Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 91
  1. #16
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mackay North Qld
    Posts
    4,440

    Default

    A real good point on the wire wheels guys. I had forgotten about them.

    A couple of points which have just come back,
    Check the rpm ratings on wire brushes are suitable to the A /grinder.
    An under rated wheel can spit wires as the machine RPM is too great for its rated RPM.

    The other thing was the shape or twist in the wires.Some brushes are made as straight wire and the better ones have a twist.The straight wire brushes used to splay out horizontally as the top rpms were achieved and frequently let wires go.

    The other one was the quality of the brush.An angle grinder wire brush is not a thing to cheap out on buying. Josco was a good brand as were Makita and Bosch and a few others.

    PDW's comment on wires impaling you took me back quite a few years when I had to go the hospital after hours to get wires embedded in my arm removed.The odd thing was they went in, end on, and parallel to the skin.I was at home a few hours before I noticed the pain and felt the lumps.

    Full face grinders were mentioned too. Hands up!. Who has a full face visor at home for use with their angle grinder?

    Worse still who hasn't?

    Grahame

  2. #17
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    4,257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grahame Collins View Post
    Full face grinders were mentioned too. Hands up!. Who has a full face visor at home for use with their angle grinder?
    2 in my shed.
    1 in my Van along with the other chainsaw PPE
    1 at the mens shed.

    While not life threatening the other health related thing about grinders is the noise so for every visor there is an accompanying set of earmuffs

    Worse still who hasn't?
    A survey of those DIY folk that ended up in hospital revealed that only i in 10 were wearing any sort of PPE.

  3. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Adelaide
    Age
    63
    Posts
    1,085

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PDW View Post
    A welder's jacket is good for stopping wire wheel stray spikes from impaling you too.

    PDW
    Just make sure the welding jacket goes nowhere near the wire wheel. It's hard (impossible?) to find jackets to fit me at 65 kg so they always end up loose and baggy. One moment of inattention some years ago and the grinder and wire wheel ended up chewing it's way through the leather jacket and only stopped when the jacket stalled the 4" grinder. Had it been the 9" I don't like to think what would have happened.

  4. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Australia east coast
    Age
    65
    Posts
    2,313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grahame Collins View Post
    Full face grinders were mentioned too. Hands up!. Who has a full face visor at home for use with their angle grinder?

    Worse still who hasn't?

    Grahame
    Yeah, I have 3 of them, one on the bench next to the vise where I do the vast majority of my grinding/cutting. Also ear muffs & riggers gloves.

    I'm too lazy to change over cutting disks, wire wheels etc so I have quite a few 5" grinders. Only 1 9" grinder though, and 99% of the time it stays in the cupboard.

    PDW

  5. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Age
    68
    Posts
    5,079

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Grahame Collins View Post

    Full face grinders were mentioned too. Hands up!. Who has a full face visor at home for use with their angle grinder?

    Grahame
    Yep, I find them more comfortable than safety glasses, although my normal glasses are supposed to be toughened somehow.

    My biggest hazard with angle grinders is setting jeans on fire...

  6. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Helensburgh
    Posts
    281

    Default

    I never use safety glasses as I reckon the rest of my face deserves the same safety precautions as my eyes do. I guess I have been using full face protection for about as long as it has been available because I used to wear glasses and it just made sense. When I did a lot of OA welding I also used a full face due my glasses fogging up with goggles and the odd tip backfire never worried me.
    CHRIS

  7. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Blue Mtns
    Posts
    102

    Default

    You have to wonder looking at that list. You can't buy an electrical item or a plumbing item without them ramming into you to use a licensed tradesman. But tools like angle grinders and chainsaws are available to all

  8. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Blue Mtns
    Posts
    102

    Default

    Good reminder on the full face protection. What do most get? Can you still get those ones combined with muffs?

  9. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Emerald Central Qld
    Posts
    293

    Default

    Full face visors can be fitted to some bump caps along with hearing protection.

    PPE is ok as long as you remember it is a last resort.

    Another thing to take in board is the amount of wriggle room that you have when using the tools , sometimes safety glasses are all that you can have on as the visor gets caught on the material above your head.

    Good discussion to have occasionally just to remind all of us of the risks involved with what we choose to do .

    PS, how many people do you see using a weed eater in bare feet , no eye protection and a t shirt???
    Michael

  10. #25
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    4,257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by achjimmy View Post
    Good reminder on the full face protection. What do most get? Can you still get those ones combined with muffs?
    I use the Armadillo brand with the 3D curvature under the chin as 3D curved surface is stronger than a simple 2D curve.
    I use Peltor Muffs with the behind the neck band as this clips over the adjustment knob for the Armadillo headband and the two hold each other on in a very positive manner.

    You have to wonder looking at that list. You can't buy an electrical item or a plumbing item without them ramming into you to use a licensed tradesman. But tools like angle grinders and chainsaws are available to all
    It varies across manufacturers but the better brands like Stihl and Husqvarna do have very comprehensive safety information in their manuals.
    The standard 60+ page Stihl operators manual has the first 26 pages related to safety.
    Compare this to the Ryobi petrol chainsaw which has an 18 page manual with about 12 pages on safety, while its electric chainsaw has similar pages numbers but the diagrams are separated from the text at the end of the manual

    For its bigger saws the Stihl manuals states clearly on the front page.
    ]This saw is capabale of severe kickbackwhich may cause serious or fatal injury.
    Only for users with extraordinary cutting needs andexperience and training dealing with kickback.
    Chainsaws with significantly reduced kickbackpotential are available.
    STIHL recommendsthe use of STIHL reduced kickback bar and low kickback chain.
    Unfortunately few DIY will buy the more expensive brands and so will end up with a cheap version with less threatening language. Not that I think tool manufacturers instructions are worth much in terms of preventing injuries as these are usually written to cover their legal backside. The other issue is that few (males) read the instructions anyway.

    Chainsaw injuries and deaths to professional workers have dropped very significantly with the increased use of Chainsaw chaps and hardhats, and improved training since the 1990's, but I know of very few DIY who use this level of PPE. Normally I'm a stickler for chainsaw PPE use but the one time in the last few years I did not wear PPE to cut down a 4" diameter Paperbark tree from my mum the chain came off the 25" bar and whipped around and dealt me an eye watering blow between the legs. Luckily the chain was not actually rotating at the time.

    A body map of chainsaw injuries shows that one of the most common chainsaw injuries (~30% where standard chainsaw PPE also doesn't help much) is where an operator believes they can hold a piece of wood with one hand and use the chainsaw with the other. What invariable happens is the chainsaw cannot be held firmly enough so the chain skates across the surface of the wood and into the operators hand. Similar injuries happen with grinders. Even though they can be easily defeated it's almost like all the handles need deadman switches on them. I'd like to see deadman switches on both handles of routers as well.

  11. #26
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Australia east coast
    Age
    65
    Posts
    2,313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BobL View Post
    I'd like to see deadman switches on both handles of routers as well.
    Waste of time, humans are far too creative - I use router bits in a die grinder for freehand wood butchery. Works great.....

    ...... but I wouldn't actually recommend it to anyone if they are currently attached to all their digits.

    Agree about chain saws. As I've gotten older, the size chainsaw I'm comfortable using has dropped. I even have one of those twee 14" electric ones nowadays and it gets a lot more use than my Stihl does.

    PDW

  12. #27
    BobL is online now Member: Blue and white apron brigade
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Perth
    Posts
    4,257

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PDW View Post
    Waste of time, humans are far too creative - I use router bits in a die grinder for freehand wood butchery. Works great.....
    Agreed but someone might used them.

    BIL uses router bits in die grinders for Al work on boats and he also uses die grinder bits in routers.

  13. #28
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Location
    Mackay North Qld
    Posts
    4,440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by achjimmy View Post
    You have to wonder looking at that list. You can't buy an electrical item or a plumbing item without them ramming into you to use a licensed tradesman. But tools like angle grinders and chainsaws are available to all
    achjimmy,
    The nub of the problem is that some new A/G operators will not read instructions,do not not seek advice other than from similar idiots on Utube and then wonder why they get hurt.
    Ego and pride and are certainly part of the problem.

    You hear and see the "git it done" mentality from some on the oversees forums and with it seems to come a willingness by those individuals to use unsafe practices and expose themselves to harm not only in what we are speaking now ,but in quite wide range of activities (metal working and other wise- where safety procedures are short -cutted in favour of getting the job done quicker and cheaper- quite often these people are owner operators so I understand why, but will never agree with them.

    My guess is is that we never change those types ,but hopefully if beginners can read advice on best practice safety matters here, they may well avoid the bad habits promoted elsewhere.

    Even if we change one persons mind on machine safety its well worth the effort,though we might never know it.

  14. #29
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Melbourne
    Posts
    610

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by achjimmy View Post
    You have to wonder looking at that list. You can't buy an electrical item or a plumbing item without them ramming into you to use a licensed tradesman. But tools like angle grinders and chainsaws are available to all
    Licensed or not accidents will still happen. The same thing happens with cars...

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    QLD
    Posts
    592

    Default

    No regulating them chainsaws. I own a chainsaw and I VOTE !


    ...actually, I got three of them. Big one for ripping them posts, mid size one fer dropping them gums, and a little one to carry on the quad bike.
    ====================================
    The best way to combat Global Warming Hysteria is via reasoned argument.
    http://joannenova.com.au

Page 2 of 7 FirstFirst 1234567 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. Game changer - very interesting ABC news article
    By nearnexus in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 3rd Sep 2013, 06:35 PM
  2. Eveleigh news article + video
    By AndrewOC in forum THE SMITHY
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 25th Jul 2013, 06:01 PM
  3. Versatile Tool and Cutter Grinder "made in Melbourne"
    By Garry Edwards in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 22nd Feb 2012, 09:50 PM
  4. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 5th May 2009, 08:18 PM
  5. Difference "Galvanised" and "Primed" Steel
    By Fr_303 in forum METALWORK GENERAL
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 22nd Jan 2008, 05:59 PM

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •