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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Age
    57
    Posts
    216

    Default Richardson E39 Bench Drill Press Restoration

    I picked up an old Richardson E39 drill press for $30 about a month ago, it had been lying in pieces in a shed on a rural property for many years and was pretty rusted up.

    Drill1 (Medium).jpg drill2 (Medium).jpg

    I already have an el-cheapo floor model that I got from Supa-Cheap but the quill was sloppy out of the box and far from a precision machine. The Richardson looks to have been made in the 60s and is solid as the preverbial.

    The wiring was totally perished so I stripped it out (will replace with more up-to-date setup) and temporarily hooked up a plug and reassembled it. It fired up and ran OK but it needed a bit of TLC to restore it to its former glory.

    Pulled it right down and wire brushed the rust off (angle grinder driven), followed by a lot of elbow grease and emery cloth... it took many hours to get it rust free... more than a bit of a wire brush that the seller reckoned it needed

    Then on to the paintwork, first with a flap disk and more elbow grease and emery cloth.

    Stripped (Medium).jpg

    Last weekend I welded up some tube for the stand that it will live on, you can see it in the picture above, it still needs a bit of work to finish it off, some drawers need to go in between the framework.

    This weekend I got around to putting a coat of hammer finish green on the beast, black on the motor after a coat of rust converter, and got all the parts ready for reassembly.

    Base (Medium).jpgParts (Medium).jpg

    I will blacken all the nuts and bolts before I re-assemble.
    The first step towards knowledge is to know that we are ignorant.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Victoria, Australia
    Age
    68
    Posts
    5,079

    Default

    Congratulations on a fine looking restoration, it looks like it will come up as good as new.

    The table looks to be in remarkably good condition as well.

    It's good to see restorations like this, another machine saved for posterity!..

    Regards
    Ray

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    shep Victoria
    Age
    91
    Posts
    154

    Default

    T^hey just don't make tools like this any more ,and if they did you cant afford to buy them, nice restoration. Eddie

  4. #4
    Dave J Guest

    Default

    Great restro, that will see your life out now.

    Dave

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Age
    57
    Posts
    216

    Default

    Thanks guys. I just love the old stuff... it's well made, solid, feels good to use and it's good for probably several life times. I bought it off a guy who looked to be in his 70s and the drill press was his dad's, a fitter and turner.

    Ray, that shot of the base and table is pretty flattering on the table's surface, here is another that shows the inevitable holes that have been drilled in it, still not to bad for a 50-year old machine.

    Table (Medium).jpg

    I filled the divots with Devcon epoxy.
    The first step towards knowledge is to know that we are ignorant.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Age
    57
    Posts
    216

    Default Richardson E39 Drill Press Resoration and Stand

    Finished off the Richardson today, I'm pretty happy with the end result.

    Upgraded electricals, the enclosure looks like it was made for it. I've used the same type of LED light on my mill, lathe and and other drill press, good value online for about $20.

    Elect (Medium).jpg Drill3 (Medium).jpg Drill4 (Medium).jpg

    Replaced the chuck with a keyless, about 0.03mm runout after some 'fine tuning'

    Chuck (Medium).jpg

    Stand is now finished too. Picked up the steel 3-drawer cabinet for $20 from the recyclers and made the stand to suit.

    Stand1 (Medium).jpg Stand2 (Medium).jpg
    The first step towards knowledge is to know that we are ignorant.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Bendigo
    Age
    45
    Posts
    571

    Default

    Nuthin wrong with the old stuff.

    I do try n keep my old hand me down gear going as long as I reasonably can. Hard to find stuff built as good nowdays.
    www.lockwoodcanvas.com.au

    I will never be the person who has everything, not when someone keeps inventing so much cool new stuff to buy.

    From an early age my father taught me to wear welding gloves . "Its not to protect your hands son, its to put out the fire when u set yourself alight".

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Melbourne, Victoria
    Posts
    165

    Default

    Great job. I think that the drill looks fantastic, and I particularly like the stand/cabinet set-up. I've been inspired to do something similar.

    Joe

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    sandstone point queensland
    Age
    63
    Posts
    65

    Default

    I have the same drill press and i was wondering how to get the shaft further up the quill as your is ,and what do the two bolts at the front do? I tighten them then the quill wont move? thanks bob
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Charlestown NSW
    Age
    59
    Posts
    1,022

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by robyn2839 View Post
    ,and what do the two bolts at the front do? I tighten them then the quill wont move? thanks bob
    Yes. Basically there to adjust the amount of play between the quil and the housing

    Peter

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