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  1. #31
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    Isn't it suppose to be NO PICTURES DIDNT HAPPEN ?

  2. #32
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    It's a matter of remembering to use PPE. When I was working in factories back in the sixties there was no such thing as PPE. Many of us worked all day with 9" angle grinders, huge belt grinders, largish bench grinders and so on, no PPE was supplied and steel splinters in the eye were a common occurrence. Unfortunately when you're immersed in non safe work practices for years on end you tend not to automatically think about PPE before picking up angle grinders and the like. I have safety glasses positioned all around my shed, on shelves over grinders and linishers, next to angle grinders but still I forget on occasions, had to get a splinter removed from my eye a few weeks ago, funnily enough I was wearing safety glasses at the time! Don't know how the splinter got through as the glasses whilst not goggles were a pretty good fit. Goggles followed by full face visors are definitely the best option I think.

  3. #33
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    No mate or is it bloke or person NO PICTURES DID NOT HAPPEN sorry must be a fib.

  4. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacc51 View Post
    It's a matter of remembering to use PPE. When I was working in factories back in the sixties there was no such thing as PPE. Many of us worked all day with 9" angle grinders, huge belt grinders, largish bench grinders and so on, no PPE was supplied and steel splinters in the eye were a common occurrence. Unfortunately when you're immersed in non safe work practices for years on end you tend not to automatically think about PPE before picking up angle grinders and the like. I have safety glasses positioned all around my shed, on shelves over grinders and linishers, next to angle grinders but still I forget on occasions, had to get a splinter removed from my eye a few weeks ago, funnily enough I was wearing safety glasses at the time! Don't know how the splinter got through as the glasses whilst not goggles were a pretty good fit. Goggles followed by full face visors are definitely the best option I think.
    Sure alzimeres is not kicking in.

  5. #35
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    Not kicking in - kicked in, full blown I'm afraid!

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by sacc51 View Post
    It's a matter of remembering to use PPE. When I was working in factories back in the sixties there was no such thing as PPE. Many of us worked all day with 9" angle grinders, huge belt grinders, largish bench grinders and so on, no PPE was supplied and steel splinters in the eye were a common occurrence. Unfortunately when you're immersed in non safe work practices for years on end you tend not to automatically think about PPE before picking up angle grinders and the like. I have safety glasses positioned all around my shed, on shelves over grinders and linishers, next to angle grinders but still I forget on occasions, had to get a splinter removed from my eye a few weeks ago, funnily enough I was wearing safety glasses at the time! Don't know how the splinter got through as the glasses whilst not goggles were a pretty good fit. Goggles followed by full face visors are definitely the best option I think.
    I can quite understand as to how this can happen as it has happened to me.

    Where I worked at the aluminum refinery had a very strict safety eye wear regime.I wore my PPE including glasses and a full face grinder during grinding.I had witnesses to vouch for it at the time.I still got a splinter in my eye.

    The safety officer and I worked it out. Where I was grinding was a confined space and the spark spray had bounced back and loaded the external rim of my full face visor.

    When I withdrew from the space and flipped the visor up the dust (and splinter) probably went into my hair and eye brows and later that day I reported to first aid with a splinter in my eye.

    We were later issued with light weight cotton balaclavas to wear under a visor in those situations. I will say that the company never stinted on safety gear then they were excellent on that score.

    Theres every chance you may have had unnoticed grinding material in your hair or even in your eyebrows.and later as we all do rub your eyes and and rub the splinter in your eye.

    Grahame

  7. #37
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    I concur with this. Often, since I don't wear gloves, and my hands get oily or greasy, I tend to wipe them on old cut up towels. This wipes away the oil and grease but also rubs fine metal shards into the skin. Sometimes you don't find out for days, or when they go septic. Even barrier cream doesn't help other than making washing the muck off easier.

    I won't comment on SWMBO making me change my shoes before coming into the house...
    Best Regards:
    BaronJ.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by BaronJ View Post
    I won't comment on SWMBO making me change my shoes before coming into the house...
    Nobody makes *me* do anything like that!

    I insist all visitors take their shoes off at the door. I have polished wooden floors, they're in excellent condition and I plan on keeping them in the same condition.

    Generally I take my overalls off before coming past the back door, too. It's no fun treading on a nasty piece of swarf in the middle of the night. I keep thinking that a full amenities room in the machine shop might be worth adding on the north end.

    PDW

  9. #39
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    Stretching the post topic a little ,I think die grinders or specifically the slivers they throw off are worthy of a mention.

    Those bad body are sharp and penetrate light work clothing.
    That's not mentioning accumulating on the PPE sheilds to later fall in your eyes after the work is done. same almost as the grinder splinters above.
    Grahame

  10. #40
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    Always timely reminders.

    Doesn't matter if its 9" or on a Dremel a shattered disc can result in serious injury. Wearing PPE will save some parts but a serious disc shatter from a 3" to 9" or even off a Roddo/Cold cut saw will not stop it tearing through cloths.

    My years of walking along bus & coaches frames carrying a 9" grinder standing on bearers 2" wide to 4" channel I and others were lucky all but one fellow suffered injury. When starting up and grinding roof bearers above your head was enough to have that hidden muscle clench every time.

    I nearly took my leg off grinding a coach bumper bar I was on the floor and put the grinder down between my legs as it was spinning down disc hit the concrete floor enough to spin and grab my overalls cut through and just scored my inner thigh I was in my 2nd yr as an apprentice, I learnt that lesson well.

    A 3" grinder scar I have on index finger of left hand at first knuckle where it cut through to the bone when I got distracted when repairing a trailer at home 4 stitches.

    Discs I purchased when working late 80's all started to disintegrate both 1mm cut off and grinding. Our supplier abused us for rough handling so when he came round the next time we got him to demo use. As he touched the disc to the job it shattered. He returned during the week with all new discs FOC.
    Last edited by wheelinround; 18th Feb 2016 at 09:23 AM. Reason: spelling correcting

  11. #41
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelinround View Post
    Always timely reminders.

    Doesn't matter if its 9" or on a Dremel a shattered disc can result in serious injury. Wearing PPE will save some parts but a serious disc shatter from a 3" to 9" or even off a Roddo/Cold cut saw will not stop it tearing through cloths.
    .
    It depends on the thickness of the disc. Thick discs I agree. However, my experience with breaking some dozens of thin kerf (~1mm) discs up to 125mm in diameter is unless you are really close (100mm) to the disc they won't penetrate cloth or skin. This is because their surface area to mass ratio is high so they slow down very rapidly in air, so by the time they usually hit an operator they are not travelling anywhere near as fast as thicker discs. I have had pieces of disc hit my hands (yes I should be wearing gloves!) some dozens of times and it feels like a close hit (sting) from a large wood chip from a chainsaw. I definitely would not like to be hit in the eye with it.

    It's actually quite difficult to get the thin kerf discs to shatter. When they are pushed (especially sideways) they tend to break off at the arbor washer but hey don't go frisbee-ing across the shed but tend to flop over onto the floor. or work bench. A more likely scenario is that if the work piece grabs the disc then pieces of disc can break off the wheel and these are sometimes hit my hands. When the wheel grabs there is also the risk of the grinder smashing the operators hands up against workpieces = as happened to me recently - now that can hurt and is another good reason for wearing gloves.

    Of course this does not means being casual with PPE, its always a full face shield and ear muffs when using any angle grinder.

  12. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    It depends on the thickness of the disc. Thick discs I agree. However, my experience with breaking some dozens of thin kerf (~1mm) discs up to 125mm in diameter is unless you are really close (100mm) to the disc they won't penetrate cloth or skin. This is because their surface area to mass ratio is high so they slow down very rapidly in air, so by the time they usually hit an operator they are not travelling anywhere near as fast as thicker discs. I have had pieces of disc hit my hands (yes I should be wearing gloves!) some dozens of times and it feels like a close hit (sting) from a large wood chip from a chainsaw. I definitely would not like to be hit in the eye with it.

    It's actually quite difficult to get the thin kerf discs to shatter. When they are pushed (especially sideways) they tend to break off at the arbor washer but hey don't go frisbee-ing across the shed but tend to flop over onto the floor. or work bench. A more likely scenario is that if the work piece grabs the disc then pieces of disc can break off the wheel and these are sometimes hit my hands. When the wheel grabs there is also the risk of the grinder smashing the operators hands up against workpieces = as happened to me recently - now that can hurt and is another good reason for wearing gloves.

    Of course this does not means being casual with PPE, its always a full face shield and ear muffs when using any angle grinder.
    Well Bob I don't think anyone stands holding a grinder from 2ft away........ oh bugger I used to out stretched hanging onto a 3" grinder with a thick wheel trying to grind welds while balancing.

    The cut off discs I mentioned where are one off although I have seen large 12 cold saw disc shatter also glad I wasn't using it and out of area of flying bits.


    The worst thing using any grinder disc in factory situation is never knowing who's handled it and how its been used prior. ike the guy who after lunch picked the grinder up started grinding only to find the nut had not been done up by the guy who had used it prior lunch when he changed the wheel

  13. #43
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelinround View Post
    Well Bob I don't think anyone stands holding a grinder from 2ft away........
    True but the difference in the kinetic energy of the pieces of disc at 100 mm verus 200 mm is quite dramatic.
    The high surface area to volume ratio means the pieces tumble and so they lose speed very quickly
    Based on my experience the pieces are just breaking skin at 100 mm so apart from eyes I doubt they will do much at 200 mm.

    The pieces of the thicker discs will ricochet all over the place whereas I've seen pieces of the thin discs end up fluttering down like a piece of cardboard when flung into the air

    The cut off discs I mentioned where are one off although I have seen large 12 cold saw disc shatter also glad I wasn't using it and out of area of flying bits
    I agree the bigger and thicker discs are far more dangerous..

  14. #44
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    Any power tool has the ability to rip bits apart or off is not used correctly even with proper training and PPE .
    I find that taking care and checking the condition of any disc's or attachments , make sure guards are in place , cords ok, and the operator has respect for the equipment.
    Michael

  15. #45
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    Another grinder accident reported today. Very lucky bloke.
    Man critical after grim accident with four-inch angle grinder | The Daily Advertiser

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