is extremely good. Unlike dydnabolts, I believe (again, never tried to do so with these) that they come out easier than dynabolts. Sometimes dynabolts come back out ok (if you're lucky) but if they get stuck they can sometimes be a real bugger to get out. Don't ask how I know that!

    I agree, I don't like plastic plugs WALL plugs for applications like this, but chemical setting is a complete overkill in my opinion, even if you could get the epoxy/rod up into an overhead hole and to stay put properly. For balustrading and critical applications, I definitely chemical set 8 mm S/S rods in. But completely impractical in this instance; no jetties are under cyclonic thread in this workshop. It's a 2-3 kg light fitting and the only wind is from last night's Nasi Goreng

    Again, I want to stress, I'm not looking for alternatives as to how to fix light fittings. That light fitting is comfortably re-installed with a couple of screws in oversized plastic plugs whacked in real tight, and I can pretty much guarantee that sucker isn't re-entering from orbit any time soon. BUT during the process I was wondering about using my drop in anchors I had here and they didn't seem to be fitting well. However I've since seen/read that the hole can be oversize (as holes drilled in concrete tend to be) and they will still set ok. So I'm considering drilling the plugs out and re-setting with these, just for the experience. I've read up all about them but thought I'd ask here for somebody who has actually used them before doing so. I finish up setting quite a remarkable number of things in concrete for some reason, and it would be nice to have experience with another alternative.

  7. #7
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    Hi, I use drop ins a lot for fixing drill rigs to panels for hole coring, depending on which type you get the hole sizes vary. Ramset for instance use standard sizes i:e 12, 16, 18 mm etc I use m12 threaded drop ins and some require a 15mm hole but the standard size is 16mm.
    I should also mention that the piston in the anchor needs to be firmly belted home before screwing anything into them. They will hold against a surprisingly large degree of force.
    And they don't hold well with an oversize hole
    Last edited by waxen; 10th Jan 2018 at 06:18 PM. Reason: Foirgot stuff

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    Awesome, thanks. I will experiment a little and see how it goes. The ones I'm using are M8, small.

  9. #9
    sacc51 is offline Part time brain surgeon. Have own cordless drill.
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    When I was in the industry we used Loxins to fasten balustrading and pretty well anything else that required fixing to concrete, pretty much the same as Dropins. Particularly good for fixing heavy fixtures as there is nothing protruding from the concrete
    thus making it easy to slide heavier items into place. Also easier than Dynabolts when removing fixtures, just a female version of a Dynabolt if you think about it
    Part time brain surgeon/mechanic.

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    Ok, well had a bit of a play with them tonight and from what I've seen think they're awesome. I set one in the vice to see how far it needed to be set before trying the real deal.

    One of the wall plugs I'd used pulled out relatively easily, the other I'd knocked in solidly and needed drilling out. They're not designed for that type of fixing, so no great surprise, but at the end of the day it's only a very light weight fluorescent batten I'm fixing so they probably would have lasted beyond me. These drop ins are 8 mm, threaded M6. I set one (using a suitably sized pin punch I'd marked for depth), threaded in an M6 bolt, put my claw hammer under it and proceeded to put weight on it. It MAY have been starting to pull a little with 50 kg, but keep in mind that was leveraging on the claw. I have no idea what that would represent if it was a straight pull on the fastener itself. I didn't trust my full weight on the claw/bolt/anchor, as I had no need to redo this late at night/admit myself to hospital trying to explain that to the triage team, but was very comfortable it would take a very significant pull.

    Set the other one, not much slower than hammering in a plug, threaded in the bolts and job done. Will definitely be looking to use them again for other concrete fixing.

  11. #11
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    The pullout resistance of drop-in anchors is given in this brochure. A 5/16" anchor in solid 32MPa concrete has a pullout resistance of 15.7kN, which Google tells me is equivalent to a dead load of 1600kg. Impressive.

    I've used these quite a few times to secure heavy duty shelving to Besser block walls where Dynabolts are useless and chemset anchors are not practical.
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Chris

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    a similar anchor I have used are theseSD anch.jpg

    used them extensively...air conditioning units still hanging from the slabs

    these are a self drilling anchor. You fit the tapered plug in after drilling the hole and ram it home and then snap off the taper at other end
    screw in you bolt or threaded rod and hold stuff up

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    Do you know what those ones are called?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Com_VC View Post
    Do you know what those ones are called?

    ramset

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    Cannot seem to find any mention of them on there website.

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